Congress Dodges Government Shutdown By Approving Two-Week Spending Bill

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Congress dodges government shutdown by approving two-week spending billFederal lawmakers have averted a government shutdown, at least for another two weeks.

President Barack Obama signed a continuing budget on March 2 after the Senate approved the measure 91-9. The House approved the bill, which cuts $4 billion from current spending levels, on March 1. Legislators passed the two-week extension budget to avoid a government shutdown over the weekend.

According to CNN, Senate Democrats sought a month-long extension because a series of short-term funding bills may contribute to a climate of economic uncertainty. Lawmakers now have until March 14 to approve a budget for fiscal year 2011, which ends on Sept. 30. Since Oct. 1 of last year, the government has been operating on 2010 spending levels.

The Republican-led House has already approved a 2011 budget that would cut $61 billion for the remainder of the year and approximately $100 billion from Obama's proposal. While Democrats have claimed that the GOP's plan would hinder economic growth, some members of the Tea Party said that more needs to be cut.

Judson Phillips, the founder of Tea Party Nation, recently wrote on the group's website that Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-Ohio) "looks like a fool" by relenting on the GOP's promise to cut $100 billion. Phillips called on the Tea Party to defeat Boehner in a Republican primary next year.

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