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Female Student In Illinois Gets Green Light On Tuxedo

April 5, 2011 by  

Female student in Illinois gets green light on tuxedoAt the behest of civil rights advocates, a female student in Illinois has been granted permission to wear a tuxedo to her high school prom.

Belinda Sanchez, a senior at Proviso East High School, met with Principal Milton Patch last month to discuss her desired attire. According to Sanchez, a lesbian, Patch denied her request and said that he didn't want the prom to become a "sideshow."

Sanchez contacted the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Illinois, which then contacted the school district and said the dress code policy was an example of "gender discrimination." In addition, the group said that Sanchez's freedom to wear a tuxedo is protected by the 1st Amendment's guarantee of free expression.

On March 30, Proviso officials confirmed that Sanchez's request has been granted.

"It's a 1st Amendment right, a free speech right, and that includes her right to send a message through wearing male clothing that she doesn't think women should be restricted to traditional female clothing," said John Knight, director of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Project at the ACLU, quoted by The Chicago Tribune.

Last year, officials at a Mississippi school district agreed to pay more than $116,000 in legal damages after denying Constance McMillan's request to wear a tuxedo to prom and attend the event with her girlfriend. The district also agreed to adopt a new policy that prohibited discrimination based on sexual orientation. 

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  • Brad

    Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

    Can someone tell me where in the first amendment the freedom of expression is?

    Maybe this will help found it realy quick on the net, definition of expression;

    1. The process of making known one’s thoughts or feelings.

    2. The conveying of opinions publicly without interference by the government

    • Kinetic1

      Brad,
      Freedom of speech. Since speech is a form of expression it has been postulated that any form of expression that does not violate our laws (in the same way that you do not have the right to yell fire to entice panic) is protected under freedom of speech. I know there are those who believe that we should follow the Constitution and the Bill of Rights verbatim, but then there are those who feel that way about the Bible as well. I can’t see where either benefit from a closed mind.

      • 45caliber

        Some time back a federal judge in Washington state made a decision that burning the American flag was a form of freedom of speech. BUT … he also noted that the effort to put out that fire by anyone who disagreed with it was also freedom of speech. The last guy to try to burn one found out when he was knocked head over tea kettle when he tried to stop someone from putting out the flames.

        While I have no personal problem with this girl wearing a tux, I suspect that others might. And they should also have their freedom of speech granted. Further, I wonder about her date and what girls might be willing to dance with her. Most schools I’m familiar with have a rule that dates must be from the school. Can she fulfill that? Or is it required there?

        • Kinetic1

          I’m sure we all agree that freedom of speech refers only to a citizens right not to be censored by an agent of the government. As such, without proof that her choice would present a danger to others I can’t see where the principle had any right to deny her request. As for the parents and students of the school, they can say what ever they want, but I hope your not suggesting that they have the right to physically accost Ms. Sanchez to prevent her from attending the prom in her tux.

          • Brad

            All Ms. Sanchez got was her 15 minutes of fame, and as another person stated, if she had just shown up in her tux no one would have been the wiser and all would have had a good time at the prom.

          • Kinetic1

            Brad,
            And as I pointed out, she did not have the option to “just show up.” She was only following school rules when she went to the principle.

      • Brad

        So when does expression relate to what one wears on their back? Expression convays thought and bringing it out, a prom is a formal affair where appropriate attire for men and women is worn not expressed.

        • Kinetic1

          Brad,
          Fashion is the very definition of expression. Also, who is to say what is “appropriate attire for men and women”? If Yves Saint Laurent designs a tux for women and the fashion world embraces it, doesn’t that suggest that it may be appropriate?

          • Brad

            Kinetic1,

            The real question is, was Ms. Sanchez going to make her Tux and wear it to the prom, if not, its not expression, its I want it my way and to hell with the school.

  • Jay

    Feminism is not a simple or unified philosophy. Many different women (and men) call themselves feminists, and the beliefs of these groups of people vary quite a bit. Here’s a quick primer on some of the different kinds of feminism.

    Liberal Feminism
    Liberal feminism is characterized by an individualistic emphasis on equality. According to this philosophy, society itself does not need a major overhaul, but rather laws need to be changed and opportunities have to be opened up to allow women to become equals in society. To a liberal feminist, evidence of progress is seen largely by the numbers of women in positions previous occupied by men, especially powerful positions. In the United States and much of the Western world, liberal feminism is the most mainstream form of feminism.

