Shiftiness And Doublespeak

Some random observations from Monday night’s Tea Party GOP debate in Tampa, Fla.:

  • Michele Bachmann said she would bring a copy of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution with her to the White House. Apparently, her version of the Constitution omits the 4th Amendment. How else to explain her votes to renew the misnamed and unAmerican USA Patriot Act? Doublespeak!
  • Rick Perry fumbled on his response to Bachmann’s attacks on the Gardasil vaccine and crony capitalism. He is vulnerable there. He’s also vulnerable on his stance on illegal immigration. His views on those subjects are anathema to Tea Party voters. He said he was offended that Bachmann would suggest he could be bought for a $5,000 campaign contribution. Actually, it takes more. Like $30,000 in the case of Merck. Shiftiness!
  • Mitt Romney said Social Security isn’t a Ponzi scheme and that it’s wrong to scare seniors by using the word. Either Romney doesn’t understand how Social Security works (which I doubt), he doesn’t know what a Ponzi scheme is (which I doubt) or he’s lying because he fears facing the truth about Social Security, which is broke and is government-sponsored theft. Doublespeak!
  • Ron Paul drew boos when he told the truth: that al-Qaida said it attacked the United States because the U.S. had troops stationed in Saudi Arabia, which the Muslims consider holy ground. Tea Party people are still not ready to face the fact that U.S. militarism, bombing and nation-building is not winning friends in the Mideast.
  • Newt Gingrich would be polling higher if he weren’t Newt Gingrich. Shiftiness!
  • Herman Cain said he believed the Federal Reserve should be audited. That’s a complete flip-flop from his earlier position. Shiftiness!
  • Perry and Gingrich also say they want the Federal Reserve audited. It’s a political ploy for them. Shiftiness!
  • Jon Huntsman told an immigrant from Afghanistan that the U.S. needs to remove its troops from that country. He told the truth.
  • Rick Santorum called Perry’s executive order requiring girls be injected with Gardasil “big government run amok.” He should know it when he sees it. He continued to defend the Medicare prescription drug program he voted for under President George W. Bush, saying the waste needs to be cut. Doublespeak!
  • If Ron Paul is unelectable, why are so many of the candidates echoing his positions? Shiftiness and doublespeak on their part!

And here’s a little tidbit for those who continue to insist that Ron Paul is unelectable. In a CNN/ORC poll of likely voters conducted Sept. 9-11, Ron Paul placed third with 13 percent. That’s behind Perry’s 32 percent and Romney’s 21 percent, but Paul is up 7 percent since the last CNN/ORC poll conducted Aug. 24-25.

Clearly, Paul’s performance in the debates — even though he is receiving fewer questions than Perry and Romney — is behind this surge.

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And natural healthcare practitioners also use propolis for a variety of other medical issues including ulcers, inflammations and minor burns. Some folks even believe that this bee product can help boost your immune system and lessen your chance of cataracts.

 

 

 

Jon Huntsman

Education: B.A. in international politics from University of Pennsylvania.

Professional: Executive the Huntsman Corporation and the Huntsman Cancer Foundation and CEO of the Huntsman Family Holdings Company.

Family: Married with seven children.

Political: White House staff assistant under President Ronald Reagan, deputy assistant Secretary of Commerce for trade development and U.S. Ambassador to Singapore under President George H.W. Bush, Deputy United States trade representative under George W. Bush, U.S. Ambassador to China under President Barack Obama. Governor of Utah 2005-2009.

Age: 51

State of residence: He owns a home in Washington, D.C., but remains registered to vote in Utah, where he hasn’t lived in more than two years.

Campaign website: http://www.jon2012.com/

Huntsman was extremely popular as Governor of Utah, with his approval ratings hitting 90 percent at several points in his Administration, which was noted for its tax reform agenda. Those tax reforms included $110 million in income tax cuts, and a statewide flat income tax rate. His reforms slashed sales and food taxes and provided tax credits aimed at attracting new business development. The Cato Institute ranked Utah top in the nation for tax policy after Huntsman’s reforms kicked in.

