Common Core Presents: Democrat Math

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With the promise of Federal dollars and the assurance that the new standards are simply tools to ensure that all children know certain things by certain grade levels, 45 States and the District of Columbia are taking the necessary steps to Common Core compliance.

As a result, many American parents are now learning that the “children belong to all of us” sentiment of supporters of the new education standards is clearly present in every aspect of Common Core. And by “all of us,” those supporters mean government and anyone who supports its growth in power.

“Few oppose standards, but a significant number oppose the Common Core State Standards. Those on the political right don’t like the fact that–notwithstanding the word ‘State’ in the title–it was really the feds who helped to railroad the standards into place,” Marion Brady, a retired teacher and author, wrote in a Washington Post column last month.

In creating coursework for the Common Core program, the Feds who “helped to railroad the standards into place” spared no opportunity to politicize lessons to their benefit.

For instance, the Daily Caller reported that a lesson entitled “How Could That Happen?” focuses on the 2000 Presidential election, asking middle school instructors to “engage students in a class discussion about whether or not they feel the results of” the election were “‘fair.’”

A companion lesson, called “A Swath of Red,” asks teachers to discuss the Electoral College as it relates to the 2000 Presidential contest.

From the lesson: “The election of 2000 was politically charged, so you should be prepared to address the issue. The merits of the electoral college [sic] are called into question during each presidential election, and some people have strong opinions.”

Both lessons are provided as part of math classes.

Among the resources for the aforementioned politically charged math lessons, Common Core’s designers offer three websites for information about American Presidents. The recommended page is a Presidential information website proved by Infoplease, which contains a few revisionist gems.

Here’s part of Ronald Reagan’s biography as provided by the website:

Over strenuous congressional opposition, Reagan pushed through his “supply side” economic program to stimulate production and control inflation through tax cuts and sharp reductions in government spending. However, in 1982, as the economy declined into the worst recession in 40 years, the president’s popularity slipped and support for supply-side economics faded.

And, though there has been some question about his beliefs, the site takes a bit of historical license in listing President Abraham Lincoln’s religion as “liberal.”

Common Core also seeks to include conversations about “social justice” in mathematics lessons.

“Educators increasingly recognize the important role that mathematics teaching plays in helping students to understand and overcome social injustice and inequality,” Common Core-involved National Council of Teachers of Mathematics states on its website.

Sam Rolley

Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After covering community news and politics, Rolley took a position at Personal Liberty Media Group where could better hone his focus on his true passions: national politics and liberty issues. In his daily columns and reports, Rolley works to help readers understand which lies are perpetuated by the mainstream media and to stay on top of issues ignored by more conventional media outlets.