Colorado Democrats Turn Backs On Homegrown Industry, 2nd Amendment With Gun Proposal

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The mindless trudge toward neutering the Wild West — and the rest of the Nation with it — slogs on this month in Colorado, a State where recent, highly publicized moments of cultural failings that involved firearms has swept from public consciousness the deeper history of civil gun ownership the State has long enjoyed.

If Democrats in the State Legislature aren’t careful, they’ll do more than hobble residents’ 2nd Amendment powers. They may send a good corporate citizen packing (its bags).

Magpul, an Erie-based maker of high-capacity magazines, will be compelled to move its operations out of Colorado if Democrat-sponsored House Bill 1224 passes in this year’s State legislative session. The bill aims to outlaw licensed gun owners from keeping or using ammunition magazines that hold 15 or more rounds — something that’s always been perfectly legal.

Started in 1999 — yes, the same year as Columbine — by a former Marine Corps sergeant, Magpul’s corporate leadership is unequivocal about how the company would respond if the bill goes through.

“We will leave if it passes,” COO Doug Smith said in a Denver Post article last week.

“If we’re able to stay in Colorado and manufacture a product, but law-abiding citizens of the state were unable to purchase the product, customers around the state and the nation would boycott us for remaining here.”

The irony of legislation that essentially makes a firearm accessory illegal for citizens but perfectly fine for government agencies is profound. It edges Colorado closer to one of the very conditions most abhorrent to Constitutional framers: taking the powers of defense out of the hands of individuals, while enriching the state’s power to do, with more capable weapons, as it sees fit.

Colorado wouldn’t be the first State to succeed in eroding citizens’ rights in such a fashion. But the dominoes are falling. The Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, the quixotic lobbying group, lauds California, Hawaii, Massachusetts and New Mexico for having banned magazines that hold more than 10 rounds; New Jersey’s ban — like the proposed Colorado legislation — limits the capacity to 15 rounds.

Personal Liberty

Ben Bullard

Reconciling the concept of individual sovereignty with conscientious participation in the modern American political process is a continuing preoccupation for staff writer Ben Bullard. A former community newspaper writer, Bullard has closely observed the manner in which well-meaning small-town politicians and policy makers often accept, unthinkingly, their increasingly marginal role in shaping the quality of their own lives, as well as those of the people whom they serve. He argues that American public policy is plagued by inscrutable and corrupt motives on a national scale, a fundamental problem which individuals, families and communities must strive to solve. This, he argues, can be achieved only as Americans rediscover the principal role each citizen plays in enriching the welfare of our Republic.

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