PETA Wants To Advertise In School Lunchrooms

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals has its sights set on young people, hoping the next generation will quit eating meat. PETA wants to advertise on school lunchroom trays, starting in Cleveland.

The ad is a cartoon sketch of a chicken with the words “I am not a nugget” and “Go vegan.”

Ashley Palmer, a spokesperson for PETA, hopes that the message will cause students to be more compassionate toward animals.

“Vegan food is really healthy and considering the amount of artery-clogging cholesterol that’s in meat and dairy and egg products, vegan choices are a great option for schools,” Palmer said.

Cleveland Metropolitan School District Communications Officer Rosann Canfora said they will consider whether the advertising “is a legitimate revenue source worthy of further investigation.”

The idea has been met with mixed reviews from parents.

Parent Shari Litton told FOX 8 Cleveland that she thinks the idea is “great” and “wonderful.”

But other parents disagree.

“There’s a lot of meat eaters out there,” parent Deshon Conel said.

City In Kansas Overturns Ban, Allows Open Carry

Five years ago, a city in Kansas decided to ban the open carrying of guns. On Monday, that decision was reversed.

Overland Park’s City Council decided to allow citizens to walk the streets with guns in full view. The ban was overturned with an 11-1 vote.

Citizens can open carry with a few caveats: The weapon has to be holstered, the safety has to be on and citizens cannot carry guns into city-owned buildings.

Some citizens support the ban being overturned, while others think the decision is not wise.

“As a matter of respect to the right of a person to own a gun and carrying, clearly, I do support that,” said Michelle Dunham of Overland Park. “But as a person would be walking next to people carrying guns out, yeah, that’s more concerning to me.”

Business owner Sheila Weiford thinks the new open carry law is outdated.

“We don’t need someone walking around toting a gun. That’s not what we’re all about. It’s not the Dodge City days,” she said.

Mom Sues After Being Arrested For Allowing Kids To Play Outside

In July 2011, a Texas mom spent the night in jail after a neighbor called and told police that children were playing outside unsupervised. Tammy Cooper was arrested on child endangerment charges. Now, she’s suing her neighbor Shelley Fuller, the arresting officer and the La Porte Police Department.

Cooper’s children, age 6 and 9, were playing outside when a neighbor called 911 and claimed the children had been abandoned. When police arrived, Cooper told them she had been sitting outside the entire time. Nonetheless, she spent 18 hours in jail.

Cooper, who says she routinely allows her children to play outside while she keeps on an eye on them from inside the house, was handcuffed in front of her children.

“The incident also led to an investigation by Child Protective Services, requiring Cooper to take her children to the CPS office in Houston,” reads the complaint. “Her children were separated from her and interrogated by child abuse investigators. CPS found no cause for concern regarding the well being of Cooper’s children and dropped the investigation.”

Florida School System Expected To Vote On Paddling

A school system in Florida might decide to bring back paddling. Though seldom used, corporal punishment is legal in schools in 19 States, including Florida.

New school board member and former principle Carol Ely is an advocate of corporal punishment. When she takes her seat on the board, the old standard of discipline will be revisited.

Ely was the principal of Shady Hill Elementary in Ocala, Fla., for 14 years. She says that, in her experience, paddling is far more effective than other methods of discipline, such as suspension.

“The return rate of children for corporal punishment has been almost zero,” she said.

Some parents are in favor of the idea, such as Linda McClean: “I would let them get a spanking and when they get home they would get another one for disrespecting school.”

But others disagree with the practice.

“No one should ever hit my kid. It should never be allowed,” said parent Jerrilyn Taylor.

Ely will pursue making corporal punishment an option when she joins the board next month.

How To Rid Your Food Of Nutrients In One Minute Or Less

Convenience comes with a price. That’s definitely the case with microwaves. If you’re thinking of zapping your veggies, you may want to think again.

A study published in Bioeclectromagnetics in 2008 found that cooking asparagus in the microwave reduces the vitamins available.

In 2001, a study was published in the Journal of Nutrition which suggested that heating garlic in the microwave for one minute inactivates alliinase, an enzyme in garlic that fights cancer.

In 2003, an article in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture showed that microwaving broccoli can remove as much as 97 percent of its antioxidants.

Microwaving may seem like the quickest and best option when preparing food. Although it may be the quickest, it is by no means the best. Not only do you lose essential nutrients when you choose to microwave your food, it also affects the taste and texture.

Instead of microwaving, try steaming.

School Lunch Regulations Create Black Market, Hunger, Wasted Food

Some entrepreneurial students in Massachusetts are using the restrictions on school lunches as a way to make a little extra money. A black market for chocolate syrup is forming. The sugary substance sells for 50 cents a squeeze.

On Aug. 1, chocolate milk became a thing of the past for students at Greater New Bedford Vocational-Technical High School. But that hasn’t stopped students from making their own.