    Socialist Feminism
    Socialist feminism (sometimes known as Marxist feminism) is different than liberal feminism in that it emphasizes that true equality will not be achieved without major overhauls within society– particularly economic overhauls. Socialist feminists argue that there are fundamental inequalities built in to a capitalist society because power and capital are distributed unevenly. Thus, it’s not enough for women to individually work to rise to powerful positions in society; rather, power needs to be redistributed throughout society. Liberal feminists focus on individual empowerment, while socialist feminists focus on collective change and empowerment.

    Radical Feminism
    Radical feminism is similar to socialist feminism in that it emphasizes the need for dramatic social change in order to achieve genuine equality for women (and sometimes these two philosophies are grouped together). Radical feminists believe that society is extremely patriarchal, and until patriarchy is transformed on all levels, the system will remain unjust. A minority of radical feminists are separatist feminists, who believe that men and women need to maintain separate institutions and relationships.

    Third Wave Feminism
    Third Wave feminism is popular among younger women, many of whom are children of feminists from the 1970s (who are referred to as Second Wave Feminists). Similar to liberal feminism, Third Wave feminism is very individualistic. Although it does not reject political activism, Third Wave feminism is focused more on personal empowerment as a starting place for social change. Third Wave feminism celebrates the construction of individual identities in a complex, postmodern world, and invites women to define themselves as they wish from the smorgasbord of possibilities.

    Ecofeminism
    Ecofeminisim draws from and links together both the women’s movement and the environmental movement. Ecofeminism draws parallels between the domination and exploitation of both women and nature.

    Black Feminism
    Black Feminism posits that sexism and racism are inextricably linked, and that sexism will never be overcome while the system is still so fundamentally racist. This movement grew out of the discontent of African Americans women during the Women’s Liberation Movement in the 1970s, who felt their particular needs as minority women were not being addressed. The term “Black feminism” is often used to encompass the needs of all women of color.

    • http://n.cates@cox.net Norman F.

      Define “post modern world”.

      • Jay

        A philosophical stance which claims that it is impossible to make grand statements—meta-narratives—about the structures of society or about historic causation, because everything we perceive, express, and interpret is influenced by our gender, class, and culture; knowledge is partial and situated, and no one interpretation is superior to another. Some have argued that postmodernism is related to post-Fordism, and the rise of consumer capitalism, economic globalization, the information economy, and new models of flexible accumulation, but these titles are, of course, meta-narratives—the very interpretations which postmodernists reject.

        Postmodernism has confirmed in geographers the recognition that space, place, and scale are social constructs, not external givens. Of particular interest is the way that time and space have been ‘compressed’ by modern transport systems, especially by jumbo jets; postmodernity differs from modernity in that it is less territorially bounded—nowhere is very far away any more. As a result, cultures are transformed. Some geographers claim that postmodernism challenges the dominance of time and history in social theories, and instead stresses the significance of geography and spatiality.

        The postmodern tradition also stresses, and indeed champions, difference, and this is a strand which has been welcomed by feminist geographers, who would claim that geography has been speaking in an authoritarian, masculinist voice for too long.

        • 45caliber

          Which group believes in free sex and is against marriage? Also which group is against women who wish to be wives and mothers?

    • crystal

      Your term “Black Feminism” is incorrect. Black women have and always will use the term “Womanism.”

  • http://n.cates@cox.net Norman F.

    Just suppose that a male student, know as a “stud” to many girls, and his current girl friend decided to wear identical prom dresses to the prom. How do you think the school (and the American Crazy Lawyers Union) would react to this deliberate put down of GLBTETC would react?

    • http://www.piedmontwebmasterservices.com Dan

      I would love to see every male in the school wear a dress to the prom.

      • Jay

        I’m sure you would Dan, you lecherous old pervert!

      • Brad

        Jay,

        Dan was expressing his opinnion, so who’s mind is in the gutter this morning… You are expressing yours to teach all about the all encumpassing world of feminism. Would the ACLU back all the guys who wanted to “express their desire” to wear a dress to the prom?

        • Jay

          Hey Bradsky, I didn’t say that Dan was not allowed his opinion, I merely responded to his comment. Do you not see the difference? OMG!!! Chill dude!

