Is My Vision Loss Normal?

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You may be one of thousands of Americans experiencing vision problems as you age. Blurred vision… difficulty seeing at night… double vision… and problems distinguishing colors are some common symptoms.

But other symptoms may indicate a more serious condition called age-related macular degeneration (AMD). According to Michael Cutler, M.D., there are two forms of AMD—dry and wet. Wet AMD is the leading cause of blindness in the United States for people 55 and older.

Dry macular degeneration usually develops slowly over time with slow-progressing symptoms. But wet AMD usually develops quickly, leaving people with sudden central vision loss. If left untreated both forms of AMD can damage your eye and cause you to develop a blind spot.

You should see your eye doctor for a referral to a retina specialist if you experience:

  • A need for brighter light when working close to an item
  • Difficulty adapting to low light levels
  • Blurry print when reading (e.g. newspapers, books)
  • Difficulty driving
  • Problems with colors appearing less bright
  • Difficulty recognizing faces
  • Overall vision haziness
  • A blind spot in the center of your vision

With early diagnosis and proper treatment you may be able to delay the progression of AMD. And the earlier it is detected the better your chances of saving your sight!

Personal Liberty

Bob Livingston

founder of Personal Liberty Digest™, is an ultra-conservative American author and editor of The Bob Livingston Letter™, in circulation since 1969. Bob has devoted much of his life to research and the quest for truth on a variety of subjects. Bob specializes in health issues such as nutritional supplements and alternatives to drugs, as well as issues of privacy (both personal and financial), asset protection and the preservation of freedom.

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