Calcium, Irritability and Convulsions

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Convulsions in infants and small children occur when plasma calcium (ionic form, calcium lactate) is decreased by 50 percent. Evidence is irritability and twitching, leading to convulsions and a trip to the emergency room where a sedating drug is given—instead of ionizable calcium which is required to correct the condition.

Growing children need calcium lactate constantly to offset the excess phosphoric acid in cereal foods in order to promote bone building and muscle function. Low calcium bicarbonate in children results in excessive nervous energy—the type of child that cannot sit still. Acute deficiency of calcium bicarbonate results in fever and convulsions.

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Bob Livingston

founder of Personal Liberty Digest™, is an ultra-conservative American author and editor of The Bob Livingston Letter™, in circulation since 1969. Bob has devoted much of his life to research and the quest for truth on a variety of subjects. Bob specializes in health issues such as nutritional supplements and alternatives to drugs, as well as issues of privacy (both personal and financial), asset protection and the preservation of freedom.

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