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Do You Remember the Pueblo?

January 21, 2011 by  

Do You Remember the Pueblo?

Can you believe there was a time when we caved to the communists of North Korea and let them capture, beat and torture some of our sailors? This weekend marks the 42nd anniversary of one of the most shameful episodes in recent United States history. And I doubt if the mainstream media will contain a single word about it.

Several years ago, my youngest son and I were watching a program on the History Channel when the program’s narrator mentioned the capture of a U.S. Naval vessel by Communist North Korea back in 1968.

“That didn’t really happen, did it, Dad?” my son asked me. When I replied that it had, he was stunned. “Do you mean to tell me that North Korea seized one of our ships, beat and tortured the crew for most of a year, and we didn’t do anything about it?”

I was shocked that my son had never heard of the USS Pueblo before and embarrassed that the answer to his question was “yes.” Somehow, that whole sorry episode had been blotted out of the history books. I wonder how many of you reading these pages now know the story. How about your children or grandchildren? Do any of them remember the Pueblo?

Happily, I could do better than just issue a mealy-mouthed reply about how this country “protested vigorously.” At the time, many of us did everything possible to get our leaders to act. When the sailors were finally released I helped arrange a nationwide speaking tour for one of them, radio officer Lee R. Hayes. Lee gave hundreds of speeches and participated in thousands of media interviews. Here’s part of the story he told.

The ship that became the Pueblo was originally launched in 1944 as Army cargo ship FS-344. In 1966 it was transferred to the Navy and renamed the Pueblo. It began service as a light cargo ship, but in 1967 it was redesignated GER-2 and was converted into an intelligence-gathering ship. (GER stood for General Environmental Research, a euphemism for spying operations the ship would conduct on behalf of the National Security Agency.)

In January 1968, the Pueblo was ordered to patrol off the east coast of communist North Korea to conduct surveillance of Soviet naval activity in the Tsushima Straits. The ship was also ordered to eavesdrop on any electronic transmissions it could intercept that originated in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, as that communist captive called itself.

Within hours of reaching its destination, the Pueblo was harassed by Soviet or North Korean vessels. On Jan. 21, the ship reported that a modified Soviet-style sub-chaser passed within two miles of its bow. The next day, two apparent fishing trawlers from North Korea (which were probably Soviet spy ships) passed within 25 yards of the Pueblo. Any seaman reading this will know that this dangerously close encounter had to have been intentional.

On Jan. 23, a sub-chaser accosted the Pueblo and demanded to know its identity. In response, Commanding Officer Lloyd M. Bucher ordered that the U.S. flag be raised. The North Korean vessel then ordered the ship to stand down or be fired upon.

Instead, the Pueblo followed the orders it had been given back in Japan and tried to leave the area. It could not outrun the sub-chaser, however. Shortly thereafter, three torpedo boats appeared on the horizon and joined in the chase. The attackers were subsequently joined by two MiG-21 jet fighters. Soon, a fourth torpedo boat and a second sub-chaser appeared on the horizon.

The North Koreans pulled alongside the Pueblo and tried to board the ship. When Bucher ordered the Pueblo to take evasive maneuvers, two North Korean vessels opened fire on the ship. Suddenly, cannon fire and machine-gun bullets were raking the vessel.

The Pueblo was ill prepared to withstand such an attack. Its armament consisted of two Browning .50-caliber machine guns — hardly a match for rockets and missiles. Moreover, the machine guns were wrapped in cold-weather tarpaulins and the ammunition for them was stored below decks.

As the cannon fire continued, Bucher gave the order to “stop engines” and signaled the North Koreans that he would comply with their orders. He also ordered his own crewmen to begin destroying as much of the sensitive materiel as possible that was on board the ship.

The North Koreans ordered the Pueblo to follow them to the mainland. At first, the ship complied. But again — following orders it had been given in Japan — the ship stopped before it crossed the 12-mile limit into North Korean waters.

When this happened, the North Koreans once again opened fire on the ship. This time, one sailor — Fireman Apprentice Duane Hodges — was killed. North Korean soldiers from a torpedo boat and sub-chaser boarded the Pueblo. Our sailors were blindfolded and had their hands tied behind their backs. Once they were helpless they were beaten and prodded with bayonets.

In a subsequent inquiry we learned that the Pueblo had been in radio contact with Naval security back in Japan throughout the incident. The Seventh Fleet command told Bucher that help was on the way. It turns out this was a lie; no jets or ships were ever dispatched to come to the aid of the ship.

No one at Seventh Fleet headquarters was willing to give the order to try to rescue the Pueblo. The decision was bucked back to Washington — first to the Pentagon, then to the White House. By the time then-President Lyndon Johnson was informed of the situation, the Pueblo was in North Korean waters. It was decided that any rescue attempt would be too dangerous. So the world’s most powerful military kowtowed to one of the weakest. I’m still ashamed of our leaders’ pitiful response.

There is considerable controversy about where the Pueblo was when it was captured. Bucher and the other ship’s officers subsequently testified under oath that at no time did the Pueblo enter within 12 nautical miles of the North Korean coast. This is the generally accepted limit of claims for territorial waters. At the time, however, the North Koreans claimed a 50-nautical-mile sea boundary. No one disputes that the Pueblo was within 50 miles of the Korean coast.

In any case, once the ship was within 12 miles of North Korea, the Pueblo was boarded again — this time by some high-ranking North Korean officials. (Interesting that they waited until they could be certain the ship would not be attacked by U.S. forces. They undoubtedly were aware that, if the situation were reversed, Korean dictator Kim Il-Sung and his minions wouldn’t hesitate to blow one of their own ships to smithereens, killing all hands on board, rather than suffer the embarrassment of capture.)

They took the Pueblo into port at Wonsan on the eastern coast of North Korea. Then they took the 82 surviving U.S. crewmembers to a prisoner-of-war camp somewhere in the interior of the country. The men were starved and repeatedly tortured. (Their treatment got worse when someone realized that crewmen were secretly giving them “the finger” in staged propaganda photos.)

Bucher was singled out for particularly harsh treatment, including facing a mock firing squad. He refused to buckle when faced with his own death, but finally relented and agreed to sign a confession when his captors threatened to murder his crewmen, one by one, in front of him.

Since his captors couldn’t read English, Bucher was ordered to write his own confession. None of the North Koreans picked up on a play on words that Bucher included in his “confession.” He wrote, “We paean the North Korean state. We paean their great leader, Kim Il Sung.” (Read aloud, “we paean” sounds remarkably like “we pee on.” Get it? Good for you, Commander.)

During the course of 1968, the men were moved to a second prisoner-of-war camp, while negotiations for their release dragged on.Finally, in December of that year — 11 long months after the Pueblo was captured — the United States issued a written apology to North Korea, acknowledged that the ship was spying and promised that it would not happen again.

On Dec. 23, 1968, the crew of the Pueblo was taken by bus to the demilitarized zone separating Communist North Korea from the South, where the men were permitted to walk across “the Bridge of No Return.” Bucher led the long line of crewmen, with his second-in-command, Executive Officer Lt. Ed Murphy, bringing up the rear.

Once the officers and crew reached safety in South Korea, the United States retracted its admission, apology and assurance.

In the aftermath of the collapse of the Soviet Union we learned that the capture of the Pueblo was instigated by the Soviet Union, which very badly wanted a cryptographic machine that was on board. John Anthony Walker, an American traitor who provided the Soviets with thousands of secrets, had given them a key to deciphering our ciphers; now they needed to get their hands on an actual machine. Seizing the Pueblo provided that opportunity.

Bucher and the 81 other surviving officers and crew were ordered to face a Naval Court of Inquiry, which concluded by recommending that Bucher and Lieutenant Steve Harris (the officer in charge of the intelligence equipment on board the ship) be court-martialed for their “dereliction of duty.” As far as I can determine, there was no action taken against the Naval officers in Japan who lied to Bucher about sending help.

Secretary of the Navy John H. Chafee rejected the Naval Court’s recommendation, saying that, “They have suffered enough.” Bucher was never found guilty of any malfeasance and remained on active duty until his retirement. He died in 2004, partly as a result of complications from the injuries he received while he was a prisoner of war in North Korea.

During the inquiry there was some debate about whether or not Bucher acted within his orders. He admitted that part of his orders were “not to spark an international incident.” But he and his officers were adamant that they had not come within 12 nautical miles of the Korean coast. (Today, of course, global positioning satellites could have confirmed the ship’s location within a matter of inches.)

Some critics argued that the ship should have left the area after the first incident. But such encounters were considered routine at the time. U.S. forces frequently tested the territorial limits of Cold War opponents. If such actions caused the enemy to mobilize its military, there would be even more information to gather.

In October 1999, the Pueblo was moved from Wonsan on the east coast of North Korea to Nampo on the west coast. The trip required moving the vessel through international waters for several days, as it was towed around the coast of South Korea. Although the U.S. military had to have been aware of the Pueblo’s location, no effort was made to capture or sink the ship. To the best of my knowledge, there was never a court of inquiry — or any embarrassing questions at a White House press conference — about this failure to act.

The Pueblo subsequently was taken to Pyongyang, the North Korean capital, where it is now the most popular tourist attraction in the city. Thousands of visitors have been shown the ship’s secret communications room, still in a partially disassembled state from when the ship was seized. A popular souvenir of a visit, I’m told, is a photograph taken while a tourist stands behind the machine gun mounted at the rear of the ship. Yes, the same guns that remained wrapped in a tarpaulin during the attack and seizure.

To this day, the USS Pueblo remains a commissioned vessel of the United States Navy. It is sad that it has been abandoned by our leaders. But it would be tragic if its story was forgotten by our citizens.

Until next time, keep some powder dry.

–Chip Wood

Much of this material originally appeared in an article I wrote in 2008 for The New American (www.thenewamerican.com), one of my favorite conservative news magazines

Chip Wood

is the geopolitical editor of PersonalLiberty.com. He is the founder of Soundview Publications, in Atlanta, where he was also the host of an award-winning radio talk show for many years. He was the publisher of several bestselling books, including Crisis Investing by Doug Casey, None Dare Call It Conspiracy by Gary Allen and Larry Abraham and The War on Gold by Anthony Sutton. Chip is well known on the investment conference circuit where he has served as Master of Ceremonies for FreedomFest, The New Orleans Investment Conference, Sovereign Society, and The Atlanta Investment Conference.

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  • Bill

    As unfortunate as it was, this remains an intricate episode of our military history. The cowardice and deception revealed by the higher command creates present day credibility issues for those that must follow orders in the chain of command.Bucher and his crew were heroes that followed orders and paid the price for doing so. I doubt that things have changed that much today,if the U.S. were to find itself in a similar situation. I have serious doubts about Barry’s decision making ability,an particularly to his lack of military experience.Yes, you are probably thinking that is why he has advisers,well Johnson had advisers also and look where that got us.

    • wayne

      That was a pathetic time in our history. This president did not have any guts, or any sense at all. I can assure you that had I been a president we would have been bombing the North Koreans immediately. I would have bombed them with everything this country had. Thas is why we are still having problems with them. We showed our coward side, and now they are taking advantage f it. Yes! I don’t doubt that Obama would not be any different. We need need to be fair, but firm in our principles

      • Richard Walker

        Wayne, LBJ was a cowardly turd just like Obama. I graduated from the Basic School in Quantico (USMC) in June of 1969, and Gen. Lewis B Walt was our commencement speaker. He was the Marine Commander in Vietnam under Westmoreland. He told our class that he was proud of us, but we were about to go to a war that was fought by politicians from Washington. He said that if the military were to be released to fight the war as it knows how to fight, the war would have been over in 3 months. As we now know over 55,000 Americans died in vain due to the cowardice of Johnson and his liberal Democratic “leadership”. The Pueblo was just another example of how the Democrats conduct war, and the crew was made to suffer for their cowardice. Had I been a member of the crew, I would have sued everyone concerned for incompetence. Especially disgusting is the non-reaction of the chain of command of the Navy.

        • wayne

          I agree with you 100 percent, Richard. Johnson would only allow the military go so far north, and then he would stop them. He wouuld not allow our military bomb the capital of North Vietnam. How do these cowardly creeps get voted in office is something I’ll never understand. Yes, this war would not have lasted very long had the military been allowed to do what they are trained to do, and that is to fight the enemy. North Vietnam was almost identical to North Korea, Incidently, my brother fought in North Korea as well as in WW2. I did not go in the military until 1956. That was the year I turned 18. Truman wold not allow our Military go beyond the 38th parallel while fighting the North Koreans. General McArthur wanted to go into North Korea, and into China as the Chinese had a lot of soldiers fighting along the North Koreans. President Truman ended up firing General McAthur for wanting to take the fight further north. Remember, in both of these wars we had Democrats for our president. Need I say more.

          • IRA

            “”How do these cowardly creeps get voted in, I’ll never understand”" Answer is they get voted in by cowardly creeps. How else did you expect??? Ira

          • I hate Jane Fonda!

            WAIT A MINUTE GUYS!You mean to tell me that progressive politicians are soft on military matters?SAY IT AINT SO!Ever notice that total political disasters are often caused by liberal Democtratic progressives in the name of policy?Let’s list a few we know about…hmmmm.The escalation of conflict in Viet Nam,Johnson,progressive.Led to around 58,000 deaths.The afore-mentioned Pueblo incident.ditto,ditto.The massacre at Waco,Clinton,progressive. Led to hundreds of deaths in Oklahoma City at the hands of an angry Timothy McVeigh.The massacre of Army Rangers,Mogadishu Somalia.Clinton,progressive.The allowing the escape of Osama Bin Laden, from camp in Afghanistan,Clinton,progressive.Led to 3000+ deaths at the hands of Al Qeida terrorists.Conveniently blamed upon the Bush administration.This is not even mentioning the cost of pre-Kennedy progressivism on the United States and the World.So there you have it,a blueprint to why you should always vote for a progressive candidate folks!

          • http://Illinois'17th Old Henry

            Wayne:

            Dirt-bag cowards like LBJ got elected because our parents and grandparents did not pay any more attention than we do today, which gave us scum like old d*ck-for-brains and Little Barry.

            The more things change, the more they stay the same.

          • http://Illinois'17th Old Henry

            Dear I Hate Jane Fonda:

            Don’t feel like the Lone Ranger. The only reason that b*tch is still above ground is due to the fact that the vets have too much honor to stoop to her level.

            Several years ago I worked with a Ret. “Full Bird” Colonel who told me that if he was ever in the same room with her he would leave to get his pistol, go back and shoot that gd b*tch. He had served during that period.

            Oh, don’t forget FDR. He sacrificed almost 3.000 GIs to get us into WWII. My parents hated that SOB.

          • independant thinker

            What guarenteed LBJs election was him promising to not enlarge the war in Vietnam while Goldwater said we need to either go in with everything we have to win or get out now. All the voters heard was go in with everything we got. Of course as soon as he was re-elected the first thing he did was enlarge our presence in Vietnam while continuing to let politicians run the war.

        • bob wire

          Well, you are entitled to your opinions Walker. ~ but think your party affiliation bias has rotted your brain.

          August 2010
          Senior News, by Charles j. Hanley

          Trapped by two Chinese divisions ,troops of the 8th US Calvary Regiment were left to die in far north Korea, abandoned by the US command in a Korean War episode viewed as one of the most troubling in American military history.

          Sixth years later those fallen soldiers, the lost battalion of Unsan, are stranded anew.

          North Korea is offering fresh clues to their remains. American teams are ready to re-enter the north to dig for them. But for five years the Us government has refused to work with the North Korea to recover the men of Unsan and others among more then 8,000 US missing in action from the 1950-53 war.”

          This pales the USS Pueblo incident in comparison and not surprising little attention is offered or wants to be offered.

          “Now, under pressure from MIA family groups the Obama administration is said to be moving to reverse the Bush adminstration’s supension of the joint recovery program, a step taken in 2005 as the North Korean nuclear crisis dragged on.”

          We are left to understand and accept War is a messy business and glory is not always yours to have.

          If you were coming out of base camp an E2 in 69, you missed the big party. But no matter, the honor of serving is your to have.

          • http://donthaveone Beberoni

            Your not looking at the whole picture Bob, just like a good liberal. What kind of attachments did the Koreans have in order for us to go over there and find our remains. Just because you on the left feel it is ok to give away all kinds of things to get what you want, doesnt make it right. You dont know what they were asking in return for doing this now, do you? No, you dont. You lefties will get into bed with anyone, as witness, one George Soros, the most anti American on the planet next to Ahminajed and Kim Il Jung. The right isnt willing to do that, thank God, and I hope they never end up stooping that low.

          • Harold

            LBJ was scum, he would now allow US fighter jets go to the rescue of the USS Liberty while they were under attack. That gave the N. Koreans the guts to go after the Pueblo, same scum at 1600….

          • bob wire

            “Beberoni says:
            January 24, 2011 at 3:14 pm

            “Your not looking at the whole picture Bob, just like a good liberal. What kind of attachments did the Koreans have in order for us to go over there and find our remains. Just because you on the left feel it is ok to give away all kinds of things to get what you want, doesnt make it right.”

            Hmm? well Beberoni, just like a good “ditto head” you missed the whole point of the posting with some feeble attempt to attach a “political” blame game for your personal satisfaction.

            That the 8th Calvary was abandoned, left to f king fight to the last man standing ~ should kick the Pueblo incident into obscurity.

            And if you feel the need to blame someone, starting at the top and going down, Truman, Eisenhower, Mc Authur, one democrat and two republicans.

        • bob wire

          ” Two of the 8th Cavalry’s three battalions managed to escape, with heavy losses. But only small bands from the five companies of the doomed 3rd Battalion made it out as waves of Chinese infantry attacked their 200 yard wide defense perimeter.

          The 8th Cavalry’s abandonment at Unsan became an infamous chapter in Army annals, “one of the most shameful and little-known incidents in US military history” wrote Korean Historian Jack J. Gifford.

          ” Some of 600 of the 3rd battalion’s 800 men were lost, about half believed killed and the rest captured and died in Chinese-ran prison camps.”

          • http://Illinois'17th Old Henry

            Bob Wire:

            That was very interesting. I had never heard the story.

            Did it happen under Truman, or Ike?

          • bob wire

            Hmm? this occurred in early Nov. of 50, so it would have to be Truman.

            http://www.foxnews.com/world/2010/07/18/years-ponders-korea-mia-decision-unsans-lost-battalion-waits-come-home/

            History accounts say High Command, led by McAuther was to blame, refusing to believe intel that the Chinese was driving south in large number and placing the 8th too far north while refusing them artillery support.

            You can blame Truman if you wish, being a democrat and all.

          • Dogma-Free Too

            And I believe it was Ike whose tough-talk was responsible for starting the Vietnam conflict.

            But, yeah…that’s the great thing about a two party system…the one side gets to conveniently blame the other side, and vice-versa.

            In truth (especially after WWII), I would think it’s whoever tells the presidents what to do, and they probably could care less if they’re republican or democratic presidents, just as long as they keep making the real people in charge, even more rich.

            I think that may be why they felt communism was such an ultimate threat to their whole plan. They needed the free-market system, so they could build the banks up, and then later…collapse them when the time was right.

            Of course, I’m just guessing…but it would seem fairly obvious that the middle class is disappearing, and I doubt that’s by accident.

            Oh, and as for the USS Pueblo…if the men were caught spying, they were lucky they weren’t just shot.

        • Mike In MI

          Richard Walker –
          You noted the common government allowed numbers of Viet Nam American dead. Due to an experience I had in 1968 during Tet on a visit to the Danang morgue I think it at least reasonable to double that number.
          I seriously doubt that they tell us the truth about anything anymore. If a matter is something we would have difficulty verifying for ourselves and they can deny us access to their records…well, they just lie. Unless we can someday force them to open their books we’re done. No free system can long endure when everything is lies and, who knows what kind of hidden, fraud. Rule, yes. Govern, NOT. Look at Chris Dodd, Bawnie Phwanque and Chas. Rangel, Phwanquin Wains, etc.
          It’s all a way to avoid responsibility. No government will long govern where there is no accountability and, therefore, no responsbility.
          Like Goe. Washington is reported to have said: “It is impossible to govern without God.” – the One he knew (who hasn’t been in vogue hee for a long, long time. Doubt that?: Read Luke’s accounts in Acts.

          • http://workingonthat.com Billy Jumper

            The Korea debacle happened under Truman. He fired McArthur because Mac was refusing to stand down. Truman knew from his intelligence that the only way to save South Korea was at the table. The U.S. military had no answer for the millions upon millions (literally) of Chinese soldiers in “human wave” attacks. By the way, the bombs were not the answer to the Japanese. The Japanese were already finished and ready to surrender. The bombs were a show for the Russians and the beginning of the Cold War.

          • http://workingonthat.com Billy Jumper

            Bible quoting is so irrelevant. Religion and money and power are the three reasons for wars in that order.

          • independant thinker

            “The Japanese were already finished and ready to surrender.”

            History has proven that to NOT be the case. The Japanese were prepared to arm the civilian population and fight to the death of their nation. the military did not want to give up even after the second bomb but the emperor “put his foot down” and said enough is enough surrender. The military backed down and agreed to give up because of the almost god like reverence they had for the emperor.

          • http://deleted Claire

            During WWII I was less than one year old at the time. But I have read enough history and to put it in a nutshell, I am glad the bombs were dropped. To some this may sound cruel and heartless but after what happened at Pearl Harbor, we had no choice. Perhaps I am wrong in thinking this way, but it sure put a stop to Japan’s insanity. There is no doubt in my mind that Japan would have started in on the U.S. “Talking” to the enemy will go only “just so far.” There comes a time when America has to take whatever measure to protect our soldiers and homeland. I place our soldiers and homeland first and I would protect them with every fiber of my being, I would use every method/weaponry available. I am not a warmonger, but I will do what is necessary to protect America and my fellow man. I would tread lightly and cautiously but I would certainly carry a big stick. I despise being in a weakened condition. I despise having to rely on China or any other country for our economic well-being.

          • http://donthaveone Beberoni

            Note to Billy Jumper. The only way to peace, is through war. If your not willing to fight for your freedom, your not going to have it. And your going to need to keep fighting for it, because there is always someone trying to take it from you. Now you blame religion. Was World War 1 because of religion? No. Was World War 2? No. Was the Korean War? No. Was Vietnam? No. Sarajevo? No. Iraq 1 and 2? No and yes. Their religious ideals want to force everyone in the world to practice their religion. We are not going to stand for it. So your off base blaming religion for war. Only the old wars from the Bible were over religion, as God delivered his own people, the Jews, over to their enemies again and again for disobediance to him. And they are still persecuted this day for their disobediance in not recognizing Jesus Christ. But your assertations of religion cause wars is all bunk. All these wars I mentioned above, plus the Civil War, the Spanish American war, and many others, had nothing at all to do with religion. You have an ax to burn against Christianity and are willing to blame all wars on it is your angle I imagine. Is this so? Because as you plainly see above, all these wars had nothing to do with religion.

        • http://Illinois'17th Old Henry

          Mr. Walker:
          Bravo. Well said and thank you for your service.

        • Jerry Courtney

          Exactly correct Richard. I wonder if the history books in our schools today depict the Vietnam “conflict” as it was really conducted.

          • http://workingonthat.com Billy Jumper

            No. U.S. history is written not by the text book writers. They write mythology…greatest country in the world…all good people…heroes…glorious victories, etc. History is written by private authors when they write books deemed best sellers.

          • Dan Richardson

            Here are some comments about our wars and a few other events and the causes why we have been involved and “LOST” so many of our troops….
            Please read: Forgotten’ war winner? There wasn’t one, now…

            The Korean War has not been forgotten! Oh yes there was a winner…. Read on.

            I’m sure there are many Veterans of Korea that still have nightmares of their experiences and have
            wondered why things happened as they did.

            Perhaps you may ponder a few of these unsettling questions concerning our military: How and why did
            the U.S. lose the war in Korea? Why weren’t our POWs returned from Korea and Vietnam? Whatever
            happened to Congress’ sole right to declare war? Should U.S. troops be sent all over the world on UN
            missions? Why has the ban against homosexuals in our services been scrapped? What was the real
            purpose of George Bush’s Gulf War?

            As a young boy growing up on Lake Greenwood near Coronaca in Greenwood County, South Carolina,
            I had a Hero. He was a leader of men, an honorable soldier, a victor in time of war, He was General Douglas MacAuthur.

