How Soon We Forget

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On June 4, 1789, the U.S. Constitution became the official governing document of a young United States, when it was ratified by a two-thirds majority of the 13 existing States.

Our Founding Fathers labored for more than a year to create a document that would make the people as free as possible — and the government (especially the Federal government) as limited as possible. Even so, a majority of States would not approve the document until 10 amendments were added. The Bill of Rights was even more definite in telling government what it could not do.

The new Constitution received extraordinary praise from other political leaders, including William Pitt of England, who said, “It will be the wonder and admiration of all future generations.” His colleague William Gladstone agreed: “It is the greatest piece of work ever struck off at a given time by the brain and purpose of man.”

It’s too bad this inspired document isn’t held in the same high regard today by the citizens who have benefited so mightily from it — or the politicians who have sworn to honor and protect it.

–Chip Wood

Chip Wood

is the geopolitical editor of PersonalLiberty.com. He is the founder of Soundview Publications, in Atlanta, where he was also the host of an award-winning radio talk show for many years. He was the publisher of several bestselling books, including Crisis Investing by Doug Casey, None Dare Call It Conspiracy by Gary Allen and Larry Abraham and The War on Gold by Anthony Sutton. Chip is well known on the investment conference circuit where he has served as Master of Ceremonies for FreedomFest, The New Orleans Investment Conference, Sovereign Society, and The Atlanta Investment Conference.