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FTC Proposes New Privacy Regulation

March 27, 2012 by  

FTC Proposes New Privacy Regulation
PHOTOS.COM
Americans concerned that corporations are tracking them online and violating their Internet privacy may find some relief in a new Federal Trade Commission report.

Americans concerned that corporations are tracking them online and violating their Internet privacy may find some relief in a new Federal Trade Commission report pledging that consumers will have a “Do Not Track” option by the end of the year.

The FTC takes the White House “privacy bill of rights” that was released last month a step further by ensuring consumers will be informed by companies what type of online tracking they are subject to and will be given an option to opt out, according to The Washington Post.

“Although some companies have excellent privacy and data securities practices, industry as a whole must do better,” the report states.

In the report, the FTC also calls for Congress to pass legislation to provide consumers access to the online marketing data that companies store about them.

The agency emphasized heavily on mobile Internet devices in the report as well, saying that there should be regulations regarding corporate use of an individual’s location data, which can be obtained from the devices.

Sam Rolley

Staff writer Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After learning about many of the biases present in most modern newsrooms, Rolley became determined to find a position in journalism that would allow him to combat the unsavory image that the news industry has gained. He is dedicated to seeking the truth and exposing the lies disseminated by the mainstream media at the behest of their corporate masters, special interest groups and information gatekeepers.

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  • vicki

    Does that “do not track” button work against the NSA tracking us too? I bet not. But I bet a lot of people will think so. Hence we see the motive behind the government forcing companies to provide a “do not track” button.

    Btw most browsers already have such a button.

    • been tracked for years and cannot avoid it

      I use internet explorer where can I find the “do not track button?”

      • Vicki

        Look under the privacy settings in the tools. (I think) or go to startpage.com and search for IE privacy. You could use google but startpage claims to not track you.

  • Sirian

    A “Privacy Regulation”? Oh, I get it, tack in another “regulation” and all will be well. . . Sure :( Keep an eye on the other hand – there is more at play with this then what will be fully revealed.

  • http://ccopakeman.wordpress.com copakeman

    how big a flag will go up when someone checks the “do not track” box ? my opinion of what will happen is, the black/brown shirts will kick your home door out (around 3am) and take you away to stay at one of our comfortable prisons indefinetely.

    can you trust anything our current govt approves of ?

  • James

    There is no such thing as “internet privacy.” The only safe way to make communications secure from federal monitoring is the U.S. mail – sealed envelopes. Anything else is public domain and open to federal scrutiny.

    • Sirian

      Not quite so, James. Steaming open envelopes, copying what’s inside, resealing and shipping forward never to be noticed on the receiving end has been a very simple method used for well over a hundred years. If they deem it worthwhile and want to know, they can find out whether or not it is in an envelope or computer file. People simply don’t understand as to what level privacy has been reduced to. If the NSA can keep an eye on you 24/7/365 – which they can – then how secure would the mail be?

  • Rod Roberts

    The “Do Not Track” regulation will probably be like the Federal “Do Not Call” regulation; 75% of the calls I get are calls from sales, charities, or POLITICIANS! They’re exempt under the law. So what’s to keep Do Not Trackers from tracking? What about all the information they’ve gathered about each of us? These trackers have devised computer viruses to send back information to them constantly. What about their illegal spying? No, another stupid regulation that won’t work will be written and the POLs will say, “We fixed the situation. We regulated it.” Our legislators and pencil pushers in DC all need to be on the jobless lines.

  • 45caliber

    Does anyone seriously believe that even if this law goes into operation that the GOVERNMENT won’t ignore it? This is only to attempt to make the people feel more secure. If they were really interested in solving this problem, simply insist that the phones no longer can have the installation of parts that makes it possible to follow them.

  • s c

    To get around the finer points of wiretapping, various law enforcements took refuge in the idea that privacy via a public phone was NOT protected because a user had “no reasonable right of the expectation of privacy.” In this matter [new privacy regulations], it sounds like a test issue that will be morphed into forced acceptance at a later date.
    People, if you think Uncle Scam is going to develop a conscience, you might consider getting yourself sterilized so the gene pool will be protected. Uncle Scam is NOT your friend. He’s not my friend. He’s NO ONE’s friend. He’s a monster that’s temporarily on a short leash.

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