            Our motto should be: Duty, honor, country: Those three hallowed words reverently dictate what you ought to be, what you can be, what you will be. They are your rallying point to build courage when courage seems to fail, to regain faith when there seems to be little cause for faith, to create hope when hope becomes forlorn as quoted by Gen. Douglas MacArthur (1962)

            I questioned for years how President Truman could relieve this Honorable Commander. During the years 1967- 68 while stationed in South East Asia during the Viet Nam war I became curious of some tactics employed by our military. It was not until my assignment to HQ’s Alaskan Air Command in 1972 that I discovered facts that did not bear favorable to some of our Presidents and others in charge of our armed services. To acknowledge the truth when confronted with the different “facts” presented by our schools, newspapers, magazines and television was very diffuclt. My father, Dan “Red” Richardson, admired Gen Eisenhouser and supported his bid for president. I remember dad giving me an “I Like IKE” presidential Campaign button which I wore proudly! But, after reading “the Politician”, I began to realize history had been distorted.

            “It is natural to man to indulge in the illusions of hope. We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth, and listen to the song of that siren, till she transforms us into beasts. Is this the part of wise men, engaged in a great and arduous struggle for liberty? Are we disposed to be of the number of those who, having eyes, see not, and having ears, hear not, the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst and to provide for it.”
            Patrick Henry (1775)

            The despicable General William Tecumseh Sherman who caused the burning, raping and looting much of the south during the war of Northern Aggression is credited with saying “ War is Hell!” The goal or purpose in War is to WIN! Anyone who has ever participated in war should concur!

            The United Nations Headquartered in New York seated a Delegate from Nationalist China (Taiwan) on January 19, 1950. This was an excuse for Soviet General Vasilev, Chairman of the UN’s Military Staff Committee and several other Russian officials to storm out of their offices in protest.

            General Vasilev proceeded immediately to North Korea and began directing the military buildup of North Korea’s communists forces. A Department of Defense release dated May 15, 1954 claimed that Vasilev actually gave the order for the North Koreans to attack South Korea on June 25, 1950. Vasilev’s replacement Soviet Geneneral Ivan Skliaro and his comrades soon returned to their posts at the UN.

            The Korean War was fought under the auspices of the United Nations, like Viet Nam, the Persian Gulf and the intervention in Somalia, Bosnia, etc.

            During, what President Truman refered to as “police action” all military orders and directives sent from Washington and the Pentagon to American commanders in Korea were first supplied to several offices at UN headquarters, including those of the Military Staff Committee headed by Soviet General Skliaro before being forwarded to Korea. Traitorous

            These orders were subject to approval by these Communists persons at the UN who actually had authority to amend them. General Vasilev in North Korea received them from his Soviet comrades perhaps even sooner than did our own commanders in the field. General Lin Piao, the commander of the Red Chinese troops boasted in a leaflet distributed in China, “l would never have made the attack and risked my men and military reputation if I had not been assured that Washington would restrain General MacArthur from taking adequate retaliatory measures against my lines of supply and communication.”

            The communist forces knew what orders our troops were to follow all during the war! And they knew that, no matter what happened, U.S. and South Korean troops would have their hands tied. Traitorous!

            With a meager force and under UN oversight that he would later learn was determined to see him lose, General MacArthur assumed command of the U.S./Republic of Korea (ROK) troops, greatly outnumbered, with their backs to the sea at the southern tip of the Korean peninsula, they were facing annihilation.

            MacArthur attacked his enemy’s rear with an amphibious assault at Inchon, far up the Korean peninsula. With that one brilliant stroke, our forces severed the supply lines of the communist forces. In less than two months, the North Korean army had been defeated, driven not only out of South Korea but out of control of North Korea as well. The allied forces completely occupied North Korea, all the way up to the Manchurian border. The war had been won. Why MacArthur’s plans regarding the Inchon landing were not provided to Vasilev and his North Korean comrades remains a mystery. What is certain is that MacArthur, who did not have it within himself to refuse to follow military protocol, supplied his superiors with complete details of the invasion.

            After the war and during a Congressional investigation, General Mark Clark said: “I was not allowed to bomb the numerous bridges across the Yalu River over which the enemy constantly poured his trucks and his munitions, and his killers.” General James Van Fleet said: “My own conviction is that there must have been information to the enemy from high diplomatic authorities that we would not attack his home bases across the Yalu.” Air Force General George Stratemeyer added: “You get in war to win it. You do not get in war to stand still and lose it, and we were required to lose it. We were not permitted to win.” General MacArthur then summarized: “Such a limitation upon the utilization of available military force to repel an enemy attack has no precedent, either in our own history, or so far as I know, in the history of the world.”

            No one denied that General MacArthur had displayed unparalleled military competence. But, for the most part, the fact that he had defeated his adversary with a minimum loss of life and limb on both sides became lost in the adulation he received. General MacArthur was denied permission to destroy the bridges over the river which poured hordes of Chinese communist troops from Manchuria, and the war began again in earnest. Finding himself criminally restricted in the use of his military power by Washington. He objected, thereby giving Truman the excuse to remove him, not for disobeying orders, but for wanting to win. The Chicago Tribune stated at the time President Harry Truman wasn’t worthy to shine the general’s shoes.

            “Always in war when I visited my wounded in the hospital, I could look them in the eye, no matter what their condition or how tragic their wounds, knowing that our country had backed them to the hilt. But when I went to see my Korean wounded, I just couldn’t look them in the eye, knowing that they had been forced to fight with one hand tied behind their backs …. I am convinced I was restrained in Korea by some secret Administration policy directive or strategy about which I was not informed.” General Douglas MacArthur

            The General was correct: There was a secret arrangement about which he had never been informed. He was not alone in realizing the betrayal. Some of America’s leaders — in and out of uniform — have done their best to convert this proud profession into something unworthy of honor or praise.

            Command of the U.S./ROK forces was turned over to General Matthew Ridgway. He immediately altered the method of fighting. In his own book, The Korean War, Ridgway stated that his first task on assuming MacArthur’s command was “to place reasonable restrictions on the Eighth [U.S. Army] and ROK Armies’ advance.”

            The perverted rules of engagement Ridgway then instituted were responsible for many of the 50,000 American deaths. Then later another 58,000 Americans were killed in Vietnam, where our soldiers’ hands were again tied by similar, seemingly insane, restrictions. Secretary of State Mr. Dean Rusk and Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara are the despicable traitors who created these rules of engagement in Vietnam, and Lyman Lemnitzer, Maxwell Taylor, William Westmoreland, and Andrew Goodpaster (all CFR members) as the generals who accepted them. Traitorous!

            Ridgway’s orders to field commanders read in part: “You will direct the efforts of your forces toward inflicting maximum personnel casualties and material losses on hostile forces in Korea…Acquisition of terrain of itself is of little or no value.”

            It has been said: “Classic military strategy includes the taking and holding of terrain until so much of it has been acquired that the adversary is forced to sue for peace.” General Douglas MacArthur said: “In war, there is no substitute for victory.”

            But this was no longer allowable strategy in Korea. Even worse, our men were told that killing was to be their main goal.

            A morally sound military principle holds that removing an enemy’s capability to impose his will should be the goal — and killing him is not always necessary.

            Which is precisely what my favorite military hero, General Douglas MacArthur had demonstrated with the successful landing at Inchon.

            From the victory that had been gained after Inchon, our forces were required eventually to settle for a stalemate. A change, to abandon their traditional role as the finest moral traditions of the military, to become killers would be demanded even more in Vietnam.

            Two years of fighting was over relatively inconsequential hills (not to the troops) near the 38th parallel. Our troops would wage bitter hard-fought battles to take a particular hill, Then, after success had been achieved with plenty of casualties on both sides, orders from on high would require them to abandon what they had just won. Remember Ridgeway’s orders, “Acquisition of terrain of itself is of little or no value.” But, kill, kill, kill ! Traitorous!

            In Vietnam, We were repeatedly sent out on “search and destroy missions”; regularly pressed into fighting for a piece of terrain, won at great price, only to receive orders to abandon. The order of the day: Search and destroy.

            It was not the fault of the men in the field. The blame has to be placed at the feet of men such as President Truman, and General Ridgway, a political type whose eventual membership in the Council on Foreign Relations came as no surprise.

            Not nearly as obvious as in Korea where the display of the UN flag was prominent, the UN involvement in the Vietnam War was under authority stemming from our involvement in the UN’s South East Asia Treaty Organization (SEATO).

            On November 26, 1966 Secretary of State Dean Rusk stated, “It is this fundamental SEATO obligation that has from the outset guided our action in South Vietnam.” But earlier, on September 15, 1965, the State Department announced: “The Government of the United States has informed the UN Security Council promptly and fully of all our major activities in Vietnam.” Remember President Truman directing all orders to commanders in Korea be sent to the UN first. Traitorous.

            The communist forces knew what orders our troops were to follow all during the war! And they knew that, no matter what happened, the combined U.S. and South Korean Vietnam troops would not be allowed to triumph.

            The men in Vietnam were betrayed in other ways by their leaders. On July 23, 1966, during a speech at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, the home of one of the divisions in Vietnam, President Lyndon Johnson stated: “Our fighting men have turned the tide of battle [and as they] make a military conquest impossible for the communist forces in the field, our diplomats are probing for a way to make an honorable peace desirable to the communist leaders in Hanoi.”

            Can you believe it! Desirable to the communist leaders in Hanoi! Traitorous!

            Is that what Americans were dying for?

            The men in uniform who heard that statement must have known at that point that their comrades under arms in faraway Vietnam were not receiving the full backing of this nation’s leaders.

            Many who heard it, myself included, of course, would soon find themselves in South East Asia (SEATO). Not allowed to win.

            In the State of the Union address January 10, 1967, Mr. Johnson said there would be “more cost, more loss, more agony” in Vietnam. At the same time, he outlined a broad program of trade, credits, cultural exchanges, consular agreements, and other openings to the communist leaders in Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, and the Soviet Union. These were the nations that were supplying North Vietnam with the wherewithal to kill Americans. Traitorous!

            The Richmond (Virginia) News Leader declared in an editorial published on November 2, 1966: “Every communist bullet that tears into American flesh in Vietnam bears the brand of LBJ.”

            We were not being permitted to win. But none of us knew the rules of engagement under which they were forced to fight. In March 1985, after employing all the clout he could generate, Senator Barry Goldwater one of my favorite senators, was able to have the actual rules of engagement declassified by the Defense Department. He hurriedly placed them in the Congressional Record (March 6, 14, and 18, 1985).

            Here are some of the restrictions placed on U.S. pilots: (My Brother-in-law, USAF Col Ernest “Sonny” Hatchell F-4D Pilot included)
            • SAM missile sites could not be bombed while they were under construction, but only after they became operational.
            • Pilots were not permitted to attack a communist MiG sitting on the runway. The only time it could be attacked was after it was in the air, had been identified, and had shown hostile intentions.
            • Military truck depots located just over 200 yards from a road could not be attacked and trucks that drove off the road were safe from bombing.
            • If a South Vietnamese forward air controller was not in an aircraft, it was forbidden to bomb enemy troops during a fire fight even though the communist forces were clearly visible and were being pointed at by an officer on the ground.
            On the ground the rules (same in Korea) of engagement were: Don’t shoot until shot at; don’t chase the enemy across borders or into his privileged sanctuaries; don’t hit him where it will really hurt; and don’t win. There could hardly have been a greater betrayal of brave combat forces in all history. Traitorous!

            Top-ranking military leaders who spoke about the no-win policies forced on them during Korea began to find themselves forcibly retired. Douglas MacArthur was the first to go. During the war in Vietnam, more top-ranking military leaders who protested the restrictions placed on them were sent home. Marine General William Walt was expected by many military leaders to be named commandant of the Marine Corps. His outspokenness caused him to be passed over and retired.

            As the years have passed, political types in uniform have been promoted to the top positions in each branch of the services. Only a few years ago, the name of each member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff could be found on the rolls of the Council on Foreign Relations. Retired General Colin Powell is not the first Joints Chiefs chairman to hold membership in the CFR.

            Top brass who are purely military men have been removed and those who yield to political correctness is the reason why there are so little protest of America’s military being placed in humanitarian, nation-building, UN-promoting, and other missions which they should never have been involved.

            America’s Military personnel are still the best in the world. They exist to protect the vital interests of the United States and nothing more. They are not the Red Cross; they are not the UN’s globoalcops; they are not the Peace Corps; and they are not any President’s plaything to be used in whatever manner he wishes.

            Reclaiming the military’s sole mission of defending the United States is vitally important. Military personnel cannot do this of themselves. What they need, and what our nation needs, is a rising tide of public awareness about deep treachery at the top of our government.

            U.S. Army Major Fred A. Smith, a korean war POW, was told by the communist Chinese camp official that, “You are here to learn,” and “may take one year, ten years, or even 40 years, some of you may die here. But if you die, don’t worry. We will bury you deep so that you won’t stink.”

            Major Smith made it home, his testimony became part of the Congressional record. His words have been buried and forgotten, along with the accounts of his colleagues. The fates of his fellow prisoners of war have been sealed — not just by the communists deception, but also by our government.

            In 1953, retired Lieutenant General James A. Van Fleet, who had commanded the U.S. 8th Army in Korea (and whose son was among the POW/ MIAs), was quoted in the New York Times as saying that “a large percentage of the 8,000 American soldiers listed as missing in action are still alive.” Van Fleet was not alone in this assessment. General Mark Clark, former U.S. commander in Korea, resigned suddenly in 1953, and accused the communists of holding several thousand American servicemen after the prisoner switches was supposedly complete. General Mark Clark’s remarks did not spur action to bring our POWs home!

            Reports of Americans being held alive in North Korea from the days of the Korean War continue to surface. A report that appeared in the Bangkok-based Asia Times included an interview with a former Pyongyang secret police official, Oh Young Nam, whose father was reportedly a bodyguard to the late North Korean dictator Kim Il Sung. Oh Young Nam reported that between 1982 and 1993 he made numerous visits to a secret prison camp north of Pyongyang where elderly black and white men were housed, which was described to him by guards as a facility for U.S. prisoners from the Korean War. He said that one segregated sector was marked “USA” in Roman letters. Oh Young Nam recalled that once, during the early 1980s, he offered a beer to a black American at the camp.

            Washington has kept a tight lid on the story of abandoned POWs from the Korean and Vietnam Wars. Since Generals Van Fleet and Clark”s comments 50 years ago, nothing has changed for the better. Colonel Millard Peck, a Vietnam War hero who headed the Defense Intelligence Agency’s MIA/POW office, exposed the DIA’s “mindset to debunk” reports about living POWs in Southeast Asia. Resigning in disgust in 1991,

            “The Green Beret Colonel said that the POW effort “is being controlled and a cover-up may be in progress. The entire charade does not appear to be an honest effort, and may never have been…. that national leaders continue to address the prisoner of war and missing in action issue as the ‘highest national priority’ is a travesty.”

            The Clinton Administration gave diplomatic support, money and aid to Communist Vietnamese and the North Koreans — even though these communist regimes threaten our allies and our own troops on the Korean Peninsula and Taiwan.

            Former Congressman Robert “Bob” Dornan (R-CA), chairman of the House Subcommittee on Military Personnel declared, “This shameful institutional performance is best described as an unrelenting ‘predisposition to discredit and dismiss’ all information and reports that have merit and might lead to resolving cases of Americans known to have been alive in communist captivity and, frankly, may still be, in some seemingly God-forsaken cases.”

            Colonel Philip Corso a high-ranking, reliable soviet defector, and former top intelligence, a member of the Panmunjom truce delegation and on the National Security Council under President Eisenhower, testified of his own knowledge about how U.S. POWs were shipped from North Korea to Siberia, with their whereabouts purposely kept secret from the American public, provided details of the tortures of our prisoners at the direction of the Kremlin, including mind-altering procedures and terrible medical experiments similar to the Nazi and JAP’s during WWII. After this monstrous treatment, many of our men were executed, while others (from the Korean and Vietnam Wars) were subsequently transferred to the Soviet Union.

            Corroborating the testimony of Corso, who was personally involved with Eisenhower’s decision to hide from Americans U.S. knowledge of at least 900 Americans who were alive in enemy hands, are documents from the Eisenhower Library. Materials recently declassified at the request of the Dornan subcommittee indicate that in December 1953, four months after the August 1953 “Operation Big Switch” prisoner exchange, the Army was aware of the names of 610 persons who had “just disappeared from the camps.” Likewise, the Air Force knew of more than 300 unreturned men, leading to the belief that the Reds were holding U.S. military technicians.

            Corso pointed out that “in the past I have tried to tell Congress the fact that in 1953, 500 sick and wounded American prisoners were within ten miles of the prisoner exchange point at Panmunjom but were never exchanged.” In addition, Corso testified about reports from sources — including American POWs, intercepts from the National Security Agency, agents, defectors, Red Chinese and North Korean POWs, Nationalist Chinese, and others — that American POWs were sent to Siberia.
            “My intelligence,” said Corso, “centered around three train loads of 450 POWs each. Two of these trainloads were confirmed over and over, the third was not as certain. Therefore, the final figure was, ‘confirmed 900, and 1,200 possibly.’ These were the figures that I discovered with President Eisenhower while I was a member of his NSC.” Continued Corso: “The bulk of the sightings were at Manchu-li, on the border of Manchuria and the USSR. Here the rail gauge changed and the U.S. POWs had to be transferred across a platform to a waiting train going into the Soviet Union.”
            In short, Corso concluded, “the prisoners were sold down the river.” No doubt about that. Just as the former security official says, “We abandoned them.” Traitorous!

            The colonel was also assigned to the Operations Coordinating Board of the White House, National Security Council, where he handled virtually all projects on U.S. POWs. “Here I found that U.S. policy forbade that we win in Korea.” He even cited the specific directives for the “no win” policy, further elaborating that “we called this the ‘fig leaf policy.’”

            Testifying before the Dornan committee, former General Major Jan Sejna, member of the Czech Central Committee, the Parliament and Presidium, and the Party Group that gave orders to the latter two; whom many experts consider the most important communist official to seek asylum (1968). According to prominent defense analyst Dr. Joseph Douglass (who extensively debriefed Sejna and has worked with him on POW matters) and former DIA director Lieutenant General James A. Clapper Jr. has vouched for Sejna’s reliability.

            Seina testified that “we received directions from Moscow to build a military hospital in North Korea. The advertised purpose of the hospital was to treat military casualties. But this was only a cover, a deception. The top secret purl and biological warfare agents and to test the effects of atomic radiation, The Soviets also used the American GIs to test the physiological and psychological endurance of American soldiers. They were also used to test various mind-control drugs. Czechoslovakia also built a crematorium in North Korea to dispose of the bodies and parts after the experiments were concluded. Between 1961 and 1968, when I left Czechoslovakia, I would estimate at least 200 American POWs were shipped to the Soviet Union through Czechoslovakia.”

            Commander William “Chip” Beck stated that the testimony of General Sejna, “that transfers took place, not only in Korea, but [also in] Vietnam, has been supported in conversations with other reliable defectors.”

            These Soviet covert-operation secrets are being guarded even today by Russia, Vietnam, Laos, Red China, the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia, and even Cuba. Why? In a statement for the record, Beck gave the following:
            • First, because POW operations remain among the most sensitive of Soviet-orchestrated operations, perhaps even higher than their nuclear secrets.
            • Second, because “communism is not ‘dead.’ As its doctrine decrees, it is only underground. Of vital importance to the POW/MIA questions, there were no purges in the communist intelligence services in the former Soviet Union [FSU]. Documents and records, as General Sejna points out, were transferred from Eastern Europe to Moscow. Those who ran the KGB still run the SVR, and a dozen other services in Russia and the FSU.”
            • Third, it remains “difficult, but not impossible, for communist veterans who participated in these programs, and may know the fate of our POWs, to come forward. Their lives, families, and well-being are still at risk. As one former KGB officer told me, ‘journalists and businessmen are being killed in Moscow and St. Petersburg for trying to break secrets far less sensitive than the POWs.’”

            More galling, however, is that covering up these atrocities has long been a conscious act of the U.S. government. Even Senator John McCain (R-AZ), a former POW from the Vietnam War, continues (as he did during Senate hearings several years ago) to try to undermine revelations damaging to the Reds and to those protecting them. Why?

            British traitor George Blake, a POW 1950, was recruited to spy for the communists, then found guilty of being a Soviet agent in 1961. Former KGB London resident (head of station) Oleg Gordievsky noted in KGB: The Inside Story (HarperCollins, 1990) that the MGB, his agency’s progenitor, was “given unrestricted access to Western POWs held by the Chinese and North Koreans,” including Blake.

            Red Chinese mind-twisting, is described in Edward Hunter’s 1956 the Brainwashing.

            Moscow and Peking weren’t alone in the use of coercive human experimentation. The Nazis were infamous practitioners, as were the imperialist Japanese. Japan’s Army Unit 731 killed thousands of POWs, but most practitioners went unpunished so the Allies could share their knowledge of germ warfare. For more details — such as POWs being subjected to blood poisoning, lethal X-rays, electrocution, dehydration, boiling, freezing, enhanced air pressure until eyeballs burst, horse-blood transfusions, exposure to cholera, typhoid, anthrax, etc. — see, for instance, Gavan Daws’ Prisoners of the Japanese (Morrow, 1994).

            The first step in the misuse of our military was the passage of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) in 1949, sold by the Truman Administration under the phony cover of a mutual alliance to contain the communist menace. A creature of the In United Nations and subservient to it, NATO was set up as a path to regional merger, now being realized as NATO prepares to include Central and Eastern Europe and the former states of the Soviet Union as members. To begin the process, Truman was armed with an unprecedented and unconstitutional authority to dispatch troops to NATO.

            One year later Communist North Korea invaded the South and the UN Security Council called for members to intervene. What authority did Truman cite for his move? If he could send troops to NATO, he said, he could send them to Korea!

            Truman, was the first President to trash the US Constitution (only Congress can declare war) honoring the “superior” claims of the United Nations Security Council. He arrogantly called this first of America’s undeclared wars a “police action.” Traitorous!

            Abraham Lincoln said: Kings had always been involving and impoverishing their people in wars, pretending … that the good of the people was the object. This, our (Constitutional) Convention understood to be the most oppressive of all Kingly oppressions; and they resolved so to frame the Constitution that no one man should hold the power of bringing the oppression upon us.”

            Acting like kings, is exactly what Presidents Truman, Johnson, Nixon, Bush, Clinton and Bush have done through the backdoor route of the UN Charter, a document written and signed into being with the help of Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) Insiders for this very purpose. Congress let them do it acquiescing to illegal presidential military interventions in Korea, Vietnam, Panama, the Persian Gulf, Somalia, Haiti, and the Balkans. Our leaders including the US Senate and House of Representatives have transferred much of our nation’s jurisdiction in war to the United Nations, compromising our national sovereignty. Traitorous!

            Thanks for reading, Save Our Republic !

            Dan Richardson
            Greenwood, SC 29649

          • bob wire

            WoW! Dan Richardson , that was some posting! Thanks!

            So ~ you think you have a better view today?

            You know , The first liar hasn’t got a chance in hell.

            All of these men were honorable men, but men no less.

        • Hans Brakob MCPO, USN

          I was the Operations Chief at the Fleet Communications Center on Guam on the afternoon that the Pueblo was captured. I saw virtually every message to and from Pueblo, and between CINCPAC, 5th AF, and others concerned. Your jeremiad is flawed on several counts, and the bottom line is that Captain Bucher shamefully struck his colors without authorization.

          Hans Brakob, Master Chief Radioman, US Navy (Retired)

      • sylviam

        Right on all assesments of LBJ, only you left out the balls to stand tall for our people. LBJ was basking in the light of BEING PRESIDENT just like OBAMA is doing right now.
        Thats what his DIPLOMATIC and am using that word loosely on all the NUTLESS wonders out there, Yes thate is a time for diplomacy but that was not the case then as it is NOW. When war is delcared from either side, all cards are on the table but DIPLOMACY takes a back seat until all else is done. Now we face was in our on back yard & OBAMA will just apologizs again and again because he is NOT a PATRIOT in any shape or form. God Bless America

        • http://workingonthat.com Billy Jumper

          I hate to disillusion anyone, but Kennedy was the last patriot. Before that, it is necessary to go back to Harry Hopkins, then to Ferdinand Pecora. From there back to Lincoln then to Andrew Jackson, John Q. Adams, Monroe then to Madison then to Jefferson, Adams and Washington. Will there be a nest one? My opinion is no. Maybe Bernie Sanders or Elizabeth Warren or Naomi Wolf, but we know how that goes.

