HHS Reveals 365,000 Have ‘Selected’ Obamacare; Still No Word On How Many Have Actually Purchased

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A two-month report released Tuesday by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services claims a combined 364,682 people had “selected” an Obamacare insurance plan through either the Federal Healthcare.gov website or through one of the State-managed exchanges, as of Nov. 30.

The report doesn’t say how many among that tiny group had actually committed to buying the insurance they’d placed in their online shopping carts.

For perspective, there are roughly 200,000 more people living in Wyoming, the Nation’s least populous State, than the almost 365,000 who took their potential Obamacare purchase at least as far as the virtual cash register. In order to actually enroll in Obamacare, as with any coverage, a customer has to enter into a contract agreement with an insurer that discloses to the customer what they’re paying and what they’re getting and that assures the insurer that the customer is committed to paying.

HHS hasn’t made those figures public yet — if it even knows them at all.

In the buildup to the Oct. 1 launch of Obamacare, HHS had projected 1.2 million people would enroll during the law’s first two months of implementation, with a total of 7 million enrolled by the March 31, 2014 closing bell for open enrollment.

In the meantime, 5 million healthcare plans (so far) have been canceled in the first Obamacare wave, as insurers drop individual policies that don’t conform to the law’s one-size-fits-all benefits scheme.

Ben Bullard

Reconciling the concept of individual sovereignty with conscientious participation in the modern American political process is a continuing preoccupation for staff writer Ben Bullard. A former community newspaper writer, Bullard has closely observed the manner in which well-meaning small-town politicians and policy makers often accept, unthinkingly, their increasingly marginal role in shaping the quality of their own lives, as well as those of the people whom they serve. He argues that American public policy is plagued by inscrutable and corrupt motives on a national scale, a fundamental problem which individuals, families and communities must strive to solve. This, he argues, can be achieved only as Americans rediscover the principal role each citizen plays in enriching the welfare of our Republic.