He is staunchly pro-life, and may be the most accomplished executive of the pro-life cause, according to Michael Brendan Dougherty of The American Conservative.

“He signed bills banning second-trimester abortions, reclassifying third-trimester abortions as a third-degree felony, and requiring abortion providers to explain the pain unborn children can experience during abortion. He signed a trigger law that would ban abortion outright if Roe is overturned. He opposes embryonic stem-cell research. And by establishing a state legal fund to defend these laws, he showed willingness to uphold state prerogatives,” Dougherty writes.

He also eased restrictions on gun ownership by abolishing some concealed-carry restrictions and signed a bill that would grant small-game hunting licenses to children under 12.

But some of his other stances are anything but conservative, and he seems to be attempting to cast himself as a moderate.

He supports gay civil unions and, as Governor, supported cap and trade as a way of reducing so-called “greenhouse” emissions. He also claims to believe in evolution, yet says it’s part of God’s plan. “Call me crazy,” he said. OK, consider it done.

He has praised President Richard Nixon’s creation of the Environmental Protection Agency, and he supports amnesty for illegal aliens and the DREAM Act. He opposes border fences and opposed the efforts of Utah legislators to overturn State laws that allow illegal aliens to pay in-state tuition. Essentially, his stance on illegal immigration mirrors that of his former boss, Obama.

He calls himself a Republican, but then so does John McCain, and we know how that has turned out. In fact, Huntsman is trying the McCain campaign model, I guess because it worked so well the last time. He’s hired most of McCain’s former staff to conduct his campaign. He even vowed early on to take the “high road” and not be critical of his opponents, à la McCain style.

If the adage that you can tell who a man is by the company he keeps is true, then the fact that he’s surrounded himself with McCainites should tell you all you need to know about him.

He is also Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid’s (D-Nev.) favorite Mormon in the GOP race. That endorsement, coupled with his service as Obama’s Ambassador to China and the praise he has uttered for Obama as “a remarkable leader,” probably doomed his candidacy.

As his campaign has failed to gain traction, Huntsman has gone more on the offensive, criticizing Perry’s choice of words on Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke and mocking Bachmann over her promise to bring gas prices back below $2 per gallon. “But, like a light switch being flipped, his behavior over the next 24 hours suggested that being on the offensive doesn’t come entirely natural to him. On Monday, back to sounding genial and inclusive, he told CNN that he would be willing to serve as Bachmann’s running mate if she won the nomination,” according to an article in The Washington Post.

Huntsman has said he believes mankind is responsible for climate change. “I’m not a meteorologist,” Huntsman told Time magazine. “All I know is 90 percent of the scientists say climate change is occurring. If 90 percent of the oncological community said something was causing cancer we’d listen to them. I respect science and the professionals behind the science so I tend to think it’s better left to the science community – though we can debate what that means for the energy and transportation sectors.”

However, in an interview with Fox News in June, Huntsman seemed to be trying to back away from his past support of cap and trade.

So who is Jon Huntsman? It’s really tough to say.

Rick Santorum

Education: B.A. from Pennsylvania State University, MBA from University of Pittsburg, J.D. from Dickinson School of Law.

Professional: Lawyer with the firm of Kirkpatrick & Lockhart.

Family: Married with seven children.

Political: U.S. House of Representatives 1991-1995. U.S. Senate 1995-2007.

Age: 53

State of residence: Pennsylvania

Campaign website: http://www.ricksantorum.com/

Talking to POLITICO in a pre-debate interview last Wednesday, Santorum said he has a consistent record of conservatism. He’s never been a Democrat, even when it would have been easier, and he never was for things while running for office in a liberal State that he’s no longer for now that he’s running for a national seat.

Santorum must have a poor memory. Unfortunately for him, not all of us do.

In 2004, Santorum joined George W. Bush and did all he could to help liberal incumbent RINO Senator Arlen Specter defeat up-and-coming challenger Pat Toomey. Santorum, who claims to be pro-life, backed a pro-choice Senator that was in line to chair the Judiciary Committee, which has jurisdiction over abortion law.

