EU Plan Would Set 70 MPH Speed Limiters In All European Cars

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A proposal before the Mobility and Transport Department of the European Commission would require all new cars sold in the European Union to be fitted with speed limiting devices that would restrain vehicles from traveling at more than 70 miles per hour.

The plan could outfit new cars with cameras that read posted speed limit signs on roadsides and relay the information to a computer, which would moderate excessive speed by applying a car’s brakes without driver control.

According to Britain’s The Telegraph, the “scheme would work either using satellites, which would communicate limits to cars automatically, or using cameras to read road signs. Drivers can be given a warning of the speed limit, or their speed could be controlled automatically under the new measures.”

Like the comical porn ban proposed before the EU earlier this year, the speed-policing plan is still in development and could face a strong headwind in some member nations. One unnamed British government source said the country’s Transport Secretary is opposed to the idea because it violates motorists’ freedoms. “This has Big Brother written all over it and is exactly the sort of thing that gets people’s backs up about Brussels.”

Brussels is the unofficial seat of most EU central operations, although the pan-European organization has no official capital.

The European Commission’s Mobility and Transport Department announced the measure as a top-down effort to do something about highway safety in member nations, though there is a wide disparity in traffic safety statistics from one country to the next. The proposal would even go so far as to retrofit older vehicles so that they, too, would comply with the forced top speed.

Safety – one of the state’s greatest weapons.

Ben Bullard

Reconciling the concept of individual sovereignty with conscientious participation in the modern American political process is a continuing preoccupation for staff writer Ben Bullard. A former community newspaper writer, Bullard has closely observed the manner in which well-meaning small-town politicians and policy makers often accept, unthinkingly, their increasingly marginal role in shaping the quality of their own lives, as well as those of the people whom they serve. He argues that American public policy is plagued by inscrutable and corrupt motives on a national scale, a fundamental problem which individuals, families and communities must strive to solve. This, he argues, can be achieved only as Americans rediscover the principal role each citizen plays in enriching the welfare of our Republic.