          • http://workingonthat.com Billy Jumper

            next one…

          • newspooner

            I hate to disillusion you, but Harry Hopkins was a Communist, Abraham Lincoln hired one of Karl Marx’s chief assistants to be one of his chief assistants, and John Kennedy was a fraud and plagarist. His most famous quote, “Ask not what your country can do for you…” was taken, without credit, from Khalil Gibran.

          • http://donthaveone Beberoni

            I will say this, that if Kennedy were alive today, he would not be a democrat, that is for sure. However, dont glorify him too much. The guy defiled the office of president over and over again, and when it came to running around with all these other women, he made Bill Clinton look like a choirboy. And your not much of a patriot to me, when you dont value the highest office in the country more than that. And there is also that connection to the mob he had. You know what Im saying. Patriots dont do that.

      • http://workingonthat.com Billy Jumper

        Bombing the North Koreans may have been fun, but nothing was done about the Pueblo because of people like Jonathan Pollard. The Ashkenazim saw the U.S. Pueblo as an intelligence vessel spying on them. They planned the attack. That is why the planes had no markings and there were no communications or warnings. We spy on the Ashkenazim and they on us continuously.

        • http://donthaveone Beberoni

          They also knew a democrat was president, and wasnt going to do anything. Just like with Clinton, when they continually bombed us and killed our soldiers, he did nothing.

      • Dogma-Free Too

        Wayne, since WWII, when has there NOT been a pathetic time in American history?

        Also, it’s nice to see how things come full-circle, isn’t it?

        Before, other countries were the ones who would torture our guys…but now, we torture people from other countries (even if it’s illegal)…though, I guess we get around legalities by calling it ‘enhanced interrogation’ now.

        • LeRoy Z.

          Dogma-Free Too, your comment really troubles me. You want me to call what our prisoners go through torture. I’m sorry, but after having seen pics and film from WWII and the holocaust, the POW camps in Vietnam, etc. and being unable to get the picture and sound of the people jumping from the World Trade Center out of my mind, I just can’t feel awfully sorry for our prisoners. They are not starved. They are not beaten, crippled. I’ve never heard of one of them being beheaded. Are they mistreated??? Of course!!! Their holy books are disrespected, their religion comes under fire, oh my gosh the list just goes on and on…Anyway, you get my point. The sight of people who have truly been tortured the way other cultures do it simply horrifies me. And I’ll NEVER forget those people jumping from the twin towers!!! I can’t imagine that. And yes, I know two wrongs don’t make a right. But others don’t always follow those who take the high road, they simply see that as a weakness and exploit it to their advantage.

      • EddieW

        Bowing Obaba would most likely bow to any demands N Korea made, and allow them to keep and kill our soldiers or naval personell…But he would tell us on TV that he raked the N Koreans over the coals!!! the Liar in Chief would do his lying thing!! It’s all he knows!!

    • wandamurline

      I was a young woman when Johnson (traitor) was president. Not only was he a coward, he was a corrupt elists who knowingly allowed the Viet Nam war to continue as nothing more than a killing of our soldiers. You would need to know that he is the one that decided that our soldiers could no longer bomb North Vietnam…when he issued that order, the war was completely lost. Years later, the North Vietnamese stated that they would have surrendered if we had continued to bomb their cities. So, this incident does not surprise me one bit. Johnson and his cronnies became filthier rich (he was already rich) off the deaths of our soldiers in the killing fields of Nam. He was someone who should have been on trial for treason against his own country…may he stay in hell forever.

      • http://workingonthat.com Billy Jumper

        Wanda, you are correct, sadly. Lyndon smiled over his shoulder at his cronies on Air Force One while standing next to Jackie Kennedy covered with the blood of her husband and shell shocked. His quote upon arriving at the White House was, “I’ll give them their war.” He was a hireling as many of our presidents are today. If you want to blame someone, blame the bankers. They finance both sides of all wars, then they collect interest on their loans.

        • http://deleted Claire

          Wanda & Billy Jumper–I agree with both comments. It was a horrific day when JFK was killed. The whole world was shocked. And Jacquie–she did have her husband’s blood all over her. She showed a lot of strength. Of all the presidents we have had, I have to say JFK was my favorite. Whether I am right or wrong, I liked him. Oswald was just a stoolie that carried out the evil deed. Who really was behind JFK’s assassination?

          • Dan az
          • http://deleted Claire

            Dan az–I pulled up your site, and egads, some of the theories are mindboggling. I went through quite a few, and I am going to go back and finish looking at the resst of them. I will let you know what I think.

          • libertytrain

            I’m not comfortable with the “Oswald done it theory” but this video is not particularly reliable if one watches some of the other videos posted on the page -

          • http://deleted Claire

            libertytrain: I know, some of them were absolutely cartoonish.

        • http://donthaveone Beberoni

          Lyndon Johnson was an arrogant s.o.b., with a penchant for money, and he made millions for him and his cronies escalating the Vietnam war, with no intentions of winning it, just making money while our young boys died for his political gain. It may have gone different if Kennedy had stayed alive, I truly want to believe that. But Johnson was a cold and calculating man, and was driven by money, and money alone. And as it is written, man cannot serve both God and money. So we all know who Johnson served now dont we?

      • http://Illinois'17th Old Henry

        Wanda:

        Wow. I don’t know where to begin. That was wonderfully said, and said exactly what I have thought and felt for 40 + years.

        Oh, by the way, he will be in hell forever.

    • http://Illinois'17th Old Henry

      Little Barry’s immediate response would be to instantly apologize over and over while furiously bowing and cow-towing.

      1968: A stinking Socialist womanising Democrap was president. LBJ was as bad as JFK.
      1999: A stinking Socialist womanising Democrap was president.

      The more things change, the more they stay the same….

      (I wonder if LBJ would pick Little Barry up by his ears?)

      • http://workingonthat.com Billy Jumper

        Why was Kennedy assassinated? All of these years, we have been regaled by tales of who, where, how, what, etc. Qui bono?

        • http://Illinois'17th Old Henry

          Bill Jumper:

          I know a lawyer who was in his 20s when JFK was shot and he was a huge fan of JFK and has been quite involved in the history of the shooting. He swears that Sam Gioncona had Kennedy shot because JFK appointed RFL as Attorney General and then sent him after the mob. Taht was after the mob was instrumental in getting JFK elected in 60 with their meferious voting “activities”.

          Oswald was simply a pawn. No one seems to question why they locked up all the evidence for, what was it, 75 years?

          Like Barry’s information, if there is nothing to hide, you do not hide it.

        • http://donthaveone Beberoni

          He was killed by the fed, as he was about to get rid of them, and they struck first. No doubt about it. Read up on the fed, on who they are, what they do, and why they killed Kennedy. It all makes perfect sense.

      • http://workingonthat.com Billy Jumper

        It turns out that Republican Socialism is actually the best form of government.

        • http://donthaveone Beberoni

          Sorry dude, but get with reality. The democrats, under Obama’s leadership, are the most socialist state weve ever had, and if they had their way, we would bow down to socialism and collapse. You cannot deny that, or you sir, are a liar.

    • http://workingonthat.com Billy Jumper

      This whole sordid episode was perpetrated by our so-called friends, the Ashkenazim. They continue to make the world a very dangerous place. They have subjugated the Palestinians and the Israelis since 1948. Some of us still remember.

    • czechstan

      What you expect from liberals and democrats ? 1999 was presidente senior Bush,not much better , he could capture or sink the boat,unstead he was trying sell us to mexicans with Mccain and late onkel Kennedy.

      • http://donthaveone Beberoni

        No, it was Clinton who sold our jobs to Mexico. Get it straight. And our technology to China.

  • NDak Dave

    Thanks for the history lesson. It’s a lesson I’ve never heard in my 48 years and I’m disappointed it took this long to learn about it. I will never forget the Pueblo and will endeavor to learn more about this rotten treatment of brave US sailors. Thanks again for shinning a light on this shadowy and sad history.

    • scottb

      You didn’t hear about the Pueblo because L Johnson tried to keep it quite. I was in the service from 1952 until 1972, and during those years following the Korean war, a lot of things happen that no one heard of. Like some patrol planes lost that no ever heard of their disappearance and their crews never found. I was there.

      • NDakDave

        You should write about those stories and make them public.

      • chick

        you are right… I was in from 62 to 66, and seen all kind’s for stupid thing’s happen that our goverment kept out of the new’s.. just like they are doing now.. surprise….

      • http://Illinois'17th Old Henry

        ScottB:

        Thank you for serving and keeping us safe. May God keep you safe.

  • Charles

    Thanks for reminding us. G_d forbid that it will happen again.

    • always right

      It did happen again. Read about the USS Scorpion and the USS Thresher

      • independant thinker

        Get the book “Scorpion Down” by Ed Offley. It gives a very good account of the Scorpion incident.

        As far as I can determine from my reading the Thresher incident was a mechanical failure.

      • sylviam

        Also do not forget the USS COLE that OBAMAS budy ahaminejad ( forgive the misspelled) President of IRAN, should have been taken into custody as soon as his feet hit the soil we call AMERICA, and fased murder charges by a MILITARY TRIBUNAl. But also not much happened after the “Black Hawk” down incedent either all because of BILL CLINTON. He and Hilary detested the MILITARY and anything connected to it but during his 8-yr. stint as President they used the military as their SERVANTS. The dems are about nothing good for our troops at all and begrudge them a pay check and Va. benefits just like they detest the poor people. As far as the can see there is only 2-classes of citizens~~~~~Middle class and Upper class~~~~~~poor peole do not even live as far as they can see. Our MILITARY is our defence and our HEROS but no one can make the liberals see that all they want to see is THIER NUTLESS WONDERS IN OFFICE. GOD BLESS AMERICA

        • http://Illinois'17th Old Henry

          Sylviam:

          U.S.S. Cole: Good ole d*ck-for-brains war protester did absolutely nothing to hunt down the perpetrators. That helped embolden the Isamic scum.

          I think Democraps like poor people – they make so many of them, and then work to keep them on the Democrap plantation.

        • http://workingonthat.com Billy Jumper

          Don’t let your politics get in the way of those stubborn things called facts. The blame game is for kids.

        • http://donthaveone Beberoni

          Your correct. They did these dastardly deeds and killed a lot of American soldiers, and Clinton did absolutely nothing. And dont forget, they also blew up the basement of the World Trade Centers the first time, and again, Clinton did nothing. And while this was going on, he continued to gut our intelligence agency and military cutting them in half, leaving us vulnerable. Do you know how much money Bush had to spend to get our intelligence and military back to snuff? No wonder his figures show he spent so much. That is one large chunk of change.

  • Mary Matthews

    This is a chilling story and I had never heard it. Thank you so much for revealing what I’m guessing most Americans do not know. It is a shameful chapter in our history and it needs to be remembered. God bless the sailors of the Pueblo.

  • Barbara

    I remember the Pueblo incident. This article however, fills in information either not known or forgotten.
    LBJ sacrificed our troops. He made sure the military were afraid to act appropriately.
    He did the same as FDR when thousands of our troops and civilians were taken to Russia for slave labor after WWII.

  • http://google.com mathilda

    Yep, me also, I love history, and I know we don’t take care of our patriotic solders that fight for us everyday,shame on our goverment for not standing up for our men and women in uniform.
    We need to keep the feet to the fire also on our goverment, and make them liable for our solders and prisoners of war over there, we need to get aggresive on getting them back. This is bull, if we are at war then we need to go over there and say either you give them back or we will take you out.
    We were once a great nation, what happened to us? We had the greatest military in the world and now we are getting rated as no2? We the people need to stand up to the goverment and tell them this ain’t going to happen. We need to get our forces together and get our military back to the way we had it when Reagan had it.
    Nobody messed with us then.
    Sad to see the people changing to woosies.

    • wayne

      I agree, mathilda. President Reagan was a man of principles. He was a fair man, but he would not put up with any foolishment like the Democrats have in the past. The world leaders respected Reagan and that is why the Iranians releaed the hostages as soon as, or within that time frame, he took office. We need more Ronald Reagans.

      • belloni890

        Which reagan are you talking about?The one that was president SOLD weapons to IRAN to get the hostages released.And not to bust anyones bubble of him it was not his BOO game that got them released they feared reagan no more than Carter or anyone of the other puppets in the white house.

        • Vicki

          Since THE hostages being discussed were taken in 1979 and released almost as soon as Reagan’s inauguration and that the selling of arms for hostages (Iran-Contra) did not occur until 1985 I find your assertion to be false.
          http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h2021.html

          The assertion that the Iran Hostage Crisis hostages were released because Iran was (rightfully) afraid of Reagan stands.

      • http://workingonthat.com Billy Jumper

        Whoops. Do you really know who bribed the Iranians with what? Reagan had Alzheimer’s. Doesn’t anybody listen remember Iran/Contra? Who did Reagan work for for over thirty years? Why is GE such a huge government contractor in everything from engines to avionics? Come on people.

        • Vicki

          “Did Reagan have Alzheimer’s disease in office? Yes and no. Without a doubt, he was on his way to getting the disease, which develops over many years. But it is equally clear that there was not yet nearly enough decline in function to support even a tentative diagnosis. Reagan’s mind was well within the realm of normal functioning. Even if his doctors had been looking intently for Alzheimer’s, it is still likely that they would not have been able to detect the disease-in-progress. A slight deterioration of memory is so common among the elderly that even today it is considered to be a natural (if unwelcome) consequence of aging. About a third to a half of all human beings experience some mild decline in memory as they get older, taking longer to learn directions, for example, or having some difficulty recalling names or numbers.”

          http://www.beliefnet.com/Health/2004/06/Does-He-Remember-Being-President.aspx

          Poor and invalid ad hominem attack against President Reagan.

          • http://deleted Claire

            Vicki: And now Reagan’s sons are fighting amongst themselves over this issue. This info popped up on the Internet a day or so ago, but I did not read the entire story.

          • libertytrain

            Claire – I just looked it up, read about it, watched the video, and pretty much understand why there is a disagreement.

        • http://donthaveone Beberoni

          No. He was fully alert when he left office sir. And he saved your bacon. I would believe if they pulled this under him, that shipped would have been blown up.

    • wayne

      matilda, the folks are voting in the wrong people as our leaders, as well as in Congress. We, he people, need to hold our leaders more responsible, but we don’t. Another thing is we need term limits in Congress. People going there and staying there for 30 to 50 years are not doing us any favors. It was not meant to go to Congress and make a career out of it. There again, lets blame the people for this.

      • Vicki

        We HAVE term limits. All we have to do is VOTE.

        • http://deleted Claire

          Vicki–Yes, we have term limits but the sad fact is that we have to “endure” these politicians until such time we can vote them out of office. They can do a lot of damage in one year, let alone four.

          • Vicki

            Which is why we have to teach our children well. Oh and our friends too. :) Vote Libertarian http://www.lp.org . Its the only way to be sure.(Till they get too much power ;) )

          • http://deleted Claire

            Vicki: Libertarian sounds good to me. I am still trying to find a true Conservative, but the ones I like cannot afford to run, plus the fact they do not receive the media attention that the so-called popular candidates get. Many good candidates have fallen by the wayside because of biased media.
            Oh, I hear Olbermann is out at MSNBC.

          • Vicki

            Claire says
            “plus the fact they do not receive the media attention that the so-called popular candidates get. Many good candidates have fallen by the wayside because of biased media”

            But we have an alternative that can break the MSM. Social Networking. I.E. Twitter, Facebook etc. Candidates can create their stories there and using viral advertising spread the word right around over and under MSM. MSM will become totally irrelevant.

          • http://donthaveone Beberoni

            They booted Olberman? Maybe there is some hope for MSNBC after all. If they would dump the lying liberal agenda, and go for the truth, Im thinking their ratings would skyrocket. No doubt about it.

    • TF

      What happened to us is that we have allowed politicians too much input into how we conduct war. If you remember at the time most politicians used their influence to make sure that their children never saw any combat (remember the draft). We now have cowardly politicians that think that fighting a war is ok as long as no one dies. I remember the Pueblo as I was on on a ship around Vietnam at the time and I can remember how betrayed I felt to be risking my life for a bunch of politicians that were too cowardly to give an order that could have saved hundreds of lives. I love my country but my opinion is that most politicians if held up to public scrutiny would be lined up before a firing squad and shot for treason.

    • Richard Pawley

      You ask, “We were once a great nation, what happened to us? We had the greatest military in the world…” It all depends on whether you want the truth or the politically correct answer. We still have the greatest military in the world but those who put their life on the line for cutting edge intelligence are seldom supported sufficiently. There are those who believe that if Clinton hadn’t gutted our intelligence agencies we would have known enough to take seriously the threats and warnings of what became known as 9/11. At an even deeper level (that many don’t know of or don’t even realize) is that we once gave our creator His due and we don’t do that (as a nation) anymore. We once acknowledged that we were, “one nation under God”. Today we only want to be god, to be our own gods or live as gods. I was not totally surprised at what Johnson did while president and stories abound about other things less known than this. I mention one even more shocking than this in my autobiography and I also recall one of the Colonel’s in the Pentagon who openly worshipped Satan in times past (and under the Constitution he was free to do that but it shows how fear has permeated some parts of the Pentagon, then and now). Jesus once said that “Fear is an enemy of man” and one of our greatest generals, an unconventional believer, once said, “I never give counsel to my fears” (George C. Patton). Even today (well, last year actually) the Pentagon refused to allow Rev. Franklin Graham to pray at the national day of pray event. Then we were fearful of Soviet Russia, today we are fearful of offending those who have killed far more Americans than the Soviet Russians ever did, the militant Islamists. As Graham said, “Even in our government today, you can’t pray to Jesus in many public meetings. You can pray to God or a god. You can mention Buddha or the name of Muhammad — but you can’t pray to Jesus Christ,”. I found it interesting that at the Tucson Tragedy, the prayers were mostly to “Father Sky and Mother Earth”. At least Obama made a reference to Job in the Old Testament.
      Many may scoff at my comparisons but the Soviets never had schools all over the United States devoted to teaching their adherents things like Sharia Law, and the inferiority of women, or that some imaginary god will give a great reward if they kill, murder and maim in his name. The truth is that one of the many laws of the Universe is the Law of Reciprocity (what you sow you will reap). You don’t have to believe this any more than you have to believe in the Law of Gravity. Both will work without your knowledge if you are ignorant of them. Better to co-operate with them and not walk off a cliff or create unintended consequences for yourself by your actions or your thoughts. Jesus, who some will NOT see, apparently, when they die ( http://www.near-death.com/ritch.html ) said not to even think evil of your enemies, as you are only harming yourself. He never said that you might not have to defend yourself and your family if they are trying to kill you. Atheism is no match for militant Islam and only the fervent prayer of those who follow Jesus or who worship the God of the Bible, the creator of all that is, can prevent our demise as a nation. Sadly, the eventual destruction of our dollar and eventually our economy seems to be necessary to get us back on the right track of what really counts and what doesn’t. What we need is a national revival as in times past with outstanding miracles of the blind seeing and the lame walking to get enough people coming to God and praying for our nation. Remember, the Soviets never had schools all over the country preparing an army for who knows what. Militant Islam already considers Europe as theirs and it is one of the fastest growing “religions” here (with thousands of new converts each year in our prisons). There are powerful groups in this country who are working towards the goal of one world everything, some in the name of a religion, and some in the name of a new universal money system. It appears that the media and the Pentagon are as fearful of the former as they were of the old Soviet Union. (I would point out that Job who the president paraphrased in his speech once said, “The things that I have feared have come upon me”). We tend to attract that which we fear. There are many sources of information on what is happening in Europe, the world and in the USA today, books and videos. Here is just a sample of one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FEmzvAVacLU. May God bless all who read this.

      • http://workingonthat.com Billy Jumper

        Members of the Hasty Pudding Club and Skull and Bones worship Satan too.

      • Dan az

        Hey Richard
        Death is nothing more than a doorway, something you walk through.” – Dr. George Ritchie
        Each of us will experience the light in this lifetime and what we do with it will be our judgment to the next.I pity those that have not experienced it yet but know they will in time.

  • Uncle Pat

    I remember the Pueblo very well. As a 20 year old US Air Force Airman I was travelling to my next duty assignment. At the St. Louis Airport an announcement was made. “ALL Military travelling home on leave RETURN immediately to your Military Base. ALL travelling to assignments continue to your assigned Base”. I witnessed many military in the arms of their wives or sweethearts,have their smiles turn to sadness as they had to turn around and go back from where they came. I continued on to my assignment in Alaska. But,I was retained , as were hundreds of others,at an Air Force Base in Washington for 5 days until we knew whether we would be going to Korea. We were very surprised that NO action was taken and allowed to continue on to our new duty assignments. I will NEVER forget the Pueblo, or the men who served valiantly for our country.

    • chick

      Just like today’s goverment.. my brother and three of his team died from the agent orange,but the goverment won’t fess up.. the 82nd first special forces,have plent of men that have died form this,and our gourvement still refuses to admit blame… surprise..buy the way,, these men served 3 tour’s in viet nam

  • Tom Bird

    There is another untold element of this intrigue. The Pueblo was monitoring N.Korean jets, some 400 of them, probably including some Soviet planes, which were flying sorties and challenging the S. Korean forces along the DMV. The apparent motive was to test our responses, with the thought of invading S. Korea while we were preoccupied with the war in Vietnam. Our official response was that we had no planes within range of defending the Pueblo. In fact, there were at least a dozen planes on the “ready pad” in S. Korean bases and Japan that could have assisted. The F-4 planes in SE Asia theatre could have been there (flying at over twice the speed of sound) within the time it took to move the ship within the 12 mi limit. WE WERE AFRAID of losing our planes to the overwhelming enemy forces, so we abandoned the crew and ship. Within 72 hours we had moved 400 planes from various bases around the world to S. Korean bases and were flying missions head-to-head along the DMV, armed with nuclear weapons. I was one of the thousands of Airmen shipped as part of a tactical response team to support this effort. Once we faced them down, we were left there in Korea until the summer, because the military budget didn’t allow for the costs to send us back stateside until the next fiscal year. A fiasco for all involved, most especially for the brave captain and crew of the Pueblo. PS- we were awarded “battle ribbons” they were BLAMED AND IGNORED by the military and press.

    • Mike In MI

      Tom -
      You mentioned, “military budget” above.
      The way the present administration is going after things and the way we are coming up flat broke on fiscal matters I’m concerned for our forces overseas; I think we should abandon our extracurricular excursions abroad and bring our kids home – force the government to bring them home. They want to cut the military budget to the bone. What if there isn’t enough later to afford to move them – like your experience? What is Obumbler going to do, give them a deflated inner tube and tell them, “You’re on your own. Fend for yourselves.”? That’s about how much respect he has for our soldiers. Besides, then he doesn’t have to put them on his “unemployed roster” when they arrive back.
      Maybe that’s why he abandoned his anti-war stance – despite its making the left furious at him. I think he’d be just as happy to leave them for his brothers under the crescent moon for their playthings.
      Bring them home…now!!!

      • http://workingonthat.com Billy Jumper

        Mike, you have it. This empire is in dire trouble. The troops need to come home now. If not, they will be left to survive on their own exactly the way the Roman soldiers were after the fall.

        • Marten

          Yup…That’s what Dr Ron Paul said for, how many years???????

  • http://jenersea@comcast.net jenersea

    The saddest part of the whole thing is that we did not go and get the Pueblo back when they were towing it. We got our ships back when the Barbary Pirates had them. Decauter set them on fire to keep the Muslims from having them. Of course in that time in 1968, these ships were out there operating on their own. If something happened, you got out of it the best way you could, as you see, you were not to expect any help. Same thing as when the Liberty got attacked in the Med during the 6 days war. Our subs were operating in Russian harbors, and probably so were theirs. Bears flew off the East Coast on the way to Cuba on a routine basis. Russian and American ships were running into each other lots of times. Especially when we would venture into the Black Sea. I am sure most of the country does not remember or ever heard of these things. It was always rumored that the USS Scorpion was sunk by the Russians on its way back from a secret mission. Our ships used to sneak into Russian waters to see how far we could actually get before being spotted. All part of WW 3 the Cold War. Some day we will hear about all the things that are going on now in WW 4.

