Gun Ownership Difficult Despite Rulings By High Court

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In 2008, following a court case that challenged the restrictive gun laws in Washington, D.C., the Supreme Court ordered local government officials to make it possible for law-abiding residents to own a gun, Fox News reported.

According to the news outlet, this ruling was a landmark 2nd Amendment win for guns rights advocates, but there has been growing disagreement among local residents about whether the decision made a difference.

Emily Miller, a senior opinion editor at The Washington Times and also a victim of a crime, decided to get a gun following the High Court's decision. She encountered many problems and in the end it took her five months and cost $500, plus the price of the firearm.

"These gun control measures are so counterproductive because they are not stopping the criminals from getting guns," Miller said. "They are stopping the law-abiding people from getting guns to protect themselves."

According to her article in the Times, Miller noted that there is a 22-page handgun restriction packet that is provided by the District of Columbia, but this information contains only three bullet points for guidance on legal transport of the firearm. 

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