Britain Asks WWII Code Breakers For Help

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CHELTENHAM, England (UPI) — British code breakers are appealing to their retired colleagues for help translating a World War II message found on a dead pigeon wedged in a chimney.

The Government Communications Headquarter in Cheltenham, England, said the pigeon and its accompanying message were found this year when a Bletchingley, England, homeowner ripped out a fireplace. Code breakers have been unable to decipher the message, which is believed to have been dispatched by Allied forces from Nazi-occupied France during the D-Day invasions June 6, 1944, The Daily Telegraph reported Friday.

The GCHQ is appealing to retired code breakers from the agency’s predecessor, Bletchley Park, for help.

“We know in other contexts that there are still quite a lot of people alive who worked in communication centers during the war,” said a GCHQ historian identified only as Tony for security reasons. “It would be very interesting if people did have any information if they could put it in the pot and we could see if we can get any further with it.”

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