    • independant thinker

      As I mentioned above get the book “Scorpion Down” by Ed Offley for information on the Scorpion incident.

      Very briefly the Scorpion was returning from war games in the Med. and was diverted on a spy mission. At the end or just after the completion of that mission the Scorpion was sunk by a torpedo. Some claim it was sunk by a torpedo fired by a soviet sub and some say it was sunk by one of its own torpedos that was ditched because of problems and the torpedo went active looped and hit the Scorpion. read the book and draw your own conclusions.

      • Phil

        The correct name of the book on the USS Scorpion is “All Hands Down”

  • Dan az

    Im glad that this was brought out of the dark past to show everyone that torture does exist in other countries and to be politically correct about being the only country that lives with the geneva convention while being brutally tortured we then accuse the very ones that follow orders to protect the politicians azzes for trying to play soldier.At that same time in history we where being tortured in vietnam and had to put up with hanoey jane showing the world how bad we are,Amazingly disgusting.Then to return home just to be spit on by the liberal crowd.They wounder why we have an attitude,and now labeled a threat to the very country that sent us there.Sorry Im rambling again.

    • wayne

      Why in the world wasn’t this woman charged, and put in prison. This had to have come from the top echlon not to charge her. I hope some one else understands this, I certainly do not.

      • wayne

        To think a lot of Americans supported this Hanoie Jane by going the movies she starred in. I made a vowel I ould never go to a movie with this creep in it.

        • Vigilant

          I have not paid to watch a Jane Fonda movie since that time.

          • sylviam

            hANOI JANE had a good Partner in that his name is JOHN KERRY—to become a SENATOR then RAN FOR PRESIDENT, he also should haVe been tried for treason BECAUSE HE WAS STILL IN THE MILITARY WHEN HE SPOUTED HIS FILTH AND HATE. That is what I find disgusting.
            I HEARD HIS TRASHY MOUTH SAYING ALL THE THINGS ABOUT his so called BROTHERS IN ARMS in WASHINGTON DC. at one of her ralleys. That told me a lot about the DEMS that far back in time surely America did not forget his sitting in front of a CONGRESSIONAL HEARING and saying the same thing. HOW DARE THEM to take in their LOVING ARMS and WELCOME him into their party than BACK him. HE SHOULD NEVER BE ABLE TO HOLD A PUBLIC OFFICE BECAUSE OF TREASONOUS ACTIONS AND WORDS.
            GOD BLESS AMERICA

    • Richard Pawley

      Dan, Just a note to tell you that I am grateful for your service to our nation in Vietnam. There is little more I can say, but do yourself a treat and pick up a copy of PRISON TO PRAISE (it’s only a 106 pages long and has changed the life of millions) and since a good section of it is about some who were in Vietnam, including the author, I think you might get something out of it. I knew one of the people in the book and although it’s not for everyone I have a hunch you will find more in it than some (and it’s a heck of a true story too). Wishing you the very best and in the words of George S. Patton Jr. remember, “If everybody is thinking alike, then somebody isn’t thinking.”

      • Dan az

        Thanks Richard I’ll do that!

    • http://workingonthat.com Billy Jumper

      Sorry, you’re about eight years too late on the Geneva Convention. Bush and Cheney renounced that at about the same time that they said that habeas corpus no longer applies. What does that mean. It means that people who are arrested may be held forever.

  • DROB1776

    Thanks for the reminder as I realize I had not thought about the Pueblo in some time. I was a junior in college at the time it was taken. My family lived in Brementon, WA where the Pueblo was outfitted for its intelligence gathering duties at Bremerton Navel Shipyard. Being from a Navy family I actualy met Cammander Bucher breifly at a party some friends of my parents were having while he was in Bremerton awaiting the outfitting of his command. I can remenber the shock I felt at the time as I kept thinking surely we will take action and the dissmay at our not doing so. I also remember seeing the photos of the crew you spoke about and yes they were sending us messages that they were not caving in God Bless them. Thank you for refreshing out menories of this episode in our history.

  • Ron

    If the US Government had the guts to stand up to the Israelis when the USS Liberty was attacked and which by the way killed 34 fine American Navy,Marine, and civilian personnel then the Pueblo probably would never have happened. To let the IDF get away with this murderous attack is one of the lowest points in this country’s history. Dean Rusk said in his book “As I Saw It” that he never believed the Israeli excuse. Neither do I. I am a survivor and I saw their efforts to put us to the bottom, and they KNEW who we were.

    • Richard Pawley

      Haven’t read Rusk’s book but you have to remember that Israel is a country much like ours. They vote, they elect their leaders. They have the Bible for guidance and they have liberals and conservatives, believers and atheists. I agree with you that the evidence is pretty sound that those who sank our spy ship knew what they were doing, but that wasn’t the whole county, any more than Hollywood, Jane Fonda, and John Kerry represented our country then either. Unfortunately they have rogue elements in their government and military just like we do, but the sinking of the USS LIBERTY was just as much President Johnson’s doing than those who did the sinking. Our jets could have been there in minutes if Johnson had been willing to give the order. He was just another non-military professional politician. It was the USS Liberty sinking that I referred to in my earlier mention of my autobiography, LEAVING SOUTH CAROLINA, above, and according to the Law of Reciprocity (a universal principal) that I also mentioned, Israeli has paid for that by attacks on her own by others that have killed just as many. In the words of the poet, “There is a destiny that makes us brothers, none goes his way alone, all that we send into the lives of others, comes back into our own”. (Edwin Markham I think). This holds true for countries as much as it does for individuals. Many do not believe this but that is irrelevant. They will see it all play out eventually. Jesus said that not a sparrow falls from the sky that God is not aware of. May God bless and heal you. I’m glad you survived.

      • http://workingonthat.com Billy Jumper

        Israel is nothing like here. Ask the Israelis, not the Ashkenazim.

  • john

    How quickly we forget. I wonder if anyone remenbers this?

    I was in the U. S. Navy from September 1968 and off the coast of Viet Nam in the summer of 1969 when the N Koreans captured a second U. S. survey vessel. Unlike LBJ, Nixon ordered an entire Carrier fleet immediately to Korea. Not too surprisingly, the vessel was released before we even got there. Teddy was right about the effectiveness of carrying a big stick.

  • http://aol Mike

    How timely that this sordid story of cowardice and betrayal by the highest levels of our government and military heirarchy should appear today. I remember the wave of nausea and disgust that overwhelmed me when it happened. Many more similar events would follow in the ensuing years, not the least of which was the persecution of the the skipper and crew of the Pueblo when they were released.

    Today the South Korean Special Forces demonstrated how piracy should be “handled”. How refreshing by contrast!

  • Andrew

    I remember the Pueblo event. All I read about it was, that the it happened so fast we were unable to protect our ship. All our resourses were too far away to provide potection in time to prevent nk from caputuring our ship. That content is all that was in all the newspapers. After the capture, nothing was done by our govt. I was in the US Army at the time, I couldn’t understand how we could let a ship patrol in dangerous waters off the nk coast without any backup.
    I never read or heard the description of the entire ordeal of the Pubelo before. This was the same profile that johnson had fighting the vietnam war. We were still, and still are, at war with nk. This was a big disgrace to our country, we should have turned nk into a glass parking lot.

    • Vigilant

      I recall a movie made about it, with Hal Holbrook playing Bucher. The riveting part of the movie was when Bucher looked at his captors and said, ” I will NOT sign your G-d Damned confession!”

  • Phil

    I remember the “Pueblo”. I also remember the “Liberty”. Amazing how many American lives will be sacrificed to be politically correct.

    • wayne

      I also remember this incident. However, my tour of US Air force duty ended in 1960. I served 4 years. Yes, yes, and yes, why is this not i the history books. Is it because it would made the Democrats looks like what thee really are, cowards?

  • Tom SC

    Sadly I do remember the Pueblo. I remember at the time I couldn’t believe this country took no action to save the ship especially since we had military forces in S Korea and several other locations in the Far East. Everybody was afraid of the Soviets backing N Korea. The major problem we had then was our mealy mouthed diplomatic corp. and it remains the same today.I also remember in 1968 Johnson was having a problem committing troops to Vietnam,again the diplomats and we had been in volved with armed conflict with Korea just 13 years prior and we were’nt even allowed to call it a war because it was diplomatically convenient to the UN who was running the so called conflict.While they were running their diarea of the mouth in Korea, our soldiers were dieing there.That WAR has never been ended officialy there only exists a cease fire agreement that could explode at anytime.

    • wayne

      Tom, this is why we need to maintain a very large and capable military in the presence of all the threats we have today. I remember President Clinton closing a lot of our military bases, and discharging military membes doing his presidency. Now Obummber has been talking aboug doing it too. What is wrong with the air heads. Why do we need a slick talking cowards like these two men. I’ll have to hand it to President Reagan, he built up the military. He certainly did not tear it down. Wake up America, and see what’s happening to our once great nation. We need to be ready to defend this country under any circumstance.

      • http://workingonthat.com Billy Jumper

        How is it possible to defend when you are not aware of who is the enemy?

        • http://donthaveone Beberoni

          You dont know who the enemy is? Really. See the guy with the towel wrapped around his head? If you dont think like he believes you should think, your an infidel, and deserve death. That sir, is the enemy.

    • Pat R

      Thanks for the History lesson today, Chip. I have to admit that I had never heard of most of this before.

      All of you Veterans need to check out the Republic of the united States of America. IMHO, this is the last chance to save America. The “Republic” is in operation now. We have been recognized and supported by many Nations who know that if America falls, so will the rest of the World. Maybe you would be interested in being a “Ranger”; our Law Enforcement. People, this is the time to take a stand for Freedom and provide a future for our kids and grandkids.
      We have a deJure Grand Jury being held in Georgia this weekend. Things are happening to get rid of the planes spraying chemicals in the sky that is destroying everything.

      I don’t understand why Bob or Chip are not writing about the re-inhabited Republic of the united States of America. They seem to want to compremize on the info that we need to know.

      Go the website, read the History there and prepare for the shock of your life! Yes, they have really done all of this to “We the People” since 1871.

      http://www.republicfortheunitedstates.org

  • Baba

    My AF missile husband was deployed from Okinawa to Korea, about the time my four children and I were supposed to join my husband on Okinawa. I remember the Pueblo Incident very well. What the non-military public doesn’t know about that “incident” is remarkable. The major decision to “lie” saved many lives. Lest we forget the Vietnam war was in progress at the same time. It amazed me that the politicians sitting in the United States were commenting and being analytical about the incident…”The Commander should have done this – The Commander should have done that…” Easy to be an arm chair war professional but had they been in the same situation, they would have peed their pants instead of making a call on what was done.

  • Harold Olsen

    The one thing I remember most about the Pueblo incident was Lyndon Johnson’s speech after the ship was captured. He looked as though he were about to start crying and he reminded me of a little child who had had his favorite toy taken away from him by some bully. He was pathetic.

    • Baba

      Play acting. Johnson was one disgusting President.

  • meteorlady

    Thanks for the history. I had forgotten about this incident. Can’t believe in 1999 we didn’t take the ship back if it’s still a commissioned US ship. Things like this make me wonder how the military actually does keep disciplined when you hear that help is coming but oh….. wait, not really.

    These men and their commanders were heroes and should never have been put before an inquiry board. This make me ashamed for my country and it’s dedication to their most valuable people. But LBJ was a slime ball anyway so guess it’s expected he would act like that.

    • http://aol Bill

      You forget, the crew had plenty of time to dump the incriptor overboard to keep it out of Korean hands. Also, they could have fought back to the best of their ability while going flank speed towards Japan, or South Vietnam. They were not hero’s in my book. I was fighting for my life on Hill 64 at Khe Sanh at that time during the TET offensive. My Marine company 1/1/9th marines took 80% casulties during that two weeks. I’m still crippled from that action.

      • John

        Fight back with what?…..A WATER PISTOL????

  • http://aol Bill

    A note to remember is, on Jan 21, 1968 I was fighting for my life at Khe Sanh in Vietnam during the largest offensive in the Vietnam war. I believe the war department was terrified of opening a new front at this time.

  • http://charden@neo.rr.com Charles

    What was President Johnson,Democrat or Republican?I don`t believe
    President Bush would have let the North Koreans get away with something like this.I don`t know if Obama would or not.I would like
    to know why a ship such as the Pueblo was so far away from any ships or planes to begin with that could have helped her.IT doesn“t take a
    brain surgent to know you have to protect a ship of this nature.God bless the crew members of the Pueblo,they are really the true HEROS

    • momo

      Johnson was a Democrat.

    • Doug Rodrigues

      Lyndon B. Johnson was a corrupt, politically manipulating Democrat. The shame of what happened with the Pueblo is a perfect example of the worthlessness of politicians running the military. The only thing Johnson allowed was to put on a military display to “impress” the Communists, but not actually take any action to get the crew back. I believe Obama to be of the same mindset as Johnson.

  • Mike Hilliard

    I was released from military intelligence in our military in 1964 so I was already gone when this ship was taken. In fact I was out of the service when this ship was up-fitted for duty in ’66 – but I remained interested in all things ASA. I worked for the agency in Fort Monmouth, Fort Hancock, Fort Meade, NSA, Naval Security, the Pentagon, Sinop and Incirlik. My last 8 months was in Berlin at Rudow. I was assigned to a flight crew in Incirlik Air Base on a project named Farm Team and flew many, many assignments against the Russians. So I know from which I speak.

    I believe a response was not taken because of the socialist influence of Johnson. This idiot was responsible for beginning the steep decline of our intelligence and the decimation of our military forces due to his administration’s decision to kowtow to a lesser power. WTF??? He was a true hater of a free America too.

    His great society was a failure in this freedom loving America as was his inherited war in Indochina. In fact other than he being a back-slapper and one of the good-old-boys in congress what else did he screw up? Everything.

    The constitution states clearly and specifically – in section 8 of our Constitution that the Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes, duties, impost and excises, to pay the debts and PROVIDE FOR THE COMMON DEFENSE AND GENERAL WELFARE OF THE UNITED STATES… and so on.

    WHAT IS COMPLEX ABOUT THIS STATEMENT? It lays out the rules and tasks set out before our elected officials clearly and concisely.

    Today we find ourselves being RULED by another socialist who hates everything that we fought so hard to maintain. LIFE, LIBERTY AND THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS. I’m ashamed to be an American and live under this community organized who hates our way of life so deeply.

    When will we stand up to this mini-me tyrant and say “ENOUGH IS ENOUGH” ???

    • http://aol Bill

      You forgot this “hater” ??? LBJ was a bomber pilot in WW2 and was a highly decorated pilot with many combat missions? You are definatly a right wing hater of fellow Americans. You show what republicans are, hatemongers.

      • momo

        Johnson a bomber pilot? He was in the naval reserve, the closest he got to combat was when the B-26 he was flying on as an observer turned back from its mission due to generator problems. For some reason known only to God, McArthur awarded him the silver star. This is what Robert Caro stated in his biography of Johnson: “The most you can say about Lyndon Johnson and his silver star is that it is surely one of the most undeserved silver stars in history, because if you accept everything that he said, he was still in action for no more than 13 minutes and only as an observer. Men who flew many missions, brave men, never got a silver star.”

      • wayne

        He certainly must had a change of heart for some unknown reason. As a president h failed us.

      • Vigilant

        Bill, You’re thinking of George H. W. Bush. He was a bomber pilot in WWII. Get your facts straight, if you can manage to see thorugh your hate of the right.

      • Vicki

        Bill says:
        “(Stupid ad hominem attack deleted)”

        Well aparently history did not consider his bombing runs to be significant. No easy record of his being a bomber pilot. Got some facts somehere Bill?

        “Johnson’s political career began in earnest in 1937, when he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. Quickly earning respect as a smart and hardworking legislator, he was re-elected five times. After an unsuccessful run for a U.S. Senate seat in 1941, Johnson became the first member of Congress to volunteer for active duty in the military when the United States entered World War II (1939-45). He reported for active duty in December 1941 and served in the Navy as a lieutenant commander until all members of Congress in the military were recalled to Washington in the summer of 1942.
        http://www.history.com/topics/lyndon-b-johnson

        • Dan az

          Way to go vicki!

    • Pat R

      You People totally amaze me. Keep moaning and groaning about the UNITED STATES CORPORATION (our supposed-to-be government in the IMF owned and operated Washington DC.) Don’t believe me? Look it up.
      I post constantly about the Republic, but NO ONE wants to take the time to go to a website and HAVE THEIR EYES OPENED. Every thing on the site is “documented” proof about what is going on in America, from the 1860s to today!
      BE FREE or keep on being a slave to the “CORPORATION”

      http://www.republicfortheunitedstates.org

      • Vigilant

        I know you constantly post about the Republic, and we are wearying of it fast.

        To quote Wikipedia, “The District of Columbia Organic Act of 1871 is an Act of Congress, which revoked the individual charters of the City of Washington, the City of Georgetown, and the County of Washington and created a new city government for the entire District of Columbia. The legislation effectively merged what had been separate municipalities within the federal territory into a single entity. It is for this reason that the city, while legally named the District of Columbia, is still commonly known as Washington, D.C.”

        I’ve read the Act completely and it does nothing of the sort that you or those ambulance-chasing lawyers on Team Law or other sites claim it does. Have you read the act?

        My own village here in upstate NY has been “incorporated” for over a century, as have thousands of others in the USA. The 1871 act simply created a municipal corporation for the District of Columbia. All the claims of illegal government supplanting the Constitution are nothing more than weak attempts to stoke the fires of new world order conspiracy theories. “Laughable” is the kindest word I can use to describe it.

        Once and for all, the District of Columbia is incorporated, the United States is not a private corporation. Spend your time on something more legitimate than this.

        The NWO paranoia is VERY similar to the mindset of the Germans before and during WWII as regarded the Jews. In fact, it is an outgrowth of it, and carries with it the same anti-Semitism and hate-the-rich screeds that the socialists and communists are known for. It is disseminated for two reasons: to get you to not only distrust your government, nay, your very form of government, but also to sow the seeds that will result in the rebellion and chaos the statists so fervently desire.

        • Vigilant

          And, by the way, that site you referenced is nothing short of a treasonous attempt to overthrow the legitimate government of the United States. I suspect that DHS and FBI are taking names there, as they well should. Wake up before it’s too late.

  • Xarcht

    You know that we could have sent those men on a disinformation mission. That seems a likely event. And as to the 12 or 50 mile sea limit, there is always a nation that seeks more than internationally recognized. That incident will be in a fog of secrets and the real losers were the enlisted. They carry the shame of obeying orders and losing a ship that may have been sacrificed.

    • independant thinker

      The Pueblo was captured by North Korea on the orders of the Soviet Union. The Soviets wanted a piece of encoding/decoding equipment that was on the Pueblo. That piece of equipment plus the information furnished them by the Walker spy ring enabled them to read our most secure military radio transmissions at will for years.

  • CA Vet

    I was on duty at a unit of the 5th Air Force, Fuchu Air Station, Japan when the Peublo was assaulted and subsequently captured by the North Koreans in International Waters. I watched with incredulity as the hours passed without a show of force or defense of the hapless ship and her sailors. I remember being told the reason for inaction on the part of the Air Force in Japan was that our assets were configured for essentially a Chinese containment role and could not have been configured appropriately in time to have done anything about the ship’s capture. I remember my BS detector triggering because a couple of years before that I was on duty in Taiwan as the Gulf of Tonkin Incident unfolded; both incidents on President Johnson’s watch.

    One could surmise that when the Pueblo incident occurred all Defense Department eyes were fixed on the deteriorating situation in Viet Nam and the United States could not afford rekindling conflict on the Korean front. None-the-less our inaction over the Pueblo I find shameful. I was subsequently aghast when upon the crews release after a year in brutal captivity that the Navy wanted to courts martial the officers for dereliction of duty. Thank you Mr. Chaffey for not rubber stamping the Navy’s recommendation.

    As a military officer I find that period of our history odious and am very glad that I was fortunate that my assigned duties then did not put me in the position of poor Skipper Bucher…and many others…a no win situation caused by inept political decision makers.

    • Jimmy in NC

      I was a radioman/cyn3 stationed aboard the USS-Wright cc-2 when this act of war occured. The Wright and our sister ship the USS-Northhampton cc-1 were in the same line of work as the USS-Pueblo, I was appalled at the lack of response from the President and the Navy, their non-action had profound effects on me personally as I was contemplating a career in the service of the country I love. I feel that the government should have our(military’s) back especially when we put ourselve in harms way.I think the Navy & this nation should give the honor, respect & recognition these men richly deserve. I did not re-enlist as a result and the Navy lost the thousands of dollars spent on training and background checks for my Siop/TS clearance. I hope our government has learned a lesson but I fear it has not. I pray for those that served before me and after me. I will always remember. USNavy 1965-71

    • Mike In MI

      Hey, CA Vet – Thanks for your service, brother.
      BO stinks as bad or worse than LBJ (“Limp-wristed Bumbling Jackass) ever did. Just look a what his response was to the sinking of the S. Korean ship. He won’t fight against Muslim enemies of this nation of any stripe. Instead he wants to defend and shield them from justice. He won’t fight against or speak against (except lip to lip or while he’s doing his required show of obeisance) anything under a socialist or communist flag, either.
      But…just wait until he decides to move against the hated Tea Party or the even more despised people who claim to be Christians.
      You say he’d never do that? Where is the socialist system that hasn’t/
      Anybody who genuflects before Marx’s picture has absorbed the dicta that capitalism and religion are equally worthy of annihilation in all their forms and rites. So, if you’re a Christian, especially, be prepared to make a calculated answer: acknowledge or deny.

  • Henry Ledbetter

    Thanks Chip I remember the stories out of Washington and often wondered what was the truth of the matter. No wonder they don’t want this sordid history to be known as it would reveal the truth of the gutless wonders we had for leaders even in that day.

  • RHSchumann

    Yes, it is sad that this incident is all but forgotten. But as long as the ship is commissioned by the US Navy your claim that it has been abandoned by our leaders is not correct. Firing the machine gun would have been futile but the crew should have destroyed all classified material before the ship was entered – especially the cipher machine. Your article didn’t state whether the crew was successful. Yes, the Navy could have sunk the Pueblo including the American crew. And yes, the US could have started another war. Those responsible had to make difficult decissions. Concerning the later inquiry, that is standard procedure if for no other reason to clear the Captain of wrong doing. That obviously happened because he continued on active duty.
    While you are at it, why not also mention another ship of the same category that was attacked in the Mediterranean with much loss of life? The US also did nothing about that attack but nobody dare criticize the country that attacked the ship and killed many American sailors nor those in the USA who failed to censure that country.

  • JoMama

    It sounds as if Obama was in the White House at the time, doesn’t it??
    Sad story. What’s even sadder is that NOTHING was done to save these BRAVE men!! Our leaders are such losers – no matter who they are/were.
    Is being politically correct better than being a hero or a patriot – even then?? It just keeps getting WORSE & WORSE.
    What is this country coming to?? Political correctness be damned. I’m going to be ‘politically correctnessed challenged’ from now on.

    Where’s the birth certificate???

    • JoMama

      Excuse me – those brave men.

  • Michael Hudspeth

    It is well chronicled that LBJ micro-managed the military in Vietnam to the point of selecting daily bombing targets with the Joint Chiefs standing by for his decisions. Then there was the Liberty and Pueblo incidents under his watch. Clinton and his SecDef did the same, dis-regarding the on-site commander’s request for armor (tanks)in Somalia resulting in the military debacle and loss of American lives as depicted in the movie “Blackhawk Down”. Obama showed the same proclivity to micro-manage the Navy and the SEALS during the Somalia Piracy incident. Fortunately the ship’s Captain and the SEAL Commander were willing to put their careers on the line and take decisive action (for which Obama took credit once the decisive action proved successful). Unfortunately, this inability of politicians to make a decisive response is not limited to Democrats (Reagan’s response to the Marine Barracks Bombing and President Bush’s (Bush 1) lack of response to the Peruvian Air Force shooting up of a USAF C-130 with loss of life). Politicians take note: Delegate authority to the professionals you selected to lead and back their decisions made on the front lines. If the US mounted a massive and decisive response to attacks upon its military and diplomatic facilities and personnel, these attacks and provocations would cease.