          • Brad

            What’s wrong Jaysky, get your pantys in a bunch this morning…

          • Jay

            The Liberal despises masculinity as a symbol of individual power.

            Feminists groups are about lesbianism, socialism and hatred of men, not equal rights for women.

          • crystal

            Jay, your absolutely correct. Unfortunately, many of us are finding out too late. If anyone needs lobbyist and representation, it’s heterosexual men.

          • Brad

            Jay,

            Liberal, you are a funny man; I’m conservative and do believe that every one has a right to their own opinion. When someone says this to another “you lecherous old pervert”, I take offense and will stand up for that person. All the other person was trying to do was make a point about guys wearing dresses to the prom, because of the girl and you had to call him what you did.

            Jay, my mom is 72 and she would stand up for a woman any day of the week, does she believe in feminism, you betcha she does but on the flip side she will put a woman down if she believes the woman is wrong. Today to many people label others just becuase of what they say or do and never learn who they truely are. Is feminism alive and well, sure is, is it primarily rooted in the lesbian community, no it’s not, but it’s true some feminists hate lesbians and men in general and only socialize with like minded women.

      • spitfire

        Why so you could be looking under the skirts??????

        • Kinetic1

          No need, spitfire. Every good Scott knows what’s worn under the kilt. Nothing, it’s all in good working order.

          • CurtisS

            Every good Scott??? Scott is a male name… Scotch is a drink… a man from Scotland who wears a kilt is a Scot… one ‘T’. =)

    • Bus

      Just let a parent group sponsor the Prom and allow the school to stick to edumation of the little people. Then the dance wouldn’t be a state sponsored event and they could have any rules they wanted.

  • Jay

    The Absense of Equality in Feminism

    Prior to the examination of hypocracy in feminism it is necessary to look at the history of the movement.

    First Wave (1909-1960)
    Early feminism focused on the promotion of equal contract and property rights for women and the opposition to chattel marriage (a form of marriage in which the husband owned his wife in a legal relationship similar to that of slavery) and ownership of married women (and their children) by their husbands. By the end of the nineteenth century, activism focused primarily on gaining political power, particularly the right of women’s suffrage (the civil right to vote).

    Second Wave (1960-1980)
    Second-wave feminists saw women’s cultural and political inequalities as inextricably linked and encouraged women to understand aspects of their personal lives as deeply politicized and as reflecting sexist power structures. Associated with Second Wave is the phrase “Women’s Liberation” first used in 1964. By 1968, it was starting to refer to the whole women’s movement. Bra-burning also became associated with the movement. Due in large part to the media during the time feminists were viewed as women who typified clothing like brassiers as patriarchal, reducing women to the status of sex objects.

    Third Wave (1990-present)
    Beginning in the early 1990s, third wave feminism arose as a response to perceived failures of the second wave and also as a response to the backlash against initiatives and movements created by the second wave. Third-wave feminists often focus on “micro-politics” and challenge the second wave’s paradigm as to what is, or is not, good for females.

    The basic tenet of feminism since the beginning has been equality between the genders. The early suffragettes achieved legal equality by acquiring women the same right to vote as men. While the second wave champions moved mountains in terms of sexual equality it is unfortunately due to their intense efforts and the manipulation of these activities by the media that the term “feminist” often refers to a man-hating extremist. As with any subject matter, it is the select few who take the cause to the outer limits of its boundaries that appear in the media and are used to form the public and historical opinion of the entire group. With that said the current wave of feminism is attempting to undo the so-called damage that their earlier counterparts evoked.

    Exclusion of Men
    While equality is at the heart of feminism, the term is a contradiction in and of itself. Current feminism takes pride in welcoming men into the scene and in fact, some men even advocate for the cause and similarly refer to themselves as feminists. While most men are ready to advocate for equality between the genders, they are not ready to be called feminists. In the wise rhetorical questioning of the classmate: “if we want equality, why do we need a genre, discourse, term that on its very surface, excludes men?”

    Upon taking a more educated look at feminist theory, art, and the definition of the word itself, feminism is clearly inclusive of the male gender, but on its exterior, in the basic linguistic association of the word – it is not. Truly believing in that equality makes the term feminist, hypocritical. With that said, a term which encompasses the true nature of equality is – equalist.

