Here’s A Map Of Jay Carney’s ‘Small Sliver’ Of Americans Whose Insurance Has Been Canceled Thanks To Obamacare

0 Shares

Remember Jay Carney on NBC’s “Morning Joe” last week, telling a former Bush appointee that “only a sliver or cut” of the American population was getting policy cancelation notices thanks to Obamacare’s one-size-fits-all coverage mandates?

The comment was intended to diminish the strength of criticisms that President Barack Obama had lied about people getting to keep health coverage they liked, as well as to deflect some of the heat the Administration has taken for the egregiousness of the falsehood of one of the President’s most famous statements.

But here’s a map that illustrates just how many people on individual health plans have been dropped by their providers because of Obamacare. Four hundred thousand people in Georgia is not a sliver; nor is 900,000 in California or 800,000 in New Jersey.

canceled

The map reflects only individual policy cancelations and doesn’t consider the effects of Obamacare on employer-sponsored group plans. And it’s a snapshot of a moment in time in the early days of the Obamacare rollout. Across the board, these numbers will increase. And it only shows data gathered from 16 States and Washington, D.C.

Just for fun, here’s a link to a Fox News story about Obamacare’s effect on insurance costs hitting Republican States harder than Democratic States.

And here’s a story about a Virginia school district that’s considering hiring a gaggle of substitute teachers because it can’t afford the ballooning cost of employee benefits for full time teachers under Obamacare.

And one more about doctors at small New York offices defecting from their line of work or retiring early because of the market push toward larger, cheaper, inferior centralized health care that Obamacare is bringing about.

Looks like 2014 is not the year to get sick.

Ben Bullard

Reconciling the concept of individual sovereignty with conscientious participation in the modern American political process is a continuing preoccupation for staff writer Ben Bullard. A former community newspaper writer, Bullard has closely observed the manner in which well-meaning small-town politicians and policy makers often accept, unthinkingly, their increasingly marginal role in shaping the quality of their own lives, as well as those of the people whom they serve. He argues that American public policy is plagued by inscrutable and corrupt motives on a national scale, a fundamental problem which individuals, families and communities must strive to solve. This, he argues, can be achieved only as Americans rediscover the principal role each citizen plays in enriching the welfare of our Republic.

Join the Discussion

Comment Policy: We encourage an open discussion with a wide range of viewpoints, even extreme ones, but we will not tolerate racism, profanity or slanderous comments toward the author(s) or comment participants. Make your case passionately, but civilly. Please don't stoop to name calling. We use filters for spam protection. If your comment does not appear, it is likely because it violates the above policy or contains links or language typical of spam. We reserve the right to remove comments at our discretion.