  • TF

    I was in the Navy then on the USS Coral Sea and our ship DID steam into the Sea of Japan headed towards N. Korea. I worked on the flight deck at the time and we were told about the taking of the Pueblo and that we were going to take it back. Because of the cold we were issued face masks designed to protect our faces from frostbite and when I looked at the label inside I found that it was made in 1945.
    Sadly, we stood down after we got halfway there. It’s equally sad that our spineless leaders are willing to leave their military men hanging.

    • http://????? A H Mitchell

      I was on the Coral Sea sometime in 66. I was on the Big E during the time the Pueblo was snatched. We went from tee shirts in the Tonkin Gulf, to snow on the flight deck. You got face masks? The “E” was on site with in 72 hrs. We were doing flight Opps with ice on the deck. I wonder where they were flying? You got face masks?

  • Billy

    JFK MAY have done something…we will never know…Reagan, maybe also….but neither Bush nor Clinton…just a bunch of sissy girly-men. Yes, Bush#1 WAS a WWII hero…that was long ago. He and his son are just dust (and pension) collectors now. They, along with others, have effectively tied the hands of our brave men and women; ignorant “Rules of Engagement”, Political Correctness and on and on. The USA is in a state of decline, and has been since the mid 60′s. Sad but true.

    • wayne

      Billy, it is this way because of our gutless leaders, and the fact the American people don’t stand up and demand that their leaders get a backbone. We have become a nation of whiners, and wanting everything given to us. We are such a divided nation now that we would definately lose aanother war if it was like WW2. The biggest percentage of the military men back then had what it took to be a good soldier. My bother served served in Gemany from 1942 through the duration of the war. He was an old farm boy that had what the military needed to win i that war.

  • WBradley

    The U.S. also left hundreds of POW’s behind in RVN. This is not a legend. It happened. Adequate evidence exists to verify this, but no one cares but the families of those left behind. These families were sorely abused by government officials in their quest for answers.
    I hope one day this matter is officially revealed.

  • Robert H Meek JR

    I was stationed in the ROK with the 7th Division at the time. It was quite testy as we weren’t sure whether the North was planning an invasion since we were so heavily engaged in Vietnam. The 2nd Division was in front of us on the DMZ. The two American division were only supposed to hold for 3 days and the 2nd was expected to take 95% casualties and the 7th 85%. Without tactical nukes, I doubt we could have held three days as both divisions were way under strength. The really sad thing was Johnson had been a Navy officer in WWII and he let a Navy ship get captured.
    Robert H Meek JR
    Colonel USAR(R)

    • Vigilant

      Col. Meek, the US had jet-mounted tactical nukes in ROK at that time. Like Japan, these armaments existed against the Status of Forces agreements in both countries, but both countries overlooked it.

  • Ex-Sub Officer

    I remember!! Capt. Bucher had been a submarine officer before his command of Pueblo. The night before he sailed from Yokoska, he was at a small submarine officer’s club we had on base. Just a place we could get off the sub while in port.
    We had been on a “WesPac” tour for two months and were ready to return to our home port of San Diego several days after Pueblo left. Two AM, the night we were schedule to leave, we were ordered to remove all the “junk” that we’d bought in Japan to take home and load “war stores”! That is 60 days of food and a full load of torpedoes. Before noon that day, we were on the way to the Sea of Japan to play tag with Russian submarines, We were on station for the next six weeks before we were relieved by another US Sub. Yes, we were sure we would end up actually using those “fish”.

  • BobDin

    I was stationed in South Korea when this happened several before coming back to the states. All leaves and ETS’s were canceled and all units went on alert. We were all nervous but eager to go North Korea to get our fellow servicemen. Most where upset when we where ordered to stand down. To this day I still feel is was a big mistake.

  • Phil

    I remember this well. Johnson was gutless when it came to dealing with any of the communist forces. Another naval cover up was the USS Liberty. This was a sister ship that was attacked and severly shot up by the Isrealies in 1967. Same thing, we did nothing.

  • Delores Smith

    CHIP WOOD – THANK YOU FOR REMINDING US OF THE PUEBLO…
    Chip, I would have lied and told the Pueblo that “Help is on the way, just to give them hope.” Three members of my family are buried at Arlington National Cemetery.
    If they didn’t have hope, most would not have survived.
    The USS Pueblo is one of the many reasons Johnson was a one-term president. God Bless the men of the USS Pueblo for what they endured. We must take time to study Obama, and know that he is leading to a Dictatorship. In your dreams, Obama! Americans are not stupid. We will expose everything that you are doing, along with George Sorsos who recommends that you govern America by Executive Order for the next two years. Put your pen away and use the Checks and Balances of Congress and the Supreme Court.
    Delores Smith Delores109@cox.net

  • DaveH

    If, indeed, the story is true, it is a sickening episode in our military history. Our leaders cower when they shouldn’t, and get involved when they shouldn’t. Kind of an upside-down world.
    The thing is that I just don’t believe most of what our Government tells us these days. My heart goes out to all the military personel who are just being used as pawns by the leaders.

  • Lesperance

    The capture of the Pueblo continued to have a ripple effect on our operations and practices in the cryptographic community for years, perhaps decades. I was in high school when the Pueblo was captured and later, while serving in the Navy as a technician, we were required to install periodic modifications to our cryptographic equipment in order prevent the Soviets from successfully utilizing the equipment captured from the Pueblo and elsewhere to copy our communications. While serving in the fleet in the mid ’70s I had the misfortune of unknowingly working with an associate of John Walker, the traitor mentioned in Chip’s article, who at that time was still spying for the Soviets. It came to light in the mid 80′s, after the Walker spy ring had been broken, that this individual associated with Walker had also, during the mid 70′s, been gathering design and modification data on cryptographic equipment carried aboard our ship and passing that information to Walker, who subsequently passed it to his KGB handlers. This enabled the Soviets to decipher our strategic and tactical communications in many areas and represented what Casper Weinberger, Secretary of Defense in Reagan’s administration, described
    as the worst breach of security in American history. John Walker undoubtedly was one of the causes of the capture of the USS Pueblo, and because of his enabling the Soviets to read our sensitive communications through the years, he undoubtedly contributed to the deaths US personnel during the Cold War and the Vietnam conflict.

  • Fly On The Wall

    Overheard in the bowels of the Pentagon:

    “Hmmm Let’s see, who can I deploy today?? I’ve got it! Let’s send this really slow tugboat (speeds: snail, grandma, reverse) into international waters on a super-dangerous spy mission! Missiles? Bah! Too expensive, they don’t need ‘em. Backup from faster ships and/or aircraft? Nah, too much expenditure. What’s the worst that can happen?

    Awesome plan! Time for lunch break, boys!”

  • Delores Smith

    CHIP WOOD,
    Sorry about the typo in my prior post. It is George SOROS who has urged obama to govern America by Executive Order for the next two years. I like to give discredit where discredit is due. Soros, go back to Germany. You are boring me. Leave America alone.
    Delores Smith Delores109@cox.net

  • http://Outdoorsunlimited.net ENC/DV

    I remember, and was angry, I have been there, and it was on the E8 exam
    God forbid we back down in the face on the World.

  • http://boblivingston Hawkeye

    Ya we should’a stuck a H-bomb up their tail pipe and put an end to that slap. What business they got capturing our spy boat in their costal waters anyway. Do they not know Maritime Law don’t apply to us, just the little folk.

    Course if we nuked um we would also have had to glass China and the USSR all at one time, before they could get their missiles fired off. After all, in for a few million, might just as well go for a few billion souls. But, if any of us were still alive when the smoke settled, in a few thousand years, we sure wouldn’t have to deal with them Commies no more and we’d have all the oil we needed to kill the rest of the planet.

    • misterbee

      “What business they got capturing our spy boat in their costal waters anyway”

      Yeah, genius. First our ship was forced into PRNK territorial waters, then attacked. I also remember that in April of ’69 we had a “Willy Victor” from VQ 1 shot down 90 miles off the coast of NK. And the same gang of America-hating maggots who faulted the U.S. about Peublo raced to the nearest microphone to condemn us for flying over open seas.

      (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EC-121_shootdown_incident_)

      I had just come back from back from Da Nang. Some of those killed on that 121 were friends of mine.

      Oh, and by the way, jopa, if you think you were getting anything from “Uncle Walter” other than Leftist sewage, guess again. He was godfather to Dan “fake but accurate” Rather. Not for nothing is it known as “SeeBS”.

  • johnnywoo

    In 1968,we needed a man like Teddy R.and R.Reagan who took no crap off any nation!Any one of these men,would have sent a high flying bomber,(a few days later)and blowen the ship to pieces!

  • Carlucci

    I have heard of the Pueblo, but did not know the story. I was 12 years old in 1968 and my parents were so against the Vietnam conflict that my siblings and I weren’t allowed to watch the news on t.v.

    This story is awful, but not surprising. From what I’ve read, LBJ was as bad as Jimma Carter, always kissing the a***es of countries that hate America.

    In 1989 my husband and I were flying from Seoul to Tokyo. At the airport that morning there were dozens of U.S. soldiers there, sitting at a little coffee shop. When they saw us come in for coffee while we waited for our flight, their faces lit up with big smiles and loud “good mornings!!”. They were so happy to see a couple of Americans, and were very curious about where we were from, what brought us to Seoul (tourism), etc. I will never forget that,
    and say prayers for all in the armed forces to this day.

  • wayne

    Are their any liberal (Democrats) on here that is going to defend these two liberal Democratic presidents. Or will you be taking a back seat? Liberals, there is not any way to defend the two presidents, Johnson and Truman. This is recent history that many of us remembers.

  • Ace Sez

    Will we ever have a President or other elected officials “with the balls” to counter-act the political correct BS that infests our gov’t ??

    Rules of engagement are gettin’ our military ppl killed unnessesarily—we have the ways and means to fight to the death (of any enemy) and deterr any BS threats from the likes of Russia, China, Middle East pirates and terrorists of all stripes–just no balls on the ppl making the decisions–The pansie-ass in the White House is the weakest of all the past decision makers in our history–and it bodes no good for the USA til we can replace him–impeachment and imprisonment should be taking place right now !!

  • JohnnyK

    All you have to do to learn more about the Pueblo incident is google USS Pueblo. Most of the idiots posting here are just anti Democrat.

    • wayne

      JohnnyK, did you ever think you just might be an anticonservative? Facts are facts. It’s hard to dispute the facts. If you have the evidence to dispute anh of this, then please share the facts you have. Please leave out the hot air.

    • Stan Smith

      Hey Libtard JohnnyK Those so called anti democraps on this board that served in the military they been there they witness the facts of this tragedy!

  • chick

    BoB,, I think you ment to say 1950 til present… we are still there,and still shot’s being fired.. the goverment just don’t want you to know about it

  • Roy

    As stated by the Author–The DEMOCRATIC Republic Of N. Korea. There’s your Reason for the Johnsonian Failure to act. What in Hell would You Expect from another Commie Democrat. Every Commie Nation is The Democratic Republic of–.

  • Robert Ryan

    I cleaerly remember this incident. I was in Vietnam at the time. If you want to know about another atrocity against United States Navy Sailors. Look up the incident involving the USS LIBERTY. You will be shocked about the cover up still going on about this incident. You might also be suprised as to who commited the atrocity against the USS LIBERTY. As to the Pueblo crew I remember the photo they took all with flasing the bird. The crew told the North Koreans it was a Hawaiian greeting.

  • Lawrence Harris

    While you are talking about the Goverment doing nothing in response to a direct attack; perhaps you should mention the USS Liberty. Attacked by a “friendly” nation and abandoned by its country, as well.
    Did we really allow this to happen, Dad? You damn well bet we did. Another sordid affair by “leaders”.

  • Howard R Gray

    This incident is an outrage; more to the point the Pueblo is still an exhibit in North Korea. Given we now have laser guidance systems and GPS accuracy, why hasn’t it been dispatched, at least to discourage communist tourism if nothing else?

    There are a number of questions that come to mind about this incident. Why wasn’t the ship scuttled if there was no protection from our naval power within reach? Are we to believe that the high command of the Navy were happy to send an almost unarmed military spy ship into intensely hostile waters without any back up at all? Demolition charges should have been easily accessible on such a ship should it be threatened with capture and a crew evacuation plan in place. These are all matters of command planning not the responsibility of the crew. If help was not at hand, the crew should have abandoned ship and destroyed all sensitive materials and scuttled the ship in minutes of the position being understood to be hopeless. It is no use that the high command of the Navy putting the blame on the crew, ships such as this should always be designed for instant dispatch should there be no hope of assistance. Two things are essential, entire rapid destruction of all sensitive equipment and spy materials on the one hand, and rapid sinking of the ship on the other. All voyages of spying should ensure that there is always enough water beneath the ship if at all possible to eliminate easy dive access to the scuttled vessel. Have these ideas penetrated the military planner’s minds to this date? One other point, there should be a scuttling drill regularly like lifeboat and fire drills so that the crew can set up the evasion process in minutes with ease. All ships of war should have a planned sensitive document and equipment elimination drill for those responsible for keeping secrets on board. Perhaps the Pueblo incident should have got that through to the planners but did it?

    It is totally unacceptable for a ship of war that isn’t seriously armed to be placed in danger of capture without recourse to at least prevent the ship falling into enemy hands. No doubts those who planned the missions of this ship were never examined at length by any court of enquiry. As usual with military debacles such as this, those responsible go free of all responsibility.

    It is to the crew’s great credit that most of them survived such an incident, the raw courage of the captain to put an insult into the confession to signal contempt for his captors and to invalidate the confession itself was beyond measure, death would have been the certain punishment had he been discovered. How these men were treated by those above them on their return perhaps explains why the incident isn’t “remembered” but does not excuse the command structure from their obvious incompetence in sending a spy ship and its crew into a lion’s den in the first place.

    Message to the wise in Navy command circles, this could easily happen again the North Koreans torpedoed a South Korean ship recently, they do these things. Are our evacuation security plans in place, have crews been drilled? I hope so, another Pueblo could easily happen.

    • independant thinker

      All the crew had to use for destruction of the sensative equipment on board was a couple of axes. They had no explosives to use for either destroying the equipment or sinking the ship.

  • bob wire

    you people are really sick, you know that?

    Johnson was in the middle of a rock fight.

    If there was anything Johnson could have done and not harmed the captives, he’d done it.

    Johnson wouldn’t have thought twice about wiping his a$$ with any commie agent. Evidently you don’t know LB.

    • Pat R

      Don’t even go there! Johnson was a “Socialist” commie!!!!

      • bob wire

        If that be so, what does that make you? ~ more then two or three words would be most helpful.

    • independant thinker

      Johnson was more interested in enriching his wife thru her company Brown Root than anything. Brown Root illegaly purchased government surplus and turned huge profits on it.

  • jopa

    What is all this LBJ talk give it up and let it go already.Let’s talk about how well the wars of today are handled like going into Iraq and hauling out those WMD’s.Making sure the leader and his children are put to death and we were not supposed to lose one soldier.They were going to greet us with rose petals fluttering to the ground when they receive their freedom.And the best is yet to come.The whole war will be paid with Iraqi oil money.Will Bush be remembered as the greatest warrior of all time.Not.

    • Michael J.

      jopa,
      So much anger will shorten your lifespan, we hopa.

      • Dan az

        michael your killing me lmao!

  • http://www.DownsizeCa.org JKeyes

    I remember. I was on the mission to go help the Pueblo..

  • Bert Cundle

    That was a Sacrifice Peace Keeping Manuver! Our Government is Diabalical!!!

    • Bert Cundle

      Bigger Errors… V.N., Cuba, IRAQ, Desert Storm, Packastan, (ALABAMA.)

    • Bert Cundle

      We have Politicans Selling out our Country…

      • http://deleted Claire

        They “sold” us out way back then, and continue to sell us out. I am all for “getting along” with foreign countries, however, I would not allow them to step on my toes, not once. I would not be pushed around. Sorry folks, I am a fighter. I fight for what I believe in. I don’t go around looking for a fight, but let the enemy strike the first blow, and I would make damn sure they would never strike the second blow.

        • libertytrain

          I tend to feel the same way.

  • jopa

    There was no coverup on the Pueblo incident. Anyone in their teens on up if they watched news it was on CBS wth Uncle Walter.However I was not aware it was not written into the history books of today.Perhaps it had something to do with todays books being written in Texas and LBJ was from Texas.Perhaps they don’t want another embarrassment put upon them.

    • http://deleted Claire

      jopa–Sorry, but LBJ was not the person he should have been.

      • bob wire

        LBJ was like so many others that can before, He was the man we needed when we needed them.

        Now you don’t have to agree, ~ but until you learn how to put the bullet back in the gun after it’s left the barrel and quit talking like a Monday morning armchair quarterback you might to learn to live with it.

        Black folks wasn’t truly allowed to vote until 1964. Now that’s not right!

        I ‘m sure many of you would like to go back 50 or 100 years, ~but I can tell you now, it’s not going to happen.

        Why must some of you people always attempt to tear people down that have stood up and made any difference in your miserable lives? Like a pack of hungry wolves.

        What in the Flock have you ever do? Served? Well me too, ~ So just how much does the rest of us owe you for your service? ~ Maybe we can pay you off and you be gone.

        I’ve sacked up my share of body bags and I tell you now , I don’t approve of your tenor and anti-American talk.

        • http://deleted Claire

          I wonder if you are aiming your post at me, or all of us?

          • Michael J.

            Hello Claire,
            Bob’s dis-jointed rhetoric is often hard to follow with it’s scattered snippets of clarity. I don’t think it was meant for you, you’re too nice.

          • http://deleted Claire

            Michael J–Thank you, but I think I am becoming meaner, more hard-nosed. Sometimes in this world and in some situations a person has to thicken their skin, I guess this is one of them.

          • bob wire

            No Claire, not intended for you. You keep a metered and civil tongue about yourself ~ always! and I admire and respect you for that.

            Lyndon was not a Saint, he wasn’t maybe even a nice man. But in one of America’s darkest hours Lyndon rose to the occasion and he was a very effective politician for the DNC and brought a sense of unity to the nation when it was needed. Was there to be short coming, repercussions and growing pains? Of course! You point out any “one” strong leader when there was NOT.

            I was responding to a long summary of LBJ bashing.

  • http://n/a John Beach

    As a supervisor of Russian Voice Intercept operators on the Aleutian Island of Shemya from August 1967 to March 1968, a part of the intelligence community’s global network of electronic and signal intelligence intercept stations, we were privy to the communications and Daily Intelligence Bulletins that dealt with major events concerning the U.S. Military and international relations at that time. We all expected that there would be some immediate response to aid the Pueblo. Whether the treatment of the U.S.S. Liberty during the Israeli Six-Day War of June, 1967 had set some sort of precedent regarding the legal propriety of intelligence-gathering tactics and a policy of defense or justifiability of response in the event of capture or attack on a U.S. Ship or installation, or played any role at all in the case of the Pueblo, is only known by the officers in Washington at the time. Everybody on Shemya was anticipating that the commander in Japan would send aircraft to help the Pueblo. We never understood why the U.S. did not respond forcefully to ensure the safety of the ship and crew. The piece of crypto gear, a KW-7 (google it) that the Soviets wanted was taken from the ship and sent by plane from Pyongyang to Moscow within a day or two of the ship’s arrival in Wonsan Harbor. Our intelligence was so good at that time that we knew when and on what aircraft the piece of gear was sent.
    Given the policies which led to the total failure of the Viet Nam war, it is really not surprising, in retrospect, that we did nothing to prevent the capture and torture of the crew and the loss of the ship. It remains a disgrace in the minds of many who served at that time that our response was as “wimpy” as it was.
    “A Matter of Accountability: The True Story of the Pueblo Affair” by Trevor Armbrister is recommended reading for detailed information concerning the entire incident.

    • http://workingonthat.com Billy Jumper

      I know the crypto gear spoken of here. The machine was worthless in itself without the daily codes.

      • independant thinker

        They had the daily codes from the Walker spy ring.

  • George W. Wolf

    I was aboard the USS Kearsage attached to VS25(anti-sub sqd) on loan to AIMD to run the electronic repair shop sailing to Southeast Asia when we were diverted to Sea of Japan because of the USS Pueblo capture. We were one of the first to arrive and started launching sub patrols(we were an ASW carrier). The crews came back with stories of the hugh Russian presence. The cold was almost unbearable on the flight deck and antennas were snapping off the aircraft on launch so we had to manufacture antennas out of more suitable material so the aircraft could have a complete package of electronics. Later I was in Okinawa with a VP squadron and the North Koreans (again) shot down an air force EC121 and it seemed like a repeat. I spent 30 years in the Navy retiring in 1977. Thanks for the memories.

    • George W. Wolf

      Correction on the ship my Jan21st was USS YORKTOWN not Kearsage. Old age caught up with my memory!!

  • wayne

    This is for those who support the Democratic President L Johnson:

    On June 8, 1967, US Navy intelligence ship USS Liberty was suddenly and brutally attacked on the high seas in international waters by the air and naval forces of Israel. The Israeli forces attacked with full knowledge that this was an American ship and lied about it. Survivors have been forbidden for 40 years to tell their story under oath to the American public. The USS Liberty Memorial web site tells their story and is dedicated to the memory of the 34 brave men who died.

    The Attack

    After surveilling USS Liberty for more than nine hours with almost hourly aircraft overflights and radar tracking, the air and naval forces of Israel attacked our ship in international waters without warning. USS Liberty was identified as a US naval ship by Israeli reconnaissance aircraft nine hours before the attack and continuously tracked by Israeli radar and aircraft thereafter. Sailing in international waters at less than five knots, with no offensive armament, our ship was not a military threat to anyone.

    The Israeli forces attacked without warning and without attempting to contact us. Thirty four Americans were killed in the attack and another 174 were wounded. The ship, a $40-million dollar state-of-the-art signals intelligence platform, was later declared unsalvageable and sold for scrap.

    The Cover Up

    Despite a near-universal consensus that the Israeli attack was made with full knowledge that USS Liberty was a US Navy ship, the Johnson administration began an immediate cover-up of this fact. Though administration officers continued individually to characterize the attack as deliberate, the Johnson administration never sought the prosecution of the guilty parties or otherwise attempted to seek justice for the victims. They concealed and altered evidence in their effort to downplay the attack. Though they never formally accepted the Israeli explanation that it was an accident, they never pressed for a full investigation either. They simply allowed those responsible literally to get away with murder.

    In an ongoing effort to reveal the truth about the attack, the USS Liberty Veterans Association has filed with the Secretary of the Army in the manner prescribed by law a detailed, fully documented Report of War Crimes describing the circumstances of the attack on our ship and evidence that it was a crime under international law. In accordance with international law and treaties, the United States is obligated to investigate the allegations. So far, the United States has declined even to acknowledge that the report has been filed. The full text of the report can be found at http://www.gtr5.com/evidence/warcrimes.pdf

  • Michael Hudspeth

    Just discovered that John Anthony Walker is not only still alive and incarcerated within the Bureau of Prisons but will be eligible for parole in four more years. This person, while on active duty with the US Navy, sold the Soviets with the codes for the cryptographic machine sought by the Soviets. According to the article, this led the Soviets to use their North Korean proxies to capture the USS Pueblo resulting in the death of a US sailor. The public should demand that Attorney General Holder prosecute Walker and his co-conspirator for conspiracy resulting in a homicide and seek the death penalty. Walker had already plea bargained his espionage conviction. At present Walker is in a Bureau of Prisons hospital facility (diabetes and throat cancer) and the public is stuck with paying for his medical treatment. The United States needs to begin executing people who commit espionage while in military or sworn government service (Ames & Hanssen).

  • Bradley

    Thank you Mr. Wood for publishing this article. I have a personal connection to the Pueblo my wife’s brother (Tom Massie) was on that ship. It’s hard when our country doesn’t remember or help out the survivors.

  • Vigilant

    Many of the comments here are critical of LBJ, but a review of history will show that the Republicans are no strangers to backing down either.