It’s natural for a Senator to help the sitting Senator of his State with re-election if they are from the same party. But Santorum didn’t just endorse him. He went to mat for him, cutting television ads, hosting fundraisers and jetting around the State to save Specter’s bacon. Specter beat Toomey by a mere 17,000 votes, then repaid Bush and Santorum by skipping a Bush campaign event with Vice President Dick Cheney. His supporters even went so far as to put out yard signs with the words “Kerry/Specter.” Then Specter became a Democrat.

Specter’s switch gave Obama 60 Senate votes: enough to cram Obamacare down our throats. So, in effect, Santorum is as responsible for the passage of Obamacare as Obama himself.

Santorum is no small-government Republican either. He championed No Child Left Behind and joined Bush in pushing through a new entitlement, the Medicare prescription drug bill. As Jack Hunter of The American Conservative writes, Santorum represents everything that is wrong with the Republican Party today.

“As grassroots conservatives are now rediscovering and again embracing the limited government philosophy of [Barry] Goldwater and [Ronald] Reagan via the Tea Party, Santorum’s Jurassic Park GOP comes across as more out of step than ever,” Hunter writes. “As a pre-emptive 2012 political strike, Santorum now laughably describes himself as being ‘Tea Party before there was a Tea Party.’ RedState.com’s Ben Domenech has zero tolerance for such revisionist history: ‘Does Rick Santorum have any clue what the Tea Party movement stands for? Is he being purposefully obtuse here? Doesn’t he realize that the big government solutions he advocated for in his book are exactly the reason so many Tea Partiers today don’t call themselves Republicans anymore?’”

He’s certainly no Constitutionalist, as this rant from the Ames Straw Poll debate shows. He believes it’s the Federal government’s job to legislate morality.

On foreign policy, Santorum is keen on the Middle East wars and nation building. In the August Iowa debate, he and Ron Paul argued over America’s policy toward Iran.

On Iran, Santorum said, the country was “under a mullahcracy that tramples the rights of women, tramples the rights of gays,” and other groups.

As TPM says, “This was an interesting position for a candidate who has denounced gay rights activists for using the courts to create a ‘super-right’ to ‘sexual liberty,’” which he has said trumps the religious freedoms of conservative Christians such as himself.

Santorum is a clown. He’s a big-government guy living in a world looking for a smaller, less-intrusive government. And he’s doing it while claiming the moral high ground as he lies his way along.

Mitt Romney

Education: B.A. from Brigham Young University, MBA, J.D. from Harvard University. He also attended Stanford University for one year, leaving for 30 months in France on a Mormon missionary journey.

Professional: Management consultant at Boston Consulting Group, executive at Bain & Company, co-founder Bain Capital, President and CEO 2002 Salt Lake City Olympic Games Organizing Committee.

Family: Married with five children.

Political: Ran unsuccessfully for Senate in 1994. Ran unsuccessfully for Republican Presidential nomination in 2000. Governor of Massachusetts 2003-2007.

Age: 64

State of residence: Has homes in Massachusetts, New Hampshire and California.

Campaign website: http://www.mittromney.com/landing/focus-on-jobs

By a whopping margin, GOP insiders prefer Romney over Perry and believe he has a better chance of defeating Obama. The problem is, most conservative rank-and-file members of the party don’t seem to agree. And Republican insiders don’t have a great track record of picking a winner (See Gerald Ford, Bob Dole and John McCain).

His signature accomplishment as Governor of Massachusetts is the State’s healthcare plan (called Romneycare by former Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty), which mandates that everyone participate. By most accounts, it’s a failed plan. It’s also the plan on which Obamacare was modeled. With polls showing that more than 51 percent of Americans still oppose Obamacare, that accomplishment may be the one that dooms his campaign.

The thought of Romney as the GOP’s nominee have many on the right—Tea Party members in particular—wondering what they may do in the general election. It’s possible that he is so unpalatable to Tea Party activists that the movement could consider backing a third-party candidate instead of supporting him in the general election, according to an article in POLITICO.

“If the Republican Party nominates an establishment Republican who’s wrong on health care, who’s wrong on cap-and-trade and our core issues, tea partiers could stay home or they could go third party,” said Matt Kibbe, president of FreedomWorks.