    • Brad

      Jay,

      You forgot to discuss “Work place Feminism” where as any woman, but not all, use their god given gifts to get what they want whether they use a woman or a man, men being the primary target.

      • Jay

        Men being the primary target?

    • ValDM

      The hypocrisy in feminism is that it isn’t about “equality”, but has come to mean “superiority”. The game changed sometime in the mid-80s.

  • Eddie47d

    Society went crazy when women started wearing pant suits for every occasion.They said a woman belongs in a dress(and in the kitchen). We got over that and now it is a normal choice even though most women like wearing dresses. I’ve seen female waiters in tux like suits so it doesn’t seem to be a big issue. A women can look attractive and quite beautiful in a dress but not all jobs are fitting place to wear one. It’s also obvious that a woman can adapt to a shirt and pants scenario much better than a man could ever adapt to a dress. Dresses can be awkward to a woman and seemingly impossible for a man.

    • Brad

      Eddie47d,

      I agree with your statement this morning, normally we are at odds. You have seen what has evolved over the year’s as have my parents, I grew up in the late 60′s to early 80′s and what I grew up with is totaly different today. What hasn’t been addressed is a persons physical make, some women don’t look good in a dress (due to their body) but feel and look good in slacks and a blouse, then on the other hand a man in a dress, you know society is thinking something totaly different. Look at men who cross dress as women, in some cases you nor I can tell the difference, now that’s scary.

    • Raggs

      Ed… do you wear high heels?

    • independant thinker

      I am primarily Scotch-Irish and have often thought about getting a “man-dress” (Kilt). The reason I have not is the cost of researching family history to determine my plaid then getting an authintic one woven along with all the proper accessories including a fighting quality Claymore.

      • 45caliber

        independent:

        I have seen a catalog (from England) that supposedly contained ALL Scotish and Irish plaids that had been formally accepted. If you can identify your tartan, you can buy it there. And I know several places you can get a combat ready claymore. But which type of claymore do you want? Even the Scots argue about whether it means the two hander or the one hander. Just Google “sword” and you can get a lot of such sites.

      • Kinetic1

        IT,
        It’s not really that hard to find your families’ tartan, but choosing which you want can be a trial. Some families will have a dress, gathering and a hunting tartan and those will then be divided into ancient and modern, weathered and faded colorations. If it’s too hard to find your family, you could also choose a district tartan (assuming you know from which region of Scotland your family came) of even a universal tartan like Hunting Stewart, Black Watch, Caledonian, and Jacobite. Try http://www.tartans.scotland.net or http://www.USAkilts.com. Both have a large data base of tartans, but be prepared. As a decedent of clan Frasier I have over 20 sets to choose from! USA has the advantage of showing only those tartans that are currently milled in the UK, but be ready to spend some money. If you are not aware, man made fabrics will run you around $150 to $250 and traditional wool will add a couple of hundred more.

        By the by, those cold breezes will wake you up fast!

    • http://deleted Claire

      Pantsuits? Egads, I never wore them. They never appealed to me, especially the polyester material. I like skirts and nice blouses, sweaters, and dresses. However, all the women in my office wear pants. I wore a skirt one day last week and they looked at me like I was nuts. I will not wear pants in the dog show ring,I dress up like I am really going somewhere! I dress up because I want to WIN with my dog! lol

  • Raggs

    Is she going to wear a strap on under the Tux?

  • Jack Taylor

    I have a “sticker” I would like to send her-him? Still Queer and Loving It.

  • JimH

    Teens are dressing in different clothes all the time to stand out.
    If Belinda Sanchez would have just shown up on prom night in a tux without telling anyone or making a big deal about it before the dance, no one would care.
    It’s all a publicity stunt.

    • spitfire

      Sanchez??? Hmmm is she legally a citizen??

    • Kinetic1

      JimH,
      Once again someone posts assumptions due to a lack of information in the article and an apparent unwillingness to look for answers. Consider this excerpt from a Chicago paper:

      “In keeping with a school requirement that young women produce a photo of the dress they intend to wear, Ms. Sanchez met with Principal Milton Patch in March and notified him of her desire to wear a tuxedo. She selected the outfit because she thought it best represented who she is and how she expresses herself. Principal Hatch refused her request, saying that he didn’t want a “sideshow” at what he described as “his” prom and suggesting that she might want to wear something “more revealing” than a tuxedo.”