    As a young Airman at Misawa AB, Japan at the time, I remember the incident very well. There was talk of cooling off the steam heating tunnels on base to be used as shelters if it came to nuclear war. We were 400 miles due east of Vladivostock, a major Soviet ICBM base.

    As a “Security Police Augmentee,” I was put out on a taxiway with my M-16 and field radio in the blowing snow. Don’t know what kind of good that did, but it was a memorable experience.

    All of us decried the lack of action by LBJ, and looked forward to the 1968 elections. Nixon, as part of his campaign, criticized Johnson extensively, and said that he would never let anything like that happen again. And guess what? It happened again, very shortly into Nixon’s term, a little more than a year after the Pueblo incident. This time 31 Americans were killed.

    The Navy EC-121 reconnaissance plane used to stop off at Misawa AB for refueling, and I remember it well. If I’m not mistaken, I remember it was on the flight line on May 16, 1968 when we suffered a major earthquake. The plane was rocking so much it seemed as if the wings would touch the tarmac. But the danger it faced that day was nothing compared to what happened the following year.

    From Wilipedia: “The EC-121 shootdown incident occurred on 15 April 1969 when a United States Navy Lockheed EC-121M Warning Star on a reconnaissance mission was shot down by North Korean MiG-17 aircraft over the Sea of Japan. The plane crashed 90 nautical miles (167 km) off the North Korean coast and all 31 Americans on board were killed.

    “The Nixon administration chose not to retaliate against North Korea apart from staging a naval demonstration in the Sea of Japan a few days later. Instead it resumed the reconnaissance flights within a week to demonstrate that it would not be intimidated by the action while at the same time avoiding a confrontation.”

    So let’s think twice before we condemn a Democrat for failing to take action, when a Republican followed in the same footsteps, even when the loss of life was greater.

    • http://deleted Claire

      Vigilant: Good point. Both parties have had miltary fiascos.

  • hundabuxt

    One of the few thing’s I admire about the Russians is that if you do something to piss them off like the incidents above, they’re coming after you no matter what the world think’s and its going to hurt. I don’t like Russians, nor do I trust them and I feel they’ll always be our enemy, but don’t mess with them unless you’re willing to take the consequences unlike our gutless leaders.

  • Jim Pelant

    43 years I believe, I was on the USS Topeka coming out of the Panama Canal going to our home port of Long Beach CA. Most onboard wanted to go West and skip Long Beach.

    • http://tanah.asia/upcoming.php tanah.asia

      Hey just wanted to give you a quick heads up and let you know a few of the images
      aren’t loading correctly. I’m not sure why but I think its
      a linking issue. I’ve tried it in two different internet browsers and both show the same results.

  • Flo

    Our government has been leading the people down the primrose path for more years than I can remember. Communism is their goal and the military is their way of getting us there. Soros and Obama are just pawns in the big scheme.
    God have mercy on America,she will never be the same she once was!!!!

  • Joseph

    What about the USS Liberty which was attacked by the Israelis one year earlier ? The Israeli butchers murdered 34 crewmen and injured 175 others. They even sent in torpedo boats to strafe the lifeboast the crew lowered into the water. The criinal Israelis wanted to leave no survivors ! See the BBC documentary “Dead in the Water” on youtube .

  • Johnny Machine

    The big difference between the Pueblo incident and the USS Liberty is that Israel passes itself off as an ally. It seems that this friendship is only on one side. The Israelis will pay lip service to the fiction as long as the billions of dollars come in every year.

    • bob wire

      USS Liberty incident is the one I have serious problems with. I can understand the other.

      Israel attempted wash the world clean of any evidence, thinking nothing of these men’s lives.

      I believe Israel needs to be a free agent today, much like America from Britain.

  • Sam

    LBJ was a less than stalwart leader of the nation. I’ve always believed he was heavily involved in a lot of terrible actions (including, but not limited to, the assassination of John Kennedy, and of course the escalation of the Vietnam War debacle. His only display of any guts when he was pushing the infamous ‘war on poverty’ issue, and even that was a disaster. Do you think a man of this nature could’ve done anything positive about the USS Pueblo situation? No way!

    • Vigilant

      Nixon was even more gutless. See my post above.

      • bob wire

        Maybe so, if you feel that way but Nixon was the best GOP president since Eisenhower. Nixon’s National and International achievements exceeds Ford, Reagan and the two Srubbs.

        • Vigilant

          bob,

          Nixon did a great number of good things, I agree. I won’t give him an “A” becuase of some of the things he did that were not Kosher.

          He froze wages and prices, an economic tactic that was quasi-socialistic and did nothing to cure the secular trend of inflation. Secondly, he got us off the gold standard, a move that at least partially accounts for our economic woes of today.

          As for Watergate, well, I guess that was just bad luck.

          • bob wire

            Yes Vigilant, Nixon was a flawed man and in the end broke under the pressure.

            and the freeze, 1,2 & 3 was more of an effort to slow ~ rather then control.

            and yes, I was on the sucking end of it for some time.

    • independant thinker

      Johnson made a foutune off the Vietnam war thru his wife’s company Brown Root Enginering.

      • bob wire

        Perhaps, but pales to Chaney and Haliburton.

        • http://deleted Claire

          bob wire– I’ll have to agree with you this comment.

  • Dick

    Few people know that 14 days after the incident Military units had been deployed, action plans coordinated and the rescue operation was only waiting for the location of the crew for the plan to be executed. Intellegence could not locate where the crew was being held and the operation could not be executed.

  • Ned Pederson

    A similar event took place a little over one year later when a C-121 was shot down off North Korea, losing 31 lives. Richard Nixon was in the President and did not want another war, as Vietnam was in full swing.

  • chuckb

    you not only blame johnson for his failure to stand up against n korea during the pueblo incident, it would never have happened if truman hadn’t done the same thing during the korean war.

    • http://deleted Claire

      chuckb– I have to agree with you. If I had been the POTUS during the USS Pueblo crisis, I would have gone after the North Koreans like King Kong. Same with the Korean War. I would have gone in, did what I had to do and get out. In simple words, I would have cleaned house, no pussyfooting around. I would NOT be defeated. In these current times, I would react the same way. No fooling around, if they “pushed” me once, they would never be able to “push” me the second time.

  • Daniel from TN

    Chip, I’m afraid you have one fact mixed up. The captain ordered his men to NOT destroy equipment and documents. Double check your information. Many people were upset because he was not court-martialed for that very reason. I know because I remember the Pueblo incident and I was one of the people who was upset.

    • Vigilant

      Daniel, kindly provide your references. Every one I looked at said he ordered both equipment and documents destroyed. Turned out many documents remained that were very damaging to US security.

      Why would a captain not order them destroyed? According to Wikipedia, “Commander Bucher was never found guilty of any indiscretions and continued his Navy career until retirement in the rank of Commander.” If he had ordered the preservation of the equipment, that definitely would have been an “indiscretion” at the very least.

      • independant thinker

        Attempts were made to destroy the equipment but all the crew had for this was axes. They did what they could but were unable to destroy enough to matter.

  • partz-i-use

    I was at my duty station when the incident occurred. We were put on high alert at the time and made aware of the situation throughout the initial incident. This went on until the incident was completed and our fearful leaders lowered our alert level.

    My duty station was a listening base with very much the same equipment and orders as the crew of the Pueblo. Being a small installation, we wondered about our safety and how we would be affected by a capturing Army. The reason we wondered was because of the way the incident was handled by our fearful leaders. That in itself was questionable.

    I remember placing large phospherous flares on our equipment to be used to destroy it if needed. One thing known for sure, was whoever pulled the chords to ignite the flares would undoubtedly join the equipment in its destructive melt down.

    Commanding Officer Bucher and his crew would have been better off if they had begun destroying their equipment when they were first fired upon. The incident wouldn’t have been as damaging to our security as it became.

    Knowing what the reaction was of our leaders and military, led most of us to believe that if we ever came under attack, we were going to be toast.

  • Fast Freddy

    I too remember the Pueblo incident, I was never more ashamed of our country’s leaders non-response. LBJ and his weak-kneed administration deserved to be booted out of office for allowing our sailors to be held and brutalized by the Korean commies for almost a year. I have to wonder though if our current administration along with our gay-infested state department headed by Hillary would do anything different,[ other than mindless and ineffective jibber-jabber that is.]

  • David

    You never negotiate from a position of weakness!!!!

  • David

    And to all you that served, thank you and God bless you. If I ever become filthy rich I will buy you all mansions.

  • Idylewylde

    Negotiating with Commies does not work.

    In 68′, our illustriouis government did a bomb halt of North Viet Nam to give Hanoi an opportunity to engage in dialogue.
    I was at hill 999 up in I Corps at the time. The NVA used the bombing halt to bring in a tank .. yes, a tank .. and boy did things get interesting.

    By the time we rounded up some LAWs to go after the tank, they’d diassembled it, put it on sledges, and dragged it back over the mountains.

    Every time you try to be reasonable with Commies, or any other terrorists, they use the opportunity to make you pay.

    Has Obama learned form any of our past mistakes?

    Depends on which side he’s on, doesn’t it?

  • David

    What happened to the old American way? One shot a hundred thousand kills.

  • David

    Obama has learned his wifes taste in clothing fits a dumpster diver.

    • bob wire

      I found her dress most becoming.

  • http://Illinois'17th Old Henry

    Chip:

    I lived thru that time. Thank you so much for the reminder. There is so much TO remember sometimes we just get all caught up / wound up in current affairs.

  • robert craft

    yes i do remember the puibio.i was aboard the America at that time.we should have had Truman as president instead of Johnson.at least this man had guts.

  • Cat

    All of this reminds me of the “Report From Iron Mountain,” which
    reveals the Global Conspiracy of both population reduction, & wasting a country’s wealth. And their most effective way to do it is through
    borrowing money (at interest) to support endless wars, & then never winning them; sabotaging the cause (they usually create in the first place) through delberate military blunders, & hand tying. These elitists want to own the world, thin the population down to a controlable broken, ill, & impoverished slave class. They are identified in the Bible as those who are “Drunk on the Blood of Saints.” So many brave heroes have died for nothing other than enriching central bankers & their bought & paid for political class, while we are told we’re free, & go fighting to champion our kind of freedom all over the world. If we want real freedom for ourselves & all deserving human beings, we have to wake up to these lies. It’s finally starting to happen, at least with some people. You can’t
    fool all of the people, all of the time.

    • Michael J.

      Cat,
      Thank God for the internet. Otherwise it would be way harder to know things like: JFK commisioned the study that resulted in the creation of the Iron Mountain Report. JFK’s question which inspired the study was, “What would happen if world wide peace broke out”? JFK was shocked and dismayed with the conclusions arrived at by the experts who conducted the study. It’s been quite some time since I have read the report, so I apologize in advance if my recollection is a bit scetchy, but I recall the gist of the strategy was that in the event of world peace and thus the end of wars, a replacement revenue generator would be required to maintain status quo. Some of the fear producing scenarios suggested were beleive it or not, alien invasion (from outer space that is). One of the other suggestions was an eviromental up-heaval, (ie Global Warming) The most chilling part of this 45 year old report is the amount of it’s proposed contengencies that have come to fruition and that we now are living amongst.

      Probably the most troubling aspect of the whole affair is that JFK, who was very troubled with the reports suggested directions for our counrty, felt compelled to announce plans to warn/inform the public about the Iron Mountain Report in the hopes of killing the potential of it ever being implemented.

      JFK’s annoucement to warn the public came one week before his assassination.

      • Vigilant

        I think you’ll grant that his assassination a week BEFORE he intended to divulge the information would have been more effective, huh?

        Had any Elvis sightings recently?

        • Michael J.

          Vigilant,
          Read, listen and judge for yourself.

          http://reality101blog.blogspot.com/2009/08/jfk-secret-society-speech.html

          PS Yes, Elvis cuts our lawn and trims our hedges.

          • Vigilant

            I’ve listened to the speech a number of times, and it doesn’t imply anything of the kind. His first words are “The very word “secrecy” is repugnant in a free and open society.” He uses AS EXAMPLES secret societies.

            The main thrust of his speech (to the newspapers) is to laud a free society, extol the virtues of transparency in government, and to ask the media to help him get the word out about government actions without censorship.

            The “monolithic conspiracy” of which he speaks, it goes without saying, is Communism. It was so obvious to his audience that he didn’t even need to give it a name.

          • Vigilant

            And why in the world would a Kennedy, one of the names that always comes up during the NWO discussions, ever divulge the evils of a secret society of which he was supposed to be a member?

          • http://deleted Claire

            Vigilant: Perthaps he realized the impact this society would have and decided he did not want any part of it.

          • http://deleted Claire

            Vigilant: Also, maybe they did not think he would ever say the things he did in that speech.

          • Vigilant

            If that was the case, there was no mileage whatsoever in assassinating him after the fact.

          • http://deleted Claire

            Vigilant: A lot of people are murdered “after the fact.”

  • Yoppeh

    WHAT??? We did NOTHING????
    What about all those covered loads of BOMBS our company hauled out of storage on OKINAWA to waiting ships? You know the kind of bombs that make mushrooms and we said by treaty we never had on Okinawa? Truckdrivers had MP’s with shotguns standing on both doors infront of the mirrors, ordering them to look straight forward and never in the mirror or to the side as they backed into the warehouse and someone hooked up the trailers. One MP riding with them and the same game as they backed on to the ship and someone unhooked the trailers. Yes, I don’t know anything about that EXCEPT I was in that supply company on Okinawa.
    What about my former boss that that told he was in the Air Force Reserve and notified during a collage class here in the USA to report and 24 hours later was changing bomb mounts on F4”s from conventional to NUKE in Japan?
    What about the sailor that told me during the afternoon he was in the boiler room of the Enterprise off shore Vietnam which had planes over Hanoi and the Admiral called down and gave settings for the ship. They told the Admiral they could not do those as the Enterprise would not do that. His reply “It can and it will and you will obey those orders”. The next morning at daylight the Enterprise was within striking distance of Korea with its task force scattered all the way back to Vietnam trying to catch up to it.
    Did you miss that we came much closer to Nuclear War then than we did in Cuba?

  • Robert Root,

    Your story brought back memories; for some of the men were friends I knew while stationed at Yokosuka, Japan. We celebrated my birthday and their departure on Sunday evening. I stood watch at the Naval Communication Station, when the “Flash” message traffic started coming, informing the world of this “incident”.
    A heart felt salute to these men, where ever they are now.

    Bob

  • http://andythek2@hotmail.com Andy K.

    I DO REMEMBER THE PUEBLO. AT THE TIME I WAS IN THE U.S. AIR FORCE AT VANDENBERG AFB IN CALIF. WE WERE GIVEN TWO DAY NOTICE TO REPORT TO CLARK AFB PHILIPPINES, AS WAR MAY START IN KOREA AND MORE MEN WERE NEEDED FOR VIET NAM. I WAS SENT TO A “TENT CITY” IN QANG JEW AND SOME NIGHTS I COULD HERE BOMBS ALONG THE DMZ. THIS WAS INDEED HARD DUTY FOR SOMEONE IN THE USAF. IN LESS THAN TWO MONTHS I WAS SENT BACK TO VANDENBERG AFB GLAD THAT A WAR DIDN’T START. I DIDN’T HEAR TOO MUCH NEWS ABOUT THE PUEBLO EXCEPT THAT IT DID GO INTO KOREAN TERRITORY.

    • Vigilant

      If you meant “Kwangju” or “Gwangju,” you must have been drunk or high on something. The DMZ is hundreds of miles from that city.

      And there were no bombs dropped on the DMZ. Are you for real?

  • Michael J.

    Thanks to all that served our great nation and their first hand accounts of events posted here today.

  • Palmettopalflorida

    I read your article with interest since contrary to its claim that there was no U.S. Naval response, there was: At the time I was a Second Class Boatswains Mate, serving aboard the USS Mars (AFS-1), home ported in Yokosuka, Japan. On the day of the incident the Armed Forces Radio Network was announcing that the crew memebers of certain ships stationed in Yokosuka, were to return to their vessels. This included the Mars. Even though the ship was not fully manned, since many crew members had not heard the broadcasts, in short order, I seem to recall possibly two – three hours, we were underway without any indication of our destination. It was not until we were underway that the Captain announced we were heading for the waters off North Korea. I recall serveral days of tense limited maneuvering through a collection of other U.S. Navy vessels, and North Korean and SOVIET Naval vessels. Though never announced, or addressed by the Captain or Commissioned Officers, for these days the crew lived with the opinion that at any moment we would be in a fight war with either, or both, N. Korea or the U.S.S.R. Since the Mars area of operation at that time was within the waters of Viet Nam, during that War, it was simply taken for granted that we could go to war with other Communist nations. Needless to say, we were all releived when we received orders to return to Yokosuka. As a footnote, on our return voyage the Captain announced that all Officers and Crew were to be awarded the “Korean Expeditionary Medal,” for our involvedment in this incident. However, a little more than a year later when I left active Naval service and was asked to review my records before Discharge I mentioned that there seemed to be no mention of the “K.E. Medal,” in my personnel folder. I recall the clerk excusing himself to verify the issuance of the award to the crew of the Mars, and on his return he indicated there was no such record. Consequently, for these many years I have always felt it had been determended by the U.S.G. to classify this incident and our response, as “Top Secret”, and bury the knowledge of just how close we may have come to entering another war while we were conducting a war in Viet Nam.

    • Vigilant

      Palmettopalflorida,

      To the best of my knowledge there has never been a Korea Expeditionary Medal. I think you mean the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal. Every one of us who served in Korea received the medal after we had been there a certain length of time, and is/was valid for membership in the VFW.

  • Jim C.

    The ship was first harrassed on January 21st. They were ordered to stand down for boarding on January 23rd. Why didn’t Butcher have the crew bring the ammo topside during those two days? How hard is it to pull a tarpaulin off a couple machine guns? It apparently took a while for the four torpedo boats, second sub chaser, and two Mig 21 fighters to assemble in the area. Why didn’t Butcher take a go at the first sub chaser (shoot backc), while while trying to escape? Maybe they could have held the sub chaser off just long enough to escape. Why didn’t they make any attempt to smash their encryption gear?

    Either Butcher was incompetent, or we’re not being told the truth about this incident. I suspect the NSA WANTED the Pueblo to be captured, and Butcher was in on it. I suspect the crew was sacrificed.

    • Aliqsandre Suguitan

      Of course the Pueblo would not fight. If it did it would have been blown out of the water by superior fire power. They depended on the Navy to rescue them, they being in international waters. Our Navy failed them miserably. The commanders should not have consulted with Washington DC politicians, who would rather sacrifice Americans than their precious facade of peaceful intent. They should have gone in with the cavalry and rescued the defenseless Pueblo.

      What a sad and disappointing home-coming it was that met the crew. Instead of being hailed heroes for their valor, they faced a court martial. Our politicians had to keep up with the charade and put the blame on the crew.

      With weak livered moral-acrobats for politicians, can America still call itself the land of the brave?

    • independant thinker

      “Why didn’t they make any attempt to smash their encryption gear?”

      they did attempt but only had a couple of axes could not do enough damage to the hardened cases ot get to the workings of the equipment.

    • Mike

      I remember the Pueblo incident all too well. Capt. Butcher tried to have the equipment smashed with axes. When that didn’t work, they tried with a few hand grenades. When the North Koreans opened fire, Capt. Butcher get shrapnel through his bottom into his rectum. He received NO medical treatment and suffered a severe infection. I feel the other postings to this article fill in the story very well. It was, unfortunately, not handled well at several levels.

  • http://deleted Claire

    Go Packers!!!

  • http://PatriotcarePackage.com Michael Slee

    Hello Sir,

    I’m the producer of the History Channel TV program you mention in your article. Still to this day I am amazed at the number of people that have no idea about the USS Pueblo? Further more the ignorance of the World and the American people about North Koreas economy. The North Korean economy is based on the sale of illegal nuclear weapons and missile technology, Illegal drug trafficking and the counterfeiting of U.S. currency. There is nothing good or redeeming about this government. They need to start over.

    • Bradley

      Michael Slee…why not the History Channel do a program on the Pueblo, talk to my brother in law who was on the that ship and the few others that survived. They just had a reunion in California a few months ago.
      thanks

      • Vigilant

        Add to that a piece on the EC-121 that was shot down a year later with loss of 31 lives.

  • Greg

    Some of us will never forget the PUEBLO and always ask why we never did anything to help. But keep buying those Korean imports and be the good
    (mindless) American that you are. Did you read what Michael Slee wrote ?
    Koreans have been killing Americans for years. A friend of mine fired his machine gun until the barrel bent over from the heat (Korean War). He asked the Capt. where did all the Koreans come from ? The reply was that they were Communist Chinese. So once again keep buying that crap from China.
    I won’t and I’ll put it back and do with out if I have to. And let’s
    not forget the 8TH Cavalry who died in that shoot out or the Airborne at Hamburger Hill. Don’t forget any of our fallen. But have to know that the traitor LBJ who was in the group that took out JFK is in hell. Wandamurline wrote about it and you must read that also. Along with LBJ there is another traitor by the name of Clinton (MR). And here we go again. The war in the middle east is turning into another NAM that we can’t win but the cost of gas at the pump goes higher and higher every week that another American DIES. Just a thought; you won’t get a social security check when you are old and gray. They spent all the money.
    SIGNED; the father of a son at a little shoot out at Iraq ( GOD save the 101st Airborne and all their sons and daughters ).

    • Vigilant

      “But keep buying those Korean imports and be the good
      (mindless) American that you are.”

      You seem to equate ROK with the North Koreans. We don’t import goods from North Korea. Or do you think they’re all the same?

  • http://None Roger

    Each and every one of the above comments ‘should’ be “force read’ to each member of our present Congress – without any personal excuses for
    absence! Just perhaps, shame itself might give them some backbone and
    insure their actual knowledge of how betrayed the country has been. Far to much of our history is convently swept under the rugs of both houses – to say nothing about the White House. Surely shame itself would
    inspire more patriotism.

  • Curtis Stewart

    I was activated in the Air National Guard and spent a year in kunsan Korea because of it. First of all, this may have been an intentional event by our Government to do a number of things.

    At that time Japan was was wanting the US Military out of Japan.
    Many Demonstrations were taking place by the communist backed labor
    party. The second item was that the Millitary wanted the fighter
    jets of the National Guards so that can be used in Vietnam for close-air-to-ground support. There is no better way of getting rid of
    equipment that is needed thus allowing an upgrade of the equipment.
    Some said that all the National Guard was being sent to Vietnam but that rethought since were activated for this particular event.

    The Ship sailed from the USA to Japan and the sailors didn’t know what their mission was but found out through the Japanes citizens (ladies of the night) where they were headed and their mission was. They were sent there almost unarmed and unescorted. They had one quad 50 Machine gun and the Officers only had handguns.

    After the event, most all the national Guard who had F-100′s were
    activated and three Squadrons were sent to Korea, the rest went to
    Vietnam. Six air bases were greatly imporved in Korea by extending the runways and support facilities. New housing quaeters were built
    to incease the staffing at each base by at least 500%. We now have bases much closer to China than before.

    I learned a lot there on how other people live and how the military
    has played a part in our history.

    What happens is not always how it gets protrayed.

    Therefore, I’m a little sceptical about what happened and how
    we handled the whole thing. This may have been what we wanted.
    The Gulf of Tonkin was another example of an event that never really
    happened but was used to fuel the need to esculate the conflict.

    I don’t want to make you think that the Militray is our enemy. It isn’t. They do what they are instructed to do. However, the reason for why things happened is somethines hidden.

    I was under the impression that JFK didn’t have the guts to
    deal with Russia over the Cuban Missle crises. However recently
    it was learned that the Russians had planned a Surprise Nuclear
    attack on the USA which the Cuban missle build up was going to be
    used to make happen. Therefore, the Citizens of America realy
    didn’t know that Russia had planned and JFK handled it to defuse the whole event. I believe that he insured them that they would not
    last to many minutes longer than after the missle was fired at the USA. Lucky enough we had double agent within the KGB that tipped us off on their plans.

    Therefore, the real truth of Pueblo will not be known for another
    20 or 30 years.

    • Vigilant

      “an intentional event by our Government..”

      Good God, another conspiracy theorist! Get real!

    • Warren

      I know about the Cuban Missile situation very well. What was not published in the early days was that JFK traded our Thor and Jupiter missile deployments for removal of the Soviet missiles in Cuba. Hard
      hitting fact. He really did not make the Soviets back down as so elegantly published in the left wing media.