FreedomWorks is so opposed to Romney that the organization plans to mobilize Tea Party voters against Romney in States holding Presidential primaries after New Hampshire’s. Another Tea Party group, Western Representation PAC, hopes to mount a $500,000 Stop Romney Campaign that will focus on New Hampshire and include radio and television ads and get-out-the-vote efforts, according to POLITICO.

Beyond Romneycare, Romney’s past statements that he believes man’s activity causes the Earth’s temperature to rise is also troubling. He supported a form of cap and trade legislation as governor, but now says he does not support cap and trade legislation and is crawfishing as he’s attempted to explain it away.

“Do I think the world’s getting hotter? Yeah, I don’t know that but I think that it is. I don’t know if it’s mostly caused by humans. What I’m not willing to do is spend trillions of dollars on something I don’t know the answer to,” Romney said.

Backtracking seems to come naturally to Romney, who has flopped like a fish on issues like abortion, gun rights and mandates, depending on where he’s running for office.

Romney is trying to cast himself as a political outsider, but he probably would be an insider had he been successful when he challenged Senator Ted Kennedy in 1994. That race may come back to haunt him — perhaps in the primary but certainly in the general election should he become the GOP’s nominee.

It seems the Kennedy campaign created a powerful ad that pointed out Romney’s firm, Bain Capital, and its responsibility in mass layoffs at companies it bought. It also points out a $10 million Federal bailout the company received. Actually, according to POLITICO, the story is a little more complicated. Nevertheless, Bain saw several million dollars in loans forgiven by the FDIC, which had taken over Bain’s failed creditor, the Bank of New England.

Romney opposes cuts to the military budget. He wants to modernize forces, weapons systems and equipment and grow the number of troops. He also wants to establish a robust missile defense, upgrade America’s nuclear arsenal and enhance America’s “soft power,” which is code for pushing around small nations around the globe.

Michele Bachmann

Education: Bachelor’s degree from Winona State University, J.D. from O.W. Coburn School of Law at Oral Roberts University, L.L.M. in Tax Law from William & Mary.

Professional: She and her husband own a mental health practice and partial interest in a family farm. She worked as a Federal tax litigation attorney for the IRS from 1988-1993.

Family: Married with five children. She claims to have also cared for 23 foster children.

Political: Minnesota Senator 2001-2007, U.S. House of Representatives 2007-present.

Age: 55

State of residence: Minnesota

Campaign website: http://www.michelebachmann.com/

Bachmann claims the Tea Party mantle and is the founder of the Tea Party Caucus in the House of Representatives. But while she was prominent at Capitol Hill Tea Party gatherings protesting the Obamacare vote and stimulus spending bills, some things in Bachmann’s background and some of her votes indicate she is not the conservative she tries to portray.

First of all, there is the troubling fact that her family’s farm has received $295,332 in Federal subsidies since 1995. Bachmann claimed income from the farm on her financial disclosure forms, but says her family did not profit from it. It was included on disclosure forms, Bachmann said, because her husband is a trustee. To be fair, the farm was registered in the name of her father-in-law until his death in 2009. The farm has not requested a subsidy since then. The Bachmann campaign told Bloomberg that the Bachmanns did not receive direct financial benefit from the farm subsidies.

That is the same claim Bachmann makes about the family’s mental health clinic, which received a $30,000 Federal grant for employee training.

Not directly benefiting has not stopped Bachmann from trying to get more money from the government. Despite criticizing Obama’s stimulus program as “fantasy economics,” Bachman petitioned the Federal government for direct financial aid or help on at least 16 separate occasions. Much of that money came from stimulus programs she opposed and has suggested she would eliminate.

One of Bachmann’s most grievous acts — if you cherish liberty — was to vote to reauthorize the USA Patriot Act. She is also an interventionist on foreign policy, believing the United States should continue to prosecute the “War on Terror” in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq and Yemen, and should intervene in Iran’s quest to acquire nuclear weapons. At the GOP debate in Iowa in August, Bachmann said: “I sit on the House Select Committee on Intelligence. I can’t reveal classified information, but I can say this: As President of the United States, I will do everything to make sure that Iran does not become a nuclear power.”

