Company Makes Surveillance-Proof Technology Accessible To All

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Young adult using a smart phone

The wireless, always-on society that has become the norm in the 21st century offers boundless convenience in how we communicate, learn and store new information. The convenience of mobile technology also opens users up to privacy threats from government, criminals or any number of people with malicious intent. One company is working to help mobile technology users retain the convenience of instant communication while remaining confident that their privacy will not be breached.

The start-up tech firm Silent Circle introduced a surveillance-proof smartphone app in October that made making secure phone calls and text messages from a smartphone easy enough for the everyday user. The company also promised that the encryption software included no backdoors for snooping government agencies emboldened by Patriot Act-era wireless surveillance permissions.

The company offers a privacy service for both Android- and Apple-based smartphones, beginning at just $20 a month, that includes protection for calls, texts, email and video on the smartphone.

On the Silent Phone website, the company explains how the service works:

Each user will receive a special Private Encrypted 10-digit phone number individual to them. Silent Phone allows you to easily integrate existing contacts and favorite information on your device to provide complete functionality securely. We built Silent Phone and our network to be true Device-to-Device encrypted security –no one can listen in, no one can wiretap , no one but you and the subscriber on the other end has access –not us, not anyone. Everyone wants to know “How did you do it?” –how is it possible that Silent Phone can make clear crisp Video & Voice calls over 3G 4G or any other older network –100% encrypted with almost no latency? Our custom-built PBXs, servers, software and algorithms were built and designed by our All-Star team of “who’s who” in the world of VoIP, Encryption and Secure Software.

Because the encryption is peer to peer, not even Silent Circle holds a key to the information sent over the network. Users can also set messages to self-destruct after they are received. The company also recently expanded its capabilities so that users can securely send emails and documents securely without the fear of interception.

Sam Rolley

Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After covering community news and politics, Rolley took a position at Personal Liberty Media Group where could better hone his focus on his true passions: national politics and liberty issues. In his daily columns and reports, Rolley works to help readers understand which lies are perpetuated by the mainstream media and to stay on top of issues ignored by more conventional media outlets.