      • Vigilant

        Warren, the removal of ICBMs from Turkey was quite well known. I’ve read about it several times over the years. Nothing secret about it.

    • Harold

      The Gulf of Tonkin incident DID happen, get your facts straight, no more lies

  • jopa

    Apparently most everyone on this site would have like to have bombed or just nuked North Korea at the time.The eighty two seamen would more than likely have been killed, we would still be in North Korea as well as south or we would still be fighting the Chinese along with Iraq and Afghanistan.At the time of the incident I felt the same way as most of you but after thinking about it for a while LBJ may have been right on this one.Never been an LBJ fan or a shoot first and ask Questions later fan.It seems as though if a whole lot of people don’t die you are not happy.

    • Vigilant

      That’s the typical apologist’s load of crap we’ve come to expect from the left.

      LBJ: appeaser (Pueblo)
      Nixon: appeaser (EC-121)
      Clinton: appeaser (Carter actually believed the N. Koreans would terminate their nuclear program).

      “It seems as though if a whole lot of people don’t die you are not happy.”

      Yes, thanks to Chamberlain’s appeasement, millions of people died in WWII. You left wing idiots will NEVER admit that appeasement results in more deaths than if the problem is nipped in the bud.

    • Harold

      Maybe Iraq, but we are not finished in Afghanistan. To leave early would tell the Islamists it’s OK to attack America.

  • jopa

    Go Packers

  • jopa

    Vigilant;You appear to be the idiot in that an all out attack on North Korea would have resulted in many Americans losing their lives.If we didn’t get our men back all options were on the table.We have to quit the cowboy mentality and grow up already.

    • Vigilant

      “Vigilant;You appear to be the idiot in that an all out attack on North Korea would have resulted in many Americans losing their lives.If we didn’t get our men back all options were on the table.We have to quit the cowboy mentality and grow up already.”

      WHO the hell said anything about an all out attack? YOU are the one who makes the leftist, antiwar assumption that all who don’t agree with you are warmongers (“It seems as though if a whole lot of people don’t die you are not happy). That last statement is absolutely gratuitous and in the wrong.

      And then you distort and twist what really happened: “Never been an LBJ fan or a shoot first and ask Questions later fan.” Let me ask you, wimp, who shot first? You want to change history as well?

      Have you had ANY experience in the miltary whatsoever, or were you one of those draft card burning cowards?

    • Harold

      grow up kid and learn how to think

  • http://gunner689 gunner689

    I was in Nam at the time of the Pueblo Incident. It was towards the end of the TET Offensive and we were at the Khe Sanh firebase. When the word came down about the ship it was assumed that Marine units would be dispatched to take the ship back. That was before we realized how weak our gvt. really was. The fact that many of our POWs never came home was another case in point. In recent years I learned that approximately 50,000 Allied POWs were not repatriated from Soviet control at the end of WW11. Those men had been held in German camps which were over-run by Russian troops and held. At that time Stalin wanted all Russian citizens who had fled to the west, mostly England, Canada, and the US, returned to Soviet control where they were murdered directly or sent to the camps in Siberia. Winston Churchill wouldn’t return those people and Stalin retaliated by keeping the Allied troops as prisoners permanently, eventually sending them to Siberia to be worked to death. Many of these soldiers were Americans. Both Presidents Truman and Eisenhower were aware of this situation but stated that it was not going to war with the Soviet Union over, particularly after they got the bomb. Gen. Patton was correct in stating that we should have kicked the Soviets back to the borders while we had our troops there.
    I used to hunt deer with a man, now deceased, who was held in such a camp that the Russians took over. He and a handful of others managed to escape and make their way west to Allied lines. None of the other 600 held in the camp were ever seen again. Since that time prisoners have been kept in the Korean War and the Viet Nam War and numerous Cold War incidents. In all cases the powers that be in Washington just wrote these men off. The Pueblo crew would probably have faced the same fate if it had’t been such a large incident and covered by the world press.

  • Jhonny Bloznalis

    If there was ever was a misinformed, self-righteous whining group of crybabies…this is it. I suggest picking up a few accredited history books and actually learn about the events you’re blathering about.

    According to most of the rants here, there is no General, President or incident that could live up to the stratospheric standards of combat, diplomacy, negotiations or warfare each of you would have engaged. a sorry and sad display of Monday-morning quarterbacking.

    I really appreciate the “super-macho” comments about a Major or Colonel going to “take out Jane Fonda with a pistol if they had the chance”. Really? Jane Fonda was about 5’7″ and 130 soaking wet in 1969. It sounds pretty damn pathetic a grown man needs to threaten a waif with a pistol, doesn’t it?

    I noticed no one “super-macho’d” Ted Nugent, the “all-talker, no action diaper-boy in this conversation. You know, Ted “Mr Macho” who was going to kill hippies that were fighting in Vietnam. Funny, those “hippies went to Vietnam, while Ted didn’t bathe for a month and peed and crapped in his pants two weeks straight before checking in with the selective service officer to avoid going into the service. Now he’s “Mr tough guy. Another joke.

    Anyway, which war would you like to discuss and provide the “ah hah” moment that would have changed the entire war: you can’t. revolutionary, 1812, civil war, Spanish American, ww1, ww2, korea, Vietnam? or the numerous “incidents” or proxy wars in which we have been involved: pueblo, uss liberty, uss cole, Afghanistan, Iraq, Chad, Angola, “drug war”, and on and on an on and on….

    throwing blanket statements (regarding people and events) which you had no intimate knowledge is ignorant.
    you currently have the luxury of time in which to base your misguided opinions and observations. Most are as ignorant about this country as they are about warfare, strategy, negotiations, building, maintaining and shifting alliances, logistics, public opinion, resource allocation; oh yeah…the main one: reality.

    the day anyone sit back and say each and every decision or action you undertook in your lifetime was correct, warranted, righteous and was planned, is either a liar, hypocrite or a delusional idiot.

    btw: Obama was born in the USA, palin is an idiot, taxes are too high for most of us, the media is controlled by big business and has got you suckered into schilling for millionaire tax cuts, the government is barely efficient, private industry isn’t much better, unions are needed, nurses are needed, the government should allow tax breaks for companies who ship jobs overseas, certain people shouldn’t be allowed to have access to any/all: guns, cars, booze, drugs, children.

    be thankful and informed, not hateful and ignorant.
    JB

    • Vigilant

      “be thankful and informed, not hateful and ignorant.”

      After that sweeping ill-informed, insulting post, you can’t be serious.

    • http://! Angel Wannabe

      JB, How’s ’bout pounding sand!___History has repeated itself, because freespeech ALLOWS YOU to talk like an idiot!_That ain’t no historical fact, It’s present propaganda.

    • bob wire

      You pretty well summed up my feeling on the discussing here as well JB.

      The is brief moments in time that people either rise or fall.

      The noisy loud talkers are rarely the ones that rise to any occasions while we suffer their “commentary” as they exercise their free speech.

      I remember Nam as well, I can still smell it, feel it on my skin, I remember being 21 and doing what was expected of me. I didn’t know a lot back then, I wasn’t required to but I did know that I wasn’t driving. I knew all I needed to know to do the job asked of me.

      Life is not simple if you are very bright,~ the less bright you are, the more simple life becomes.

    • Harold

      Hanoi Jane was responsible for hundreds of American deaths, this is no waif

  • Jhonny Bloznalis

    correction…

    companies Shouldn’t receive any tax breaks for shipping USA jobs overseas.

    • http://deleted Claire

      Jhonny Bloznalis—You got this correct—-No tax breaks to companies that ship jobs overseas!!!!

  • Dr. Mabuse

    Yes Chip, I remember the USS Pueblo.
    I also remember the USS Liberty and the USS Maddox.
    Would you write a column on these incidents also?
    It would be appreciated.

    • Harold

      The Maddox, Turner Joy, Edson were all there

  • Louis Fulton

    I didn’t see mentioned that the US also paid a high ransom for the return of the sailors. Hundreds of Caterpillar bulldozers and other equipment was sent to N Korea.

    When the Korean war stopped there were thousands of American prisoners abandoned by our government who eventually died there. Some soldiers that were brainwashed and “confessed” returned and were prosecuted here as traitors. (Unlike McCain who collaborated with the Viet Cong and is a hero.) Occasionally the N Koreans sneak into the South and kidnap American soldiers. The soldiers are declared to be deserters and no effort is made to help them.

  • jopa

    Not just no tax breaks for companies that ship jobs overseas.We should first give government contracts to companies with American mailing addresses that pay taxes to America not some little carribean island as in the case of Haliburton.I know they are not the only one but they may be the biggest scammer of our tax dollars.

  • Warren

    I was in Dr. Kissinger’s Conference Room at the moment this was reported. I understand that at least one sailor was killed in the process of “hand-grenading” the crypto machines in the “secret” room. Thermite destruction devices were not yet in place because of the urgency of deploying the vessel; hence the hand grenades. Sad moment in history. My brother was deployed on the Pueblo’s sister ship.

  • chuckb

    jopa

    if it were not for the epa and environmental lobby we could have most of our companies doing business on u.s. soil. thanks to the liberals over the past thirty years or so they have made regulations so tough on these issues it’s not possible to do business in this country. check out where george soros does his business, does brazil give you a hint? thanks to people like looney tune gore and the liberal democrats.

    • http://gunner689 gunner689

      Don’t forget the Unions. There unspoken moto is more pay for less work. Along with that goes the Union mentality if entitlement.

  • jopa

    Chuck b Investing in any oversea venture is a big risk and I hope he does well.If only that tax on the top two per cent would have gone through we could use some of those tax dollars for the war effort.He does donate millions to charity and many other good causes and seems to be a nice man.

  • chuckb

    jopa

    we don’t need tax dollars for the war effort, we need to bring our troops home immediately. we are proving nothing in afghanistan or iraq except losing life and costing us dearly. i don’t know if soros is a bad man or not, i know very little about him, i do know he funds the democratic party and a lot of the subversive movements. i could care less how much money he makes or anyone else, i do care when their actions affect me. you want to tax the rich and spread the wealth, by doing this you are creating a problem for small business and causing un-employment. this is third world mentality, check out zimbabwe they really tax the rich. russia tried this type of government for 70 years and then collapsed.

  • http://deleted Claire

    Hooray for the Packers!!!! Way to go!!! I am doing the Happy Dance!!!!

    • http://gunner689 gunner689

      Go Steelers !!!!!!

      • Harold

        GO 49ers

        • http://gunner689 gunner689

          They went.

  • jopa

    Claire; Hooray Packers.The BJ Raji interception TD was Priceless.The highlight of the day.

  • jopa

    Chuckb: I do agree bring the troops home and not just fron Afghanistan and Iraq but also Japan, Germany, Korea and any place else they are not truly needed.Japan and the rest of the former anti-American countries always win in the end when we become their protector.They can use their government money to manipulate the price of goods while we protect them with our militery might at our expense.

    • http://gunner689 gunner689

      Yes and put them on our border with Mexico to stop that invasion.

  • Jerry

    Truman’s failure to prosecute the Russians at the end of WW II in addition to his failure in firing General MacArthur in the Korean War has set the precedence in Washington D.C. for politicians prosecuting wars not our military. These coward politicians have not covered the military’s back and allowed tragedies like USS PUEBLO (AGER-2) to occur. More importantly John S. McCain Jr., Admiral, USN, CINCPACFLT and Thomas H. Moorer, Admiral, USN, CNO both are responsible for what happened to PUEBLO. McCain and Moorer should have received courts martial for dereliction of duty, hazarding a vessel, cruelty and maltreatment.

    The very politicians who have pick pocketed and robbed our treasury blind are the ones who have failed America and our military. We must stop this precedence and elect conservative who are Patriots with the core values of honor, commitment and courage and who believe in our Constitutional Republic. If we do not do this ASAP, we are doomed as a nation.

    “Chinese Air Force Could Overwhelm Opponents”

    This, from David Fulghum of Aviation Week:

    “War gaming, including an extensive simulation by Rand, has shown that the U.S. would generate a 6-1 kill ratio over Chinese aircraft, but the Americans would lose. Even if every U.S. missile destroyed an opponent, there would still be enough surviving attackers to shred U.S. tankers, command and control and intelligence-gathering aircraft, says Andrew Davies, program director for operations and capabilities, Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI) in an interview with Aviation Week.”

    The reason [the U.S.] lost was because the Chinese sortie rates and persistence carried the day,” Davies says. “Any American aircraft was operating out of Guam or Okinawa because the airfields in Taiwan were taken out in the first half hour [of the conflict]. So [U.S.] time on station over the Strait is quite limited.

    Another issue is where U.S. Navy aircraft would be based. “The issue that the U.S. has is, can the aircraft carrier get close enough to the fight?” Davies says. “The Chinese have been working since the [Taiwan] Strait crises of 1995-6 to deny the approaches to China to a carrier battle group.

    One other very interesting comment jumped off the page.

    Boosters of modern airpower hold up operations in Kosovo and Iraq as examples of how successful advanced technology is. But Davies questions whether pitting a handful of modern aircraft against minor military powers is a fair test.

    “That’s an awful lot of money being spent to be able to kick around third-rate countries,” he says. “The silver-bullet platforms are fantastic . . . where a small number of them can completely overwhelm a relatively small power. ”

    But when up against China, a small, high-tech force suddenly does not look as great.

    Uh huh. Quantity having a quality all its own, apparently. Who knew? The lack of land bases affects our ability to protect our allies and interests in the Western Pacific, how we could perhaps project power ashore to establish those bases, and whether or not we will be willing to risk our smallish number of CVNs to penetrate the Chinese ASBM envelope to get at the enemy. Sound familiar? Well, it should.

    What was it Mark Twain said? “History doesn’t really repeat itself. But it sure does rhyme.

    Are those in the Congress as concerned as we are of the potential threat the PRC posses to “To Overwhelm Opponents” in their quest for Asian military dominance and possibly world military dominance? Are these same politicians aware of the ability, capability or inability of the PRC’s principal opponent to deter, counter and defeat the PRC ambition/dream should they act on their ambitions? Rest assured should or when this occurs, the PRC’s comrades to the North, East and for a short distance Northwest, will eventually combine forces with the PLA in their crusade to overwhelm opponents.

    If our leaders are aware of the threat, why has the number of U.S. Navy combatants been allowed to decline to the lowest levels since the second decade of the 20th century? Why does the Secretary of Defense believe the United States Marine Corps operates under an antiquated amphibious doctrine with a proposal to eliminate the Marine Corps amphibious force thus allowing a reduction in force of over 20,000 Marines. Ludicrous.

    What our leaders should be concerned with, for example, are programs like the F-35 that far exceeds projected cost. Unacceptable, is the 382 billion dollars for 2,443 aircraft. The 2,443 F-35′s are very much needed in our military, what is not needed, is appalling and a disgrace and unacceptable is the 382 billion dollar price tag now placing the F-35 project in jeopardy of being jettisoned because of cost overrun.

    Responsible programs management within DOD is a must and those Admirals and Generals who fail to provide responsible leadership management must be held accountable for their failure to the service they lead and to the country whom they serve. We must, for every weapons platform retired or surveyed, have a replacement that exceeds the technology of that it replaced at a more efficient overall cost. If our leaders do not do this, we stand the risk of becoming “Overwhelmed By Our Opponents”.

    Not to put to fine a point on it, but lets remember that RAND is, for all intents, a USAF mouthpiece. Since said USAF really wants a future long range bomber, naturally the scenarios and assumptions they choose tend to lead to a real need for a future long range bomber.

    A few points to remember.

    In any cross strait scenario, the Taiwanese and, presumably any US forces, will be on the defensive, conducting sea and air denial, not sea or air control. So continuous control of the air and sea around Taiwan will not be required, at least initially. Only enough to deter and or stop the Chinese. How does this change things? Well for one, you can stand off at longer ranges and use pulses of power to deny the Chinese control of the sky, which is required for a successful attack, and eradicate them. Instead of reacting to waves of Chinese fighters, which they get to time, by standing and dying when you run out of ammo like in the RAND war game, you can role them back (using waves of US fighters), and then leave until the next time. Tough on the Taiwanese, but it works.

    Second, US Submarines get to sink Chinese invasion ships in droves. While you can argue that Chinese subs may be able to avoid detection, when we are on the offense, it would be a stretch to think that we can not find and sink surface ships when we are on the defense. They have to come to us, not the other way around. Even 5 or 6 SSNs could have a field day with the Chinese Navy. Given a few weeks, we could have far more than that available.

    While being somewhat like Plan Orange (which assumed the Philippines would fall and we would have to fight across the Pacific to retake it, it is far more like the initial defense of the Philippines with a few significant differences.
    1. The ability of the Asiatic fleet is operatically better, with dramatically more effective submarines against any invasion force. Additionally, the Taiwanese Navy has significant capabilities itself in sea denial.
    2. The USAF forces are both stronger compared to the threat and have the ability to be reinforced dramatically faster (as in we can reinforce them as opposed to 1941 when we could not).
    3. We have the ability to hold at risk the nation wanting to attack. While we may not want to or plan to, the US could easily deliver multiple thousands of cruise missiles if required in a very short period of time against virtually every military facility across the entirety of the China.
    4. Taiwan has a significant retaliatory ability of their own to hold the Chinese mainland at risk through missile attack, and it appears to be increasing. Given that most cross straight scenarios assume that China will attack Taiwanese air bases with massive missile attacks, you can figure the Taiwanese will be happy to fire back.

    So not to put to fine a point on it, it does not come down solely to a force on force air fight, as much as RAND would like to think it does. Nor is it a Navy versus Navy battle, a sub versus sub battle, or whatever.

    Look at it from China’s viewpoint.

    1. Taiwan has a pretty effective military that they have to neutralize.
    2. Taiwan has an unknown retaliatory capability that they could use against China. Would they attack military targets or economic and political targets?
    3. How would a Taiwan attack play to my neighbors, such as Japan? South Korea? Russia? India? others?
    4. How can I protect myself against a economic blockade which can be imposed with ease by the US?
    5. What would be the result of attacking Guam and other US bases in the area? Would the US retaliate by attacking bases (or even key infrastructure) throughout China?
    6. Are my cool plans to deploy “assassin’s mace” weapons going to work? Can I reliably predict what the enemy will do?
    7. Am I willing to lose my Air Force and Navy to take Taiwan?
    8. What will be the effect of forcibly reintegrating Taiwan on my own population?
    9. How will my troops fight? Last time I tried in 1978 it didn’t work out real well for me.

    And I could go on. Basically, there are a lot of known unknowns and probably quiet a few unknown unknowns. We face similar challenges, but we have the advantage of being on the defensive. We only have to deter the Chinese to accept the status quo.

    The whole arguments about a possible war with China remind me of the Soviet Admiral who was asked about how easy it was to not have to worry about protecting Aircraft Carriers. He responded, and I paraphrase, “The only thing more difficult to protecting a carrier is protecting against a carrier”.

    • http://gunner689 gunner689

      And it was Bill Clinton who allowed the sale of advanced technology to Red China. But he has nice hair.

      • Jerry

        Bill Clinton, what a joke and a failed leader he is.

  • Lonnie Williams

    yeah I recall this very matter of factly BIGGEST disgrace of my time other than the Prsident that permitted those Koreans to keep her. Next to our peanut farming president Carter (the brain dead one) that permitted Iran to keep our fellas this was one of our worst. No wonder we are seeing the terriort coming here no one to stop them. WE must play nice to bad no one tells tht to our enemies

  • Dan Richardson

    Forgotten’ war winner? There wasn’t one, now…

    The Korean War has not been forgotten! Oh yes there was a winner…. Read on.

    I’m sure there are many Veterans of Korea that still have nightmares of their experiences and have
    wondered why things happened as they did.

    Perhaps you may ponder a few of these unsettling questions concerning our military: How and why did
    the U.S. lose the war in Korea? Why weren’t our POWs returned from Korea and Vietnam? Whatever
    happened to Congress’ sole right to declare war? Should U.S. troops be sent all over the world on UN
    missions? Why has the ban against homosexuals in our services been scrapped? What was the real
    purpose of George Bush’s Gulf War?

    As a young boy growing up on Lake Greenwood near Coronaca in Greenwood County, South Carolina,
    I had a Hero. He was a leader of men, an honorable soldier, a victor in time of war, He was General Douglas MacAuthur.

    Our motto should be: Duty, honor, country: Those three hallowed words reverently dictate what you ought to be, what you can be, what you will be. They are your rallying point to build courage when courage seems to fail, to regain faith when there seems to be little cause for faith, to create hope when hope becomes forlorn as quoted by Gen. Douglas MacArthur (1962)

    I questioned for years how President Truman could relieve this Honorable Commander. During the years 1967- 68 while stationed in South East Asia during the Viet Nam war I became curious of some tactics employed by our military. It was not until my assignment to HQ’s Alaskan Air Command in 1972 that I discovered facts that did not bear favorable to some of our Presidents and others in charge of our armed services. To acknowledge the truth when confronted with the different “facts” presented by our schools, newspapers, magazines and television was very diffuclt. My father, Dan “Red” Richardson, admired Gen Eisenhouser and supported his bid for president. I remember dad giving me an “I Like IKE” presidential Campaign button which I wore proudly! But, after reading “the Politician”, I began to realize history had been distorted.

    “It is natural to man to indulge in the illusions of hope. We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth, and listen to the song of that siren, till she transforms us into beasts. Is this the part of wise men, engaged in a great and arduous struggle for liberty? Are we disposed to be of the number of those who, having eyes, see not, and having ears, hear not, the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst and to provide for it.”
    Patrick Henry (1775)

    The despicable General William Tecumseh Sherman who caused the burning, raping and looting much of the south during the war of Northern Aggression is credited with saying “ War is Hell!” The goal or purpose in War is to WIN! Anyone who has ever participated in war should concur!

    The United Nations Headquartered in New York seated a Delegate from Nationalist China (Taiwan) on January 19, 1950. This was an excuse for Soviet General Vasilev, Chairman of the UN’s Military Staff Committee and several other Russian officials to storm out of their offices in protest.

    General Vasilev proceeded immediately to North Korea and began directing the military buildup of North Korea’s communists forces. A Department of Defense release dated May 15, 1954 claimed that Vasilev actually gave the order for the North Koreans to attack South Korea on June 25, 1950. Vasilev’s replacement Soviet Geneneral Ivan Skliaro and his comrades soon returned to their posts at the UN.

    The Korean War was fought under the auspices of the United Nations, like Viet Nam, the Persian Gulf and the intervention in Somalia, Bosnia, etc.

    During, what President Truman refered to as “police action” all military orders and directives sent from Washington and the Pentagon to American commanders in Korea were first supplied to several offices at UN headquarters, including those of the Military Staff Committee headed by Soviet General Skliaro before being forwarded to Korea. Traitorous

    These orders were subject to approval by these Communists persons at the UN who actually had authority to amend them. General Vasilev in North Korea received them from his Soviet comrades perhaps even sooner than did our own commanders in the field. General Lin Piao, the commander of the Red Chinese troops boasted in a leaflet distributed in China, “l would never have made the attack and risked my men and military reputation if I had not been assured that Washington would restrain General MacArthur from taking adequate retaliatory measures against my lines of supply and communication.”

    The communist forces knew what orders our troops were to follow all during the war! And they knew that, no matter what happened, U.S. and South Korean troops would have their hands tied. Traitorous!

    With a meager force and under UN oversight that he would later learn was determined to see him lose, General MacArthur assumed command of the U.S./Republic of Korea (ROK) troops, greatly outnumbered, with their backs to the sea at the southern tip of the Korean peninsula, they were facing annihilation.

    MacArthur attacked his enemy’s rear with an amphibious assault at Inchon, far up the Korean peninsula. With that one brilliant stroke, our forces severed the supply lines of the communist forces. In less than two months, the North Korean army had been defeated, driven not only out of South Korea but out of control of North Korea as well. The allied forces completely occupied North Korea, all the way up to the Manchurian border. The war had been won. Why MacArthur’s plans regarding the Inchon landing were not provided to Vasilev and his North Korean comrades remains a mystery. What is certain is that MacArthur, who did not have it within himself to refuse to follow military protocol, supplied his superiors with complete details of the invasion.

