Firearms Company Magpul Makes Good On Pledge To Leave Colorado Over Gun Control Laws

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Magpul, maker of gun accessories like grips, mounts, sights and magazines, was among the first firearms companies to take a principled stand against gun control laws passed last year in Colorado, where the company had done business for the past 14 years.

In March, Magpul announced that it would not continue to operate in a State that limits its residents’ 2nd Amendment freedoms while playing host to firearms manufacturers that can make — but not sell — their goods in Colorado.

It wasn’t just idle talk: Magpul makes 30-round magazines, which are now illegal under Colorado’s new ban on mags that hold more than 15 rounds.

“If we’re able to stay in Colorado and manufacture a product, but law-abiding citizens of the state were unable to purchase the product, customers around the state and the nation would boycott us for remaining here,” Magpul COO Doug Smith told The Denver Post shortly before the Democratic-controlled State Legislature and Governor John Hickenlooper approved the new gun laws. “Staying here would hurt our business.”

Now Magpul is making good on that pledge. The company announced late last week that it has secured new manufacturing and distribution facilities in Cheyenne, Wyo., and will move its corporate headquarters to one of three locations under consideration in northern Texas.

In last week’s announcement, Smith and Magpul CEO Richard Fitzpatrick each reiterated the reason the company elected to move its operations.

“Magpul made the decision to relocate in March 2013 and has proceeded on an aggressive but deliberate path,” said Smith. “These dual moves will be carried out in a manner that ensures our operations and supply chain will not be interrupted and our loyal customers will not be affected.”

“Moving operations to states that support our culture of individual liberties and personal responsibility is important,” said Fitzpatrick. “This relocation will also improve business operations and logistics as we utilize the strengths of Texas and Wyoming in our expansion.”

Ben Bullard

Reconciling the concept of individual sovereignty with conscientious participation in the modern American political process is a continuing preoccupation for staff writer Ben Bullard. A former community newspaper writer, Bullard has closely observed the manner in which well-meaning small-town politicians and policy makers often accept, unthinkingly, their increasingly marginal role in shaping the quality of their own lives, as well as those of the people whom they serve. He argues that American public policy is plagued by inscrutable and corrupt motives on a national scale, a fundamental problem which individuals, families and communities must strive to solve. This, he argues, can be achieved only as Americans rediscover the principal role each citizen plays in enriching the welfare of our Republic.

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