One foreign policy feather she can put in her cap: She voted for a resolution in June that would have required President Barack Obama end U.S. participation in the NATO mission in Libya within 15 days. The resolution failed. But in light of the above statement, one has to wonder if she was just playing politics with her vote.

Bachmann refused to sign a pledge to cut, cap and balance the Federal budget, much to the chagrin of Senator Jim DeMint (R-S.C.). But she did sign a values pledge created by the conservative Christian group The FAMiLY LEADER. By signing the pledge, Bachmann “vowed” to commit herself to 14 specific points to “uphold the institution of marriage as only between one man and one woman.” One of the points calls for banning “all forms” of pornography. She gave no explanation of how she proposed to get that one accomplished in light of that ever-pesky 1st Amendment.

From 1988 to 1992, Bachmann worked for the St. Paul, Minn., office of the Internal Revenue Service’s district counsel. While there she worked on hundreds of civil and criminal cases, according to her own Congressional website, in an effort to extort more money out of citizens and corporations for the government. She declined to answer questions posed by The Wall Street Journal about her time at IRS. In public comments she has made, she has said that she went to work at the IRS “because the first rule of war is to know your enemy.” So are we to believe her four years there were part of some grand plan?

She’s also prone to making dumb statements while ad-libbing. She has claimed, “the founders that wrote those documents worked tirelessly until slavery was no more in the United States.” She also said Americans fear the Soviet Union; told a New Hampshire crowd that “You’re the state where the shot was heard round the world at Lexington and Concord”; said there was an interesting coincidence that the swine flu broke out in the 1970s while Democrat Jimmy Carter was President and again when Democrat Barack Obama was President (even though the first outbreak came during Gerald Ford’s Presidency); and she wished Elvis Presley a happy birthday on Aug. 16 — which happened to be the anniversary of his death, not his birth.

Herman Cain

Education: Bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Morehouse College, M.S. degree in computer science from Purdue University.

Professional: He was a (civilian employee) mathematician for the U.S. Navy; business analyst for the Coca-Cola Co.; executive at Pillsbury’s Burger King Division Chairman and CEO of Godfather’s Pizza; CEO and president of Digital Restaurant Solutions; CEO, president and later chairman of the board of the National Restaurant Association; member of the board of directors for numerous corporations; founder of T.H.E. New Voice Inc.; member of the board of directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City 1992-1996 (and chairman 1995-1996); radio talk show host; and Baptist minister.

Family: Married with two children.

Political: While with the National Restaurant Association, lobbied against the 1993-1994 Clinton healthcare plan. Served as senior economic adviser to the Dole/Kemp Presidential campaign in 1996. Ran unsuccessfully for the Republican Presidential nomination in 2000 and the U.S. Senate in Georgia in 2004.

Age: 65

State of residence: Georgia

Campaign website: http://www.hermancain.com/h

While Cain’s tough-sounding talk and performances in debates have garnered him some attention, he continues to lag in most polls. Maybe that’s because smart conservatives recognize a RINO when they see one.

Cain has tremendous executive experience. And his rags-to-riches story is inspiring. After all, he grew up in Atlanta during the 1950s and 1960s. His father worked three low-paying jobs and his mother was a “domestic worker.” He fulfilled his parents’ dreams of graduating from college and making a better life for himself at a time of great discrimination. But he has taken positions on bailouts that should make him anathema to people who believe in a smaller, less-intrusive government.

In October 2008, Cain wrote a column in which he praised the idea of bailing out the banks through the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) because, “Owning a part of the major banks in America is not a bad thing. We could make a profit while solving a problem.”

He also mocked those opposing the bailouts — in other words, those who consider themselves Tea Party members — as “free market purists” and called them economic illiterates. He wrote, “Earth to taxpayers! Owning stocks in banks is not nationalization of the banking industry. It’s trying to solve a problem.” If that’s not an insult directed specifically at Tea Partiers, I don’t know what is. Then he turns around and claims the mantle of Tea Party candidate. In 2011, Cain doubled-down on his support of TARP saying, “I don’t have any regrets.”

