Gallup Examines Democrats

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A report by Gallup published on Tuesday notes two changes that have occurred in the Democratic Party since it nominated Barack Obama as its 2008 Presidential candidate: It is more liberal and less white now.

The study examined a segment of the population who identified themselves as Democrats or Democrat-leaning independents and found that since 2008 this segment of the population has fallen from 50 to 43 percent. The number of Republicans grew by 3 percent — to 40 percent — as did independents who preferred neither party — to 15 percent — during the same time frame.

Among Democrats, the number of those who described themselves as liberal grew from 35 to 37 percent, a fact researchers attribute to moderates and conservatives who once identified with some Democratic values feeling largely disenfranchised in recent years.

Over the past three years, the Democratic Party also noticed a small ethnic shift, according to the findings, with the number of party members who identified themselves as black growing from 16 to 19 percent and non-Hispanic white Democrats decreasing from 66 to 63 percent.

Other Gallup findings indicate no significant shift in the fact that Democrats are less likely than the U.S. population as a whole to marry or attend regular church services and more likely to be college educated.

The age of the Party has decreased slightly as more 18- to 29-year-olds identify themselves as Democrats. It also has become more female; women represent 55 percent of the Party’s base.

Sam Rolley

Staff writer Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After learning about many of the biases present in most modern newsrooms, Rolley became determined to find a position in journalism that would allow him to combat the unsavory image that the news industry has gained. He is dedicated to seeking the truth and exposing the lies disseminated by the mainstream media at the behest of their corporate masters, special interest groups and information gatekeepers.