      One little search and we find that the story is not about an attention grabbing lesbian, but rather a principle who turns out to be a self important sexist creep. You can debate her choice of outfit all you want, but all she did was follow the rules.

      • JimH

        Kinetic1 So she shows a photo of a dress and shows up on prom night in a tux. You think all of the girls had the same dress they had a photo of?

        • Kinetic1

          JimH,
          Maybe your right, but that would have assumed that she knew that her tux would be a problem. Once she asked, showing him a dress alternative and then showing up in a tux could have caused a real problem. The point is she was following the school’s rules for attending prom but was singled out, not because she intended to wear something too low cut or too short, but because she wanted to be different. Add to this the fact that the principle suggested something “more revealing” and I just can’t imagine how anyone could stand up for the principle.

          • JimH

            Kinetic1, I just remember being a rebellius teenager. We were always looking for a angle to mess with the people “in charge.” I don’t know what Ms. Sanchez’s motives were, but I know what mine were.Hehehe.

          • Kinetic1

            Oh, I know what you mean. A group of us got together and ordered pizza delivered to the cafeteria and we all agreed to show up in some flamboyant way. A bunch skated in, others road bikes, but I was pushed in on my bed, still in pajamas. Nothing like Pizza in bed at school!

  • http://com i41

    As the nation pusified and became more whimpy to boys, what the hell did any one expect. As the victumology crap got rolling, social programs helped deteriate the families and since the blacks had more of the bs off of the poor slave crap constantly being feed to them as more blacks were raised as male missing communes. When the 60′s crap spread out the other people joined in the poor victunm bildge. The welfare rolls expanded greatly under the democrap training of Clower and Pevins. Go check out any welfare housing units and see what is prodominate blend of races are there. Just more bush man mental thinking and behaviors that perminates society. As the “feminist moovement” grew so were the push for a communist style of everyone is dressed the same and think every can be used what ever way is total fine.

  • spitfire

    Feminism and the ACLU suck bigtime! We can do better minus the two for sure.

  • The ‘American’

    All this is done in the name of ‘free speech and/or expression?????’ Well then, in the name of free ‘speech and expression’, why doesn’t Belinda Sanchez just accessorize the ‘tuxedo’ and round it out by strapping on a ten inch rubber ‘slogg’ to go inside the pants to make the outfit and the ‘illusion’ complete. If your going to falsly represent ‘whatever’, do it right, and make it complete!!!! I hope (Ms/Mr.???)Sanchez enjoys their 15 seconds of fame.

    • Kinetic1

      OK, we’ve established the fact that Ms. Sanchez is a lesbian, but how much does that have to do with what she will wear? What if a “straight” girl wanted to wear a tux? Anne Hathaway wore a tux while hosting the Academy Awards and she looked great! (Wish I could say the same for James Franco.) Back in the 30s Marlene Dietrich, Gloria Swanson and Katharine Hepburn could all be seen in tuxedos. Would you suggest that any of these women should have worn a “strap on”? Yves Saint Laurent designed a tux just for women in the 60s that is still very popular with fashionable women today. Why do you have to make lewd suggestions just because Ms. Snachez is a confessed lesbian?

      • 45caliber

        Kenetic:

        Just because you want watch a couple walking down the street and admire both of them, don’t think the rest of us fall into that category – or even want to. Sorry.

        • Kinetic1

          45,
          I don’t “admire” every couple that I see, but I appreciate those who I find admirable. I cringe when I see young parents covered in tattoos, the father with his pants down below his butt and the mother wearing pants and a dress together. On the other hand, it’s nice to see well dressed people, or an older couple holding hands. Do you see something wrong with that?

          • Carlucci

            I hate tattoos and face piercings, especially on women. I’ve seen a few young men who looked okay with a tattoo, but I always wonder what these people are going to look like when they are old.

          • http://deleted Claire

            Egads, I saw a lady at the hospital, she had a nose ring, earrings all around her ears, a tongue ring, one ring on each eyebrow, and 2 rings on her lips. Do they think they are really good-looking with all this garbage on their face? I am not into self-mutilation. I would think they would become infected, at least sore be as heck. Earrings, necklaces, bracelets, and ring are my fetish. Maybe a delicate tattoo would be okay in a discreet place.