It’s really not surprising that he would support having the Federal Reserve printing money to bail out his bankster friends. After all, he spent four years as part of the inflation-creating, wealth-sapping Federal Reserve cabal. So it’s also not surprising that he opposes auditing the Federal Reserve. He really doesn’t want Americans learning about the insidious nature of the Fed’s contributions to banksters around the globe, all to the detriment of the people he’s begging votes from.

Cain has long been a supporter of the Fair Tax, a reform that would supposedly replace the entire tax code with a national sales tax. It would also turn every business in America into a tax collector, is regressive and would not fix the problems in Washington, D.C., but would merely make it easier for the government to raise taxes.

But rather than campaign on his past Fair Tax stand, Cain’s campaign platform says he supports tax cuts and elimination of the death tax and he opposes tax credits “with some exceptions.” He recently revealed a new 9-9-9 tax plan that is a version of a flat tax.

If you’re a member of the “anybody but Mitt Romney” crowd, Cain is not your man either. In 2008, Cain endorsed Romney for President — the same Romney who authored Romneycare in Massachusetts but is now running from it, and has flip-flopped on issues like abortion, Federal mandates, gun control and bailouts.

Cain has another problem: his mouth. He’s been known to shoot it off without knowing what he’s talking about, as in the time he quoted what he claimed “was a section in the Constitution” that was actually from the Declaration of Independence. And when he gets called on his missteps, he likes to call the reporters who quoted him “idiots.” He’s also not averse to dropping the “R” word when it suits him. He claims Jon Stewart was a racist for mocking Cain’s pledge that no bills passed under his Presidency will be longer than three pages.

Desperately Seeking A Statesman

Labor Day is traditionally considered the beginning of election season, so I thought now would be a good time to present an analysis of the announced candidates — at least those with something of a shot at winning the nomination.

The election doesn’t actually begin until the Iowa caucus on Jan. 3. But with debates already under way, people are beginning to pay attention. So I want to present this information on the Republican Presidential candidates early, before people lock in on a favorite candidate without first vetting him or her.

Hasty decisions cause the voter to turn a blind eye toward the flaws that exist and disregard the possibility of a reasonable discussion of those flaws. There are lots of flaws if you are looking to elect someone who will change the destructive course we are on. But I would hearken back to my recent columns, Prima Facie and Don’t Jump The Gun, and encourage you to peel back the layers and ignore the superficial when selecting your candidate.

It’s been very troubling to hear and read the comments from people who, after seeing a particular candidate give a speech performance or issue a series of pre-planned talking points, then state: “That’s my guy (or gal).”

I will tell you going in that if you are a Republican ideologue you will probably not be happy with this analysis. Already, in the few instances I have written something critical of one or more of the candidates, I have received warnings from the party apparatchik to back off. And it’s not unusual to get angry messages from readers with the sign-off, “I’m unsubscribing.”

People seem to believe it is my job to “promote” Republicans because the mainstream media will be going after the Republican candidates hard enough. It’s important, they say, that we elect a Republican because any Republican has to be better than the White House’s current occupant.

To which I say, “Poppycock.” Frankly, promoting Republicans is not my desire, nor is it my job. I have often written that Republicans and Democrats in Washington are two sides of the same coin. The party faithful is interested in one thing: power. Nothing has changed for almost 100 years, except the label of the White House occupier.

Let me remind you that I am neither Republican nor Democrat. I have no party affiliation, and I look upon the parties and their ideologues with equal disdain. I am looking for candidates who adhere to the Constitution — through their deeds, not their words. I’m looking for a true statesman. We haven’t had one leading this country for a long time.

While these profiles aren’t exhaustive, I believe they will provide sufficient information to serve as a starting point for a proper vetting of each of the GOP Presidential hopefuls. Read them with an open mind.

Also, rather than creating one long, all-encompassing story on all of the candidates, I decided to break each candidate out with his or her own separate page. So you will see a short summary about a candidate with a link to take you to the candidate’s page for more details. These pages will be updated from time to time as needed through the election.

