Does Harry Reid Hear What He’s Saying?

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Close on the heels of his observation that Congressional Republicans must be a bunch of anarchists, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) said Wednesday the House GOP is “trying to get rid of” the government.

Bristling at the House GOP’s forthcoming plan to defund Obamacare by attaching a proviso to its stopgap government-funding bill, Reid struck a particularly condescending tone.

“We’re waiting to see what comes from the House on whether to fund the government or not,” Reid said. “Waiting to see what the House is going to do — to see what absurd idea will prevail over there.”

Apparently a believer that even a nursery rhyme could sound sinister if it’s recited in an appropriately alarming voice, Reid also accused Republicans of something many true conservatives — without the added hyperbole — embrace as a virtue.

“We have a number of Republican Senators and lots of Republican House members who don’t believe in government,” he said from the Senate floor Wednesday. “They want to get rid of it, and they’re doing everything they can to get rid of it.”

Yeah, guess that’s why they’re mostly career politicians. Reid’s Republicans are a bunch of radical ideologues willing to get elected so that they can subvert the system from within, like sneaky nihilistic ninjas.

But how, even in Reid’s view, does accusing conservative lawmakers of advocating for limited government sound like something that would resonate with all but the stupidest of Americans? Only the strident language makes it sound like a bad thing. And only a child would take emotional cues from the form, and not the content, of a message.

Maybe Reid is hoping there are enough functional illiterates out there who can be persuaded by his words so that the Democrats’ inevitable victory over raising the Federal debt limit can be reported on television to look like a mandate from the people.

Ben Bullard

Reconciling the concept of individual sovereignty with conscientious participation in the modern American political process is a continuing preoccupation for staff writer Ben Bullard. A former community newspaper writer, Bullard has closely observed the manner in which well-meaning small-town politicians and policy makers often accept, unthinkingly, their increasingly marginal role in shaping the quality of their own lives, as well as those of the people whom they serve. He argues that American public policy is plagued by inscrutable and corrupt motives on a national scale, a fundamental problem which individuals, families and communities must strive to solve. This, he argues, can be achieved only as Americans rediscover the principal role each citizen plays in enriching the welfare of our Republic.