          • http://?? Joe H.

            Claire,
            saw a lady the other day that had on hip huggers and a delicate little butterfly just above the belt line. she was very good looking and the tattoo didn’t detract from her looks at all. I have seen them with them all over and I have trouble looking at them. Especially if they have multiple piercings as well!!

      • crystal

        Anne Hathaway did not look good in a tux.

  • Carlucci

    This is a stunt for attention. Who cares what this dykie in her Nikes wants to wear to the prom? This kind of behavior couldn’t be as bad as the girl who had a baby at the prom in the restroom, and then threw the baby in the trash.

    • http://deleted Claire

      Carlucci—Ahhh, I remember my prom dresses. They were beautiful. In fact, I still have them, stored away with my wedding gown. It was a wonderful era, simple and fun. Staying out all night, drinking PBR (I couldn’t drink beer, made me sick) drag races, L&M cigarettes, dancing and prancing. Never heard of drugs.

      • http://?? Joe H.

        PBR?? Isn’t that pabst blue ribbon?? Beer???

        • http://deleted Claire

          JoeH– Hey!!! You got it! Pabst Blue Ribbon beer!! Vile-tasting stuff! I got deathly sick on it once and never drank again. I honestly thought I was going to die, plus the fact my Mother put the fear of God in me that night when I got “caught.”

      • libertytrain

        were definitely fun times – :)

      • Carlucci

        Claire – I remember my prom dresses, too. There were only two of them because my school only had a junior and senior prom. My parents still have the pictures. I was a sophomore dating a gorgeous junior who was my first true love. I went to his prom with him. My senior prom dress was totally bitchin’. I got it at a very trendy store called “Backstreet” in the Houston Galleria (our version of Rodeo Drive). I don’t even remember who I went to my senior prom with – I just remember the dress!

        I’m with you on the jewelry thing. I love rings, bracelets, earrings, etc. Pearls are a big favorite. My nieces always ask me if they can have my jewelry after I die. They can’t wait to get their hands on the 24K stuff I got in the middle east. With the way things are going in this nation, I might have to hock them just to eat! :(

        • http://deleted Claire

          I went to my first prom when I was a sophomore, went with a kid that was a Junior. When I was a Junior I went with a nice guy. THEN, when I was a Senior, I went with my husband, although at the time I did not realize I was going to marry him!

  • Raggs

    I seen a guy? I think it was anyway walking in town that was wearing pants and the crouch was dragging the ground…

  • Raggs

    One question that everyone has failed to ask…

    How will obamas muslims react?

  • http://deleted Claire

    Personally, I like women to look like women and be women. I like men to be men and look like men. However, in this day and age, anything goes. Wonder how this girl will feel and think if and when she becomes elderly. She got what she wanted–15 minutes of fame and we are adding to her so-called “popularity.” She has announced to the world she is a lesbian, what I am supposed to do? Congratulate her? I don’t think so. Besides, I could care less what she does with her life. If this is what she has chosen to be, then so be it. I am straight and PROUD of it. Call me what you want, I have no room in my life for these shenanigans.

  • http://gunner689 gunner689

    Oh good, just what the World needs. Another dyke/

  • The ‘American’

    Kinetic 1. —– A specific design or ‘Style’ is one thing. As you pointed out, other ‘famous’ women have worn tuxedos, and usually they were designed for them in ‘playing out a role’. The role of Victor in Victor Victoria that Julie Andrews played is a perfect example. On the other hand, Ms. Sanchez was trying to make a ‘social statement’—– at a PROM???. There is a real big difference. The bottom line is; who really cared what she is? Whatever is her ‘preference’ is hers alone. My personal opinion is; there is a time and a place for everything, and to display specific social behavior at certain events that NOT EVERYONE may be of the same mindset, is in very poor taste, and classless. That is a display of totally not caring about anyone else’s feelings or views around her but her own. I wonder how many people were REALLY comfortable with ‘the message and display’ at their once in a lifetime event?That ‘I/ME’ syndrome is what gets a lot of people in some real uncomfortable situations. The law may mandate a certain ‘political correctness’ stance towards sexual preferences, but it cannot ever mandate or control someones true inner feelings. The old saying “you have won the battle, but lost the war” is very true.

    • crystal

      Excellent comment!

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