Do Your Hemorrhoids Indicate Something Serious?

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Although it may be embarrassing to discuss the unpleasant condition of hemorrhoids with your healthcare provider, it could be important for your digestive and excretory health.

Hemorrhoids occur when the veins located in your rectum and anus become inflamed, swollen and twisted. They can be very painful and are most often caused by constipation or pressure during bowel movements. For women, they can develop during pregnancy and childbirth.

The symptoms include blood in your stool, itching and rectal pain. If you are over the age of 50 and see an increase in the amount of blood in your stool on a regular basis, it’s best to see a physician regarding your condition. The blood may be a sign of abnormal cell growth in your rectum or colon.

Check out these at-home solutions to relieve your hemorrhoids:

  • Help solve your constipation woes with more fiber and whole foods, plus add probiotics for digestion and drink plenty of water. Some studies recommend you drink at least half your body weight in ounces (i.e., a 150-pound person should drink 75 ounces of water).
  • Dab a cotton ball with witch hazel or apple cider vinegar and apply to the hemorrhoid. It should begin to shrink in about 15 minutes. Wipes and ointments are also available with witch hazel and other natural ingredients.
  • Use a sitz bath to soothe inflammation. This process involves sitting in shallow bath of warm water for 10 to 15 minutes to help relieve the pain.

If you continue to experience hemorrhoids, your physician may recommend several surgical procedures to reduce the inflammation.

Bob Livingston

founder of Personal Liberty Digest™, is an ultra-conservative American author and editor of The Bob Livingston Letter™, in circulation since 1969. Bob has devoted much of his life to research and the quest for truth on a variety of subjects. Bob specializes in health issues such as nutritional supplements and alternatives to drugs, as well as issues of privacy (both personal and financial), asset protection and the preservation of freedom.

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