    After the war and during a Congressional investigation, General Mark Clark said: “I was not allowed to bomb the numerous bridges across the Yalu River over which the enemy constantly poured his trucks and his munitions, and his killers.” General James Van Fleet said: “My own conviction is that there must have been information to the enemy from high diplomatic authorities that we would not attack his home bases across the Yalu.” Air Force General George Stratemeyer added: “You get in war to win it. You do not get in war to stand still and lose it, and we were required to lose it. We were not permitted to win.” General MacArthur then summarized: “Such a limitation upon the utilization of available military force to repel an enemy attack has no precedent, either in our own history, or so far as I know, in the history of the world.”

    No one denied that General MacArthur had displayed unparalleled military competence. But, for the most part, the fact that he had defeated his adversary with a minimum loss of life and limb on both sides became lost in the adulation he received. General MacArthur was denied permission to destroy the bridges over the river which poured hordes of Chinese communist troops from Manchuria, and the war began again in earnest. Finding himself criminally restricted in the use of his military power by Washington. He objected, thereby giving Truman the excuse to remove him, not for disobeying orders, but for wanting to win. The Chicago Tribune stated at the time President Harry Truman wasn’t worthy to shine the general’s shoes.

    “Always in war when I visited my wounded in the hospital, I could look them in the eye, no matter what their condition or how tragic their wounds, knowing that our country had backed them to the hilt. But when I went to see my Korean wounded, I just couldn’t look them in the eye, knowing that they had been forced to fight with one hand tied behind their backs …. I am convinced I was restrained in Korea by some secret Administration policy directive or strategy about which I was not informed.” General Douglas MacArthur

    The General was correct: There was a secret arrangement about which he had never been informed. He was not alone in realizing the betrayal. Some of America’s leaders — in and out of uniform — have done their best to convert this proud profession into something unworthy of honor or praise.

    Command of the U.S./ROK forces was turned over to General Matthew Ridgway. He immediately altered the method of fighting. In his own book, The Korean War, Ridgway stated that his first task on assuming MacArthur’s command was “to place reasonable restrictions on the Eighth [U.S. Army] and ROK Armies’ advance.”

    The perverted rules of engagement Ridgway then instituted were responsible for many of the 50,000 American deaths. Then later another 58,000 Americans were killed in Vietnam, where our soldiers’ hands were again tied by similar, seemingly insane, restrictions. Secretary of State Mr. Dean Rusk and Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara are the despicable traitors who created these rules of engagement in Vietnam, and Lyman Lemnitzer, Maxwell Taylor, William Westmoreland, and Andrew Goodpaster (all CFR members) as the generals who accepted them. Traitorous!

    Ridgway’s orders to field commanders read in part: “You will direct the efforts of your forces toward inflicting maximum personnel casualties and material losses on hostile forces in Korea…Acquisition of terrain of itself is of little or no value.”

    It has been said: “Classic military strategy includes the taking and holding of terrain until so much of it has been acquired that the adversary is forced to sue for peace.” General Douglas MacArthur said: “In war, there is no substitute for victory.”

    But this was no longer allowable strategy in Korea. Even worse, our men were told that killing was to be their main goal.

    A morally sound military principle holds that removing an enemy’s capability to impose his will should be the goal — and killing him is not always necessary.

    Which is precisely what my favorite military hero, General Douglas MacArthur had demonstrated with the successful landing at Inchon.

    From the victory that had been gained after Inchon, our forces were required eventually to settle for a stalemate. A change, to abandon their traditional role as the finest moral traditions of the military, to become killers would be demanded even more in Vietnam.

    Two years of fighting was over relatively inconsequential hills (not to the troops) near the 38th parallel. Our troops would wage bitter hard-fought battles to take a particular hill, Then, after success had been achieved with plenty of casualties on both sides, orders from on high would require them to abandon what they had just won. Remember Ridgeway’s orders, “Acquisition of terrain of itself is of little or no value.” But, kill, kill, kill ! Traitorous!

    In Vietnam, We were repeatedly sent out on “search and destroy missions”; regularly pressed into fighting for a piece of terrain, won at great price, only to receive orders to abandon. The order of the day: Search and destroy.

    It was not the fault of the men in the field. The blame has to be placed at the feet of men such as President Truman, and General Ridgway, a political type whose eventual membership in the Council on Foreign Relations came as no surprise.

    Not nearly as obvious as in Korea where the display of the UN flag was prominent, the UN involvement in the Vietnam War was under authority stemming from our involvement in the UN’s South East Asia Treaty Organization (SEATO).

    On November 26, 1966 Secretary of State Dean Rusk stated, “It is this fundamental SEATO obligation that has from the outset guided our action in South Vietnam.” But earlier, on September 15, 1965, the State Department announced: “The Government of the United States has informed the UN Security Council promptly and fully of all our major activities in Vietnam.” Remember President Truman directing all orders to commanders in Korea be sent to the UN first. Traitorous.

    The communist forces knew what orders our troops were to follow all during the war! And they knew that, no matter what happened, the combined U.S. and South Korean Vietnam troops would not be allowed to triumph.

    The men in Vietnam were betrayed in other ways by their leaders. On July 23, 1966, during a speech at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, the home of one of the divisions in Vietnam, President Lyndon Johnson stated: “Our fighting men have turned the tide of battle [and as they] make a military conquest impossible for the communist forces in the field, our diplomats are probing for a way to make an honorable peace desirable to the communist leaders in Hanoi.”

    Can you believe it! Desirable to the communist leaders in Hanoi! Traitorous!

    Is that what Americans were dying for?

    The men in uniform who heard that statement must have known at that point that their comrades under arms in faraway Vietnam were not receiving the full backing of this nation’s leaders.

    Many who heard it, myself included, of course, would soon find themselves in South East Asia (SEATO). Not allowed to win.

    In the State of the Union address January 10, 1967, Mr. Johnson said there would be “more cost, more loss, more agony” in Vietnam. At the same time, he outlined a broad program of trade, credits, cultural exchanges, consular agreements, and other openings to the communist leaders in Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, and the Soviet Union. These were the nations that were supplying North Vietnam with the wherewithal to kill Americans. Traitorous!

    The Richmond (Virginia) News Leader declared in an editorial published on November 2, 1966: “Every communist bullet that tears into American flesh in Vietnam bears the brand of LBJ.”

    We were not being permitted to win. But none of us knew the rules of engagement under which they were forced to fight. In March 1985, after employing all the clout he could generate, Senator Barry Goldwater one of my favorite senators, was able to have the actual rules of engagement declassified by the Defense Department. He hurriedly placed them in the Congressional Record (March 6, 14, and 18, 1985).

    Here are some of the restrictions placed on U.S. pilots: (My Brother-in-law, USAF Col Ernest “Sonny” Hatchell F-4D Pilot included)
    • SAM missile sites could not be bombed while they were under construction, but only after they became operational.
    • Pilots were not permitted to attack a communist MiG sitting on the runway. The only time it could be attacked was after it was in the air, had been identified, and had shown hostile intentions.
    • Military truck depots located just over 200 yards from a road could not be attacked and trucks that drove off the road were safe from bombing.
    • If a South Vietnamese forward air controller was not in an aircraft, it was forbidden to bomb enemy troops during a fire fight even though the communist forces were clearly visible and were being pointed at by an officer on the ground.
    On the ground the rules (same in Korea) of engagement were: Don’t shoot until shot at; don’t chase the enemy across borders or into his privileged sanctuaries; don’t hit him where it will really hurt; and don’t win. There could hardly have been a greater betrayal of brave combat forces in all history. Traitorous!

    Top-ranking military leaders who spoke about the no-win policies forced on them during Korea began to find themselves forcibly retired. Douglas MacArthur was the first to go. During the war in Vietnam, more top-ranking military leaders who protested the restrictions placed on them were sent home. Marine General William Walt was expected by many military leaders to be named commandant of the Marine Corps. His outspokenness caused him to be passed over and retired.

    As the years have passed, political types in uniform have been promoted to the top positions in each branch of the services. Only a few years ago, the name of each member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff could be found on the rolls of the Council on Foreign Relations. Retired General Colin Powell is not the first Joints Chiefs chairman to hold membership in the CFR.

    Top brass who are purely military men have been removed and those who yield to political correctness is the reason why there are so little protest of America’s military being placed in humanitarian, nation-building, UN-promoting, and other missions which they should never have been involved.

    America’s Military personnel are still the best in the world. They exist to protect the vital interests of the United States and nothing more. They are not the Red Cross; they are not the UN’s globoalcops; they are not the Peace Corps; and they are not any President’s plaything to be used in whatever manner he wishes.

    Reclaiming the military’s sole mission of defending the United States is vitally important. Military personnel cannot do this of themselves. What they need, and what our nation needs, is a rising tide of public awareness about deep treachery at the top of our government.

    U.S. Army Major Fred A. Smith, a korean war POW, was told by the communist Chinese camp official that, “You are here to learn,” and “may take one year, ten years, or even 40 years, some of you may die here. But if you die, don’t worry. We will bury you deep so that you won’t stink.”

    Major Smith made it home, his testimony became part of the Congressional record. His words have been buried and forgotten, along with the accounts of his colleagues. The fates of his fellow prisoners of war have been sealed — not just by the communists deception, but also by our government.

    In 1953, retired Lieutenant General James A. Van Fleet, who had commanded the U.S. 8th Army in Korea (and whose son was among the POW/ MIAs), was quoted in the New York Times as saying that “a large percentage of the 8,000 American soldiers listed as missing in action are still alive.” Van Fleet was not alone in this assessment. General Mark Clark, former U.S. commander in Korea, resigned suddenly in 1953, and accused the communists of holding several thousand American servicemen after the prisoner switches was supposedly complete. General Mark Clark’s remarks did not spur action to bring our POWs home!

    Reports of Americans being held alive in North Korea from the days of the Korean War continue to surface. A report that appeared in the Bangkok-based Asia Times included an interview with a former Pyongyang secret police official, Oh Young Nam, whose father was reportedly a bodyguard to the late North Korean dictator Kim Il Sung. Oh Young Nam reported that between 1982 and 1993 he made numerous visits to a secret prison camp north of Pyongyang where elderly black and white men were housed, which was described to him by guards as a facility for U.S. prisoners from the Korean War. He said that one segregated sector was marked “USA” in Roman letters. Oh Young Nam recalled that once, during the early 1980s, he offered a beer to a black American at the camp.

    Washington has kept a tight lid on the story of abandoned POWs from the Korean and Vietnam Wars. Since Generals Van Fleet and Clark”s comments 50 years ago, nothing has changed for the better. Colonel Millard Peck, a Vietnam War hero who headed the Defense Intelligence Agency’s MIA/POW office, exposed the DIA’s “mindset to debunk” reports about living POWs in Southeast Asia. Resigning in disgust in 1991,

    “The Green Beret Colonel said that the POW effort “is being controlled and a cover-up may be in progress. The entire charade does not appear to be an honest effort, and may never have been…. that national leaders continue to address the prisoner of war and missing in action issue as the ‘highest national priority’ is a travesty.”

    The Clinton Administration gave diplomatic support, money and aid to Communist Vietnamese and the North Koreans — even though these communist regimes threaten our allies and our own troops on the Korean Peninsula and Taiwan.

    Former Congressman Robert “Bob” Dornan (R-CA), chairman of the House Subcommittee on Military Personnel declared, “This shameful institutional performance is best described as an unrelenting ‘predisposition to discredit and dismiss’ all information and reports that have merit and might lead to resolving cases of Americans known to have been alive in communist captivity and, frankly, may still be, in some seemingly God-forsaken cases.”

    Colonel Philip Corso a high-ranking, reliable soviet defector, and former top intelligence, a member of the Panmunjom truce delegation and on the National Security Council under President Eisenhower, testified of his own knowledge about how U.S. POWs were shipped from North Korea to Siberia, with their whereabouts purposely kept secret from the American public, provided details of the tortures of our prisoners at the direction of the Kremlin, including mind-altering procedures and terrible medical experiments similar to the Nazi and JAP’s during WWII. After this monstrous treatment, many of our men were executed, while others (from the Korean and Vietnam Wars) were subsequently transferred to the Soviet Union.

    Corroborating the testimony of Corso, who was personally involved with Eisenhower’s decision to hide from Americans U.S. knowledge of at least 900 Americans who were alive in enemy hands, are documents from the Eisenhower Library. Materials recently declassified at the request of the Dornan subcommittee indicate that in December 1953, four months after the August 1953 “Operation Big Switch” prisoner exchange, the Army was aware of the names of 610 persons who had “just disappeared from the camps.” Likewise, the Air Force knew of more than 300 unreturned men, leading to the belief that the Reds were holding U.S. military technicians.

    Corso pointed out that “in the past I have tried to tell Congress the fact that in 1953, 500 sick and wounded American prisoners were within ten miles of the prisoner exchange point at Panmunjom but were never exchanged.” In addition, Corso testified about reports from sources — including American POWs, intercepts from the National Security Agency, agents, defectors, Red Chinese and North Korean POWs, Nationalist Chinese, and others — that American POWs were sent to Siberia.
    “My intelligence,” said Corso, “centered around three train loads of 450 POWs each. Two of these trainloads were confirmed over and over, the third was not as certain. Therefore, the final figure was, ‘confirmed 900, and 1,200 possibly.’ These were the figures that I discovered with President Eisenhower while I was a member of his NSC.” Continued Corso: “The bulk of the sightings were at Manchu-li, on the border of Manchuria and the USSR. Here the rail gauge changed and the U.S. POWs had to be transferred across a platform to a waiting train going into the Soviet Union.”
    In short, Corso concluded, “the prisoners were sold down the river.” No doubt about that. Just as the former security official says, “We abandoned them.” Traitorous!

    The colonel was also assigned to the Operations Coordinating Board of the White House, National Security Council, where he handled virtually all projects on U.S. POWs. “Here I found that U.S. policy forbade that we win in Korea.” He even cited the specific directives for the “no win” policy, further elaborating that “we called this the ‘fig leaf policy.’”

    Testifying before the Dornan committee, former General Major Jan Sejna, member of the Czech Central Committee, the Parliament and Presidium, and the Party Group that gave orders to the latter two; whom many experts consider the most important communist official to seek asylum (1968). According to prominent defense analyst Dr. Joseph Douglass (who extensively debriefed Sejna and has worked with him on POW matters) and former DIA director Lieutenant General James A. Clapper Jr. has vouched for Sejna’s reliability.

    Seina testified that “we received directions from Moscow to build a military hospital in North Korea. The advertised purpose of the hospital was to treat military casualties. But this was only a cover, a deception. The top secret purl and biological warfare agents and to test the effects of atomic radiation, The Soviets also used the American GIs to test the physiological and psychological endurance of American soldiers. They were also used to test various mind-control drugs. Czechoslovakia also built a crematorium in North Korea to dispose of the bodies and parts after the experiments were concluded. Between 1961 and 1968, when I left Czechoslovakia, I would estimate at least 200 American POWs were shipped to the Soviet Union through Czechoslovakia.”

    Commander William “Chip” Beck stated that the testimony of General Sejna, “that transfers took place, not only in Korea, but [also in] Vietnam, has been supported in conversations with other reliable defectors.”

    These Soviet covert-operation secrets are being guarded even today by Russia, Vietnam, Laos, Red China, the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia, and even Cuba. Why? In a statement for the record, Beck gave the following:
    • First, because POW operations remain among the most sensitive of Soviet-orchestrated operations, perhaps even higher than their nuclear secrets.
    • Second, because “communism is not ‘dead.’ As its doctrine decrees, it is only underground. Of vital importance to the POW/MIA questions, there were no purges in the communist intelligence services in the former Soviet Union [FSU]. Documents and records, as General Sejna points out, were transferred from Eastern Europe to Moscow. Those who ran the KGB still run the SVR, and a dozen other services in Russia and the FSU.”
    • Third, it remains “difficult, but not impossible, for communist veterans who participated in these programs, and may know the fate of our POWs, to come forward. Their lives, families, and well-being are still at risk. As one former KGB officer told me, ‘journalists and businessmen are being killed in Moscow and St. Petersburg for trying to break secrets far less sensitive than the POWs.’”

    More galling, however, is that covering up these atrocities has long been a conscious act of the U.S. government. Even Senator John McCain (R-AZ), a former POW from the Vietnam War, continues (as he did during Senate hearings several years ago) to try to undermine revelations damaging to the Reds and to those protecting them. Why?

    British traitor George Blake, a POW 1950, was recruited to spy for the communists, then found guilty of being a Soviet agent in 1961. Former KGB London resident (head of station) Oleg Gordievsky noted in KGB: The Inside Story (HarperCollins, 1990) that the MGB, his agency’s progenitor, was “given unrestricted access to Western POWs held by the Chinese and North Koreans,” including Blake.

    Red Chinese mind-twisting, is described in Edward Hunter’s 1956 the Brainwashing.

    Moscow and Peking weren’t alone in the use of coercive human experimentation. The Nazis were infamous practitioners, as were the imperialist Japanese. Japan’s Army Unit 731 killed thousands of POWs, but most practitioners went unpunished so the Allies could share their knowledge of germ warfare. For more details — such as POWs being subjected to blood poisoning, lethal X-rays, electrocution, dehydration, boiling, freezing, enhanced air pressure until eyeballs burst, horse-blood transfusions, exposure to cholera, typhoid, anthrax, etc. — see, for instance, Gavan Daws’ Prisoners of the Japanese (Morrow, 1994).

    The first step in the misuse of our military was the passage of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) in 1949, sold by the Truman Administration under the phony cover of a mutual alliance to contain the communist menace. A creature of the In United Nations and subservient to it, NATO was set up as a path to regional merger, now being realized as NATO prepares to include Central and Eastern Europe and the former states of the Soviet Union as members. To begin the process, Truman was armed with an unprecedented and unconstitutional authority to dispatch troops to NATO.

    One year later Communist North Korea invaded the South and the UN Security Council called for members to intervene. What authority did Truman cite for his move? If he could send troops to NATO, he said, he could send them to Korea!

    Truman, was the first President to trash the US Constitution (only Congress can declare war) honoring the “superior” claims of the United Nations Security Council. He arrogantly called this first of America’s undeclared wars a “police action.” Traitorous!

    Abraham Lincoln said: Kings had always been involving and impoverishing their people in wars, pretending … that the good of the people was the object. This, our (Constitutional) Convention understood to be the most oppressive of all Kingly oppressions; and they resolved so to frame the Constitution that no one man should hold the power of bringing the oppression upon us.”

    Acting like kings, is exactly what Presidents Truman, Johnson, Nixon, Bush, Clinton and Bush have done through the backdoor route of the UN Charter, a document written and signed into being with the help of Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) Insiders for this very purpose. Congress let them do it acquiescing to illegal presidential military interventions in Korea, Vietnam, Panama, the Persian Gulf, Somalia, Haiti, and the Balkans. Our leaders including the US Senate and House of Representatives have transferred much of our nation’s jurisdiction in war to the United Nations, compromising our national sovereignty. Traitorous!

    Please Publish in the Opinion page,

    Thanks,

    Dan Richardson
    Greenwood, SC 29649

    • Jerry

      Mr. Richardson, it will take Patriots such as you to return our country to greatness by sweeping all the Washington D.C. political trash out the door and voting in people who truly love our country and have only one goal in mind and that is to serve the people and America with honor, integrity, ethics, courage and commitment. The days of the D.C. political industrial complex machine raping and stealing from Americans must end.

    • http://gunner689 gunner689

      Dan: thank you for writing such a revealing and informative article.
      Why do you think so many Presidents from FDR to present have played footsie with our enemies, even in time of war. My uncle was killed in Korea in 1952 on some unknown hill. I barely survived 2 tours in Nam and my son has been serving in the Middle East since 9/11. You think you’re doing the right thing when you sign up and go to war but then you learn that your greatest enemies are home-grown.
      Thanks again.

      Semper Fie

  • James

    I would remind all that every nation has the right to defend itself. If a foreign spy-ship is cruising in U.S. territorial waters, we have every right to detain or destroy it. When our intelligence gathering ship, USS Liberty, was monitoring Israel in the 60s, and Israeli dive-bombers killed over a hundred of our men and nearly sunk her, we did nothing.

  • jopa

    James; Be careful what you say.Saying Israeli’s divebombed and killed Americans could get you deported.

    • James

      Jopa, I was merely relating an historical fact. When war vessels enter another country’s territorial waters, they usually provoke an attack. In WW I, before we were in it, we were using the cruise ship Lusitania to supply our future allies. Germany placed a notice in the New York Times, advising passengers not to board her because they intended to sink the ship, which they did.

      • http://gunner689 gunner689

        Too bad we missed that Chinese sub that launched that missle off the coast of Ca. a few weeks ago. Suppose they were trying to tell us something ? Maybe that guidence system equip. Clinton sold them in the 90′s works; thanks Bill. Is your debt to them paid off or do they still own you ?

        • James

          Gunner689, Interessting, I always assumed it was a missile but never heard any details. How do you know it was a Chinese sub?

        • James

          Gunner689, W-e-l-l-l?

          • http://gunner689 gunner689

            Process of elimination. Who else would it be; especially when we were having conferences with them ? Put the dots together.

          • James

            It could have been Japan, knowing that we would think it was China, and lessen our trade relations with them.

  • Asad

    I enjoyed and was informed by your well-written article about the Pueblo. I would certainly like to see you apply the same skill as you write about the USS Liberty. I’m sure your son will be equally shocked and concerned.

  • http://www.personelliberty.com RichP

    I had arrived in the Republic of Korea (South Korea) just a few days after its capture, January 28,1968, courtesy of the U.S. Army. The whole country was on “red alert.” A couple of days later I was assigned to the 7th Infantry Division at Camp Hovey, near Camp Casey and close to the DMZ. In April my Battalion was rotated to the DMZ, north of the Imjin River. Sometime during that summer over my jeep radio we heard Commander Bucher’s “confession speach”. The radio was our communication radio and the North Koreans had tapped into our frequency. Bucher had butchered his English so badly that we knew he did not mean what he was saying. Later that year, after we had rotated back to Camp Hovey, just before Christmas, we heard over Armed Forces Radio the Pueblo crew being released over the bridge at Panmunjom. On the Korean DMZ 1968 was one of the highest years of infiltrations and “incidents” as in ambushes of our patrols within the zone. Staff Sergeant Joseph A. Bass and Sergeant Jon Holmdahl, Both from A Co., 1st Bn., 32nd Inf. Regt., 7th Inf. Div. were killed in different incidents that summer. RIP. Also, to reply to Vigilant regarding his reply to Andy K. re: “no bombs in DMZ”. Our artillary units south of the Imjin River would conduct H & I (harrassament and intervention) fire into the zone. We were in a night ambush position and would hear a boom to the south then hear what sounded like a freight train go overhead then an explosion just north of our postion. Just glad they didn’t drop one short.

    • Vigilant

      Thanks, RichP, I wasn’t aware of the H&I fire.

      My earlier comment about Kwangju is correct. It’s hundreds of miles from the DMZ, so he could not possibly have heard it.

  • jopa

    Gunner689 That Clinton was a genius. I notice when the missle was launched it was last seen heading towards China.Tottally brilliant.This is as good as the worm that infected Iran’s nuclear development program that set them back years.

  • Mac

    One of the most shameful moments ever for our country. LLoyd Bucher and his crew must have suffered greatly and felt completely abandoned. And to think, to this day the North Koreans are still toying with us. Why, because we want to keep peace with China. This country at times has lost its B___S as a result of wishey washey politicians.My father gave his life at Iwo Jima and I served in Viet Nam. Why?

  • jopa

    James: Gunner689 and I were just having a little fun with our comments.Don’t take everything so seriously all the time.There is a lot of fiction on this site that tries to create friction.

    • http://gunner689 gunner689

      Thanks Jopa, but I was dead serious.

      • James

        Gunner689, Me too! The TV news said the vapor trail was from a jet aircraft. I said Phooey! We all know what a missile smoke trail looks like, and that’s what everybody saw. We’ll see a big one this April, Mark Kelly (Rep. Gabbie Giffords’ husband) will command his last shuttle mission then.

  • http://Www.MI40Reviews.org/ Vivian

    Hey! Do you know if they make any plugins to protect against hackers?
    I’m kinda paranoid about losing everything I’ve worked hard
    on. Any recommendations?

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