Michele Bachmann

Bachmann claims the Tea Party mantle and is the founder of the Tea Party Caucus in the House of Representatives. But while she was prominent at Capitol Hill Tea Party gatherings protesting the Obamacare vote and stimulus spending bills, some things in Bachmann’s background and some of her votes indicate she is not the conservative she tries to portray.

First of all, there is the troubling fact that her family’s farm has received $295,332 in Federal subsidies since 1995. Bachmann claimed income from the farm on her financial disclosure forms, but says her family did not profit from it. It was included on disclosure forms, Bachmann said, because her husband is a trustee. To be fair, the farm was registered in the name of her father-in-law until his death in 2009. The farm has not requested a subsidy since then. The Bachmann campaign told Bloomberg that the Bachmanns did not receive direct financial benefit from the farm subsidies.

More

Herman Cain

While Cain’s tough-sounding talk and performances in debates have garnered him some attention, he continues to lag in most polls. Maybe that’s because smart conservatives recognize a RINO when they see one.

Cain has tremendous executive experience. And his rags-to-riches story is inspiring. After all, he grew up in Atlanta during the 1950s and 1960s. His father worked three low-paying jobs and his mother was a “domestic worker.” He fulfilled his parents’ dreams of graduating from college and making a better life for himself at a time of great discrimination. But he has taken positions on bailouts that should make him anathema to people who believe in a smaller, less-intrusive government.

More

Newt Gingrich

With Gingrich polling around 4 percent and trailing everyone in the field except Rick Santorum and Jon Huntsman, providing information on Gingrich -seems almost a waste of time. But since there’s always the possibility that he could appear as someone’s Vice Presidential candidate, the information needs to get out.

It’s actually difficult to pin down exactly who he is, because it seems to be that Gingrich is whoever he needs to be at the time. That he is a brilliant yet undisciplined man, there is no doubt. Yet, like Democratic Senator John Kerry, Gingrich is for things before he’s against them, including his wives.

More

Jon Huntsman

Huntsman was extremely popular as Governor of Utah, with his approval ratings hitting 90 percent at several points in his administration, which was noted for its tax reform agenda. Those tax reforms included $110 million in income-tax cuts, and a statewide flat income tax rate. His reforms slashed sales and food taxes and provided tax credits aimed at attracting new business development. The Cato Institute ranked Utah top in the nation for tax policy after Huntsman’s reforms kicked in.

He is staunchly pro-life, and may be the most accomplished executive of the pro-life cause, according to Michael Brendan Dougherty of The American Conservative.

More

Ron Paul

Either Paul is the smartest man in the room that is the GOP field or he’s a prophet. It has to be one or the other, because only Paul was warning in the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and 2000s and three years ago that were we headed right smack dab into the middle of where we now find ourselves.

And certainly, the Johnny-come-latelys to the battle for a sound money policy and an end to the Federal Reserve — Rick Perry, Michele Bachmann and Newt Gingrich — can’t say they’ve advocated against the Federal Reserve for longer than a month or two. For them, it’s a matter of expediency and a political ploy. For Paul, it’s a matter of conviction.

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Rick Perry

If you look up the definition of crony capitalist, you’re sure to find Rick Perry’s photograph. He is a master at political patronage and the practice has pumped millions of dollars into his campaign coffers.

Just a few examples:

  • From January 2001 to February 2010, Perry as Governor tapped 3,995 appointees 5,662 times to serve on hundreds of State agencies, boards and commissions. And during that time, his campaign received $17.1 million from 921 of these appointees or their spouses.
  • After he appointed Wendy Lee Gramm to the Texas A&M board of regents and the Texas Tax Reform Commission, Perry’s campaign received $610,000 from the U.S. Senate campaign of Gramm’s husband, Phil.

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Mitt Romney

By a whopping margin, GOP insiders prefer Romney over Perry and believe he has a better chance of defeating Obama. The problem is, most conservative rank-and-file members of the party don’t seem to agree.

Romney’s signature accomplishment as Governor of Massachusetts is the State’s healthