FBI Too Big For Current Facilities

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The FBI is housed in the J. Edgar Hoover Building, which occupies an entire city block on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C.

According to the FBI, its exponential growth since 2001 has rendered its headquarters too small for the agency. The agency is housed in the J. Edgar Hoover Building, which occupies an entire city block on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C.

The Government Accountability Office (GAO) said Tuesday that the FBI will have to soon begin considering plans to grow its space through relocation or renovation of the current building. Both options will take years and probably reach into the billions of dollars, according to The Washington Post.

FBI Assistant Deputy Director T.J. Harrington said that a new consolidated FBI headquarters facility is urgently needed and viewed as one of FBI officials’ highest priorities for the foreseeable future.

Besides the J. Edgar Hoover Building, the FBI’s staff of about 17,300 employees and contractors work at 40 other sites throughout the country. Twenty-two of the sites are in the Washington, D.C., area, according to the report.

A recent GAO report indicated that in addition to the FBI running out of space, security of FBI facilities is lacking. Many FBI offices are in busy areas or share space with other lessees in multi-tenant buildings.

According to the article, the cheapest option the FBI has to complete a renovation of facilities will cost more than $850 million.

Personal Liberty

Sam Rolley

Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After covering community news and politics, Rolley took a position at Personal Liberty Media Group where could better hone his focus on his true passions: national politics and liberty issues. In his daily columns and reports, Rolley works to help readers understand which lies are perpetuated by the mainstream media and to stay on top of issues ignored by more conventional media outlets.

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