Cato To Track Bad Cops

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The Cato Institute has launched an initiative focused on keeping an eye on incidents of misconduct by police throughout the United States.

Cato’s National Police Misconduct Reporting Project grew out of the police abuse news feed, Injustice Everywhere, which founder and researcher David Packman shut down in April because he could no longer devote time to the project.

The project is now being headed up by Cato Director of the Project on Criminal Justice Tim Lynch, a leading voice in support of the Bill of Rights and civil liberties. His research interests include the war on terrorism, over-criminalization, the drug war, the militarization of police tactics and gun control. He has also served on the National Committee to Prevent Wrongful Executions.

Lynch writes: “The purpose of the project is to gather news reports about police misconduct in America in a fair and unbiased way. Our objective is to study the scope of the problem and to identify policies that can minimize misconduct.”

According to the site, police misconduct is not regularly examined in the United States and — in light of recent highly publicized examples — it is time to take a closer look at the problem.

The site also gives visitors the ability to report police misconduct if their stories are “supported by third-party witnesses or other compelling evidence.”

Sam Rolley

Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After covering community news and politics, Rolley took a position at Personal Liberty Media Group where could better hone his focus on his true passions: national politics and liberty issues. In his daily columns and reports, Rolley works to help readers understand which lies are perpetuated by the mainstream media and to stay on top of issues ignored by more conventional media outlets.

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