“Of course they got rid of dessert, (but) flavored milk … I don’t understand why we can’t have that,” student Paige Lame told the Standard Times.

The rules also reduce the amount of protein students can have while increasing their servings of fruits and vegetables.

Students are largely not in favor of the new rules. Massachusetts introduced new lunchroom guidelines this year, as have many schools across the Nation.

“You’re paying more for less,” said student Erik Cortez of New Bedford. “I get it, but why should they have the right to tell you what you can and can’t eat?”

If students don’t eat the lunch, then the program is of no benefit, a fact that the Federal government seems to have overlooked. More students are bringing their lunch or just throwing away what they are given in the cafeteria.

“Last year, my son didn’t bring lunch. This year, he’s bringing lunch because he’s hungry,” said a parent of a New Bedford student.

In Wisconsin, students have taken to YouTube to protest.

 

 

Florida School District Hopes To Celebrate LGBT History Month

A school district in south Florida is expected to celebrate Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual and Transgender History Month. During LGBT History Month, a different “icon” is recognized every day.

Tomorrow, Broward County School Board members are expected to approve a decision to support LGBT History Month. Kindergarteners and seniors alike will be introduced to new role models.

Started in 1994 by Rodney Wilson, a high school history teacher in Missouri, LGBT History Month takes place every October and has been well received in California and Philadelphia.

“Administrators, teachers, staff, parents and students are encouraged to take part in LGBT History Month in any way that is most positive and uplifting to their schools and communities,” states the Broward County school board’s proposed resolution. “And to coordinate efforts to highlight exemplary role models from the LGBT community.”

Michael Rajner, a former member of the Broward school system’s Diversity Committee, said: “It gives youth a role model to look up to. And to realize that they themselves are a wonderful human being, and can be a productive, important member of our society.”

Some believe that if schools would support LGBT History Month, it would help put an end to bullying.

Eliana Mor, a 17-year-old female who says she has been picked on for wearing boy’s clothing, supports the decision.

“Coming from middle school and being bullied for so long, for so many years and seeing how everything has come full circle, it’s just great to see,” she said. “I knew by age 10, yeah, I liked boys, but I liked girls, too.”

NYC Schools Give Out Morning-After Pill

The New York City Department of Education is supplying morning-after pills to students. It has become a practice in at least 13 schools.

Making the practice even more controversial is that parents are not notified when the school nurse gives girls emergency contraceptives. Girls as young as 14 are given pills when they ask for them.

The birth control is supplied by CATCH (Connecting Adolescents To Comprehensive Health). Health Department doctors write prescriptions that enable school nurses to give out the drug. This fall, students can receive birth-control injections every three months.

A student must simply inform a school nurse that she has had unprotected sex. If the girl passes a pregnancy test, she can be given the pill.

Last year in five schools, 567 students received Plan B tablets and 580 students were given Reclipsen, according to the New York Post.

Parents are able to sign a form stating that their daughter cannot be given contraceptives. But according to the Department of Education, only 1-2 percent of parents have opted out.

New Jersey Bans ‘Big’ Smiles

If you go to get your driver’s license in New Jersey, put on your sad face. The State has banned “big” smiles, saying they interfere with facial-recognition technology.

The policy has been in effect all year, but it has not been talked about much. That is, until Velvet McNeil spoke to the Philadelphia Inquirer.

She told the newspaper that she stormed out when she was told not to smile, but not given a reason.

“Your picture means a lot,” she said. “It’s who you are.”

But the smile police are a little lenient. Raymond Martinez, commission of the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission, says a “neutral smile” is OK.

Elyse Coffey, a spokesperson for the Motor Vehicle Commion, said that a slight smile is acceptable, but people should not smile as if they won a lottery.

“The digital photos allow us to conduct a facial recognition scrub, which allows us to check the photos of our 19 million faces to make sure each driver has only one driving record and you are who you say you are,” Coffey said. “We’re asking customers not to make exaggerated facial expressions.”

Group Attacks University Of Tennessee For Praying Before Game

Praying before a game is a tradition in many football programs. But the University of Tennessee recently re-evaluated the process after a group complained.

The Freedom From Religion Foundation wrote a letter to Chancellor Jimmy Cheek, urging the school to stop the ritual. The letter cites surveys, court cases and even the Sermon on the Mount in an attempt to convince Cheek that praying before a game is unConstitutional.

Earlier in the year, the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga started having a moment of silence before games, instead of a prayer. The FFRF wanted the University of Tennessee to volunteer to do the same.

Annie Laurie Gaylor, co-president of the foundation and author of the letter, said: “This is a public university, not a Christian club. It’s open to all comers and should be welcoming. When you’re not religious or are of another faith and you get prayed at during events, it’s really very grating. It’s a sock in the gut for you to go for a sporting event and then be told to conform to someone else’s religion.”

Presently, Tennessee officials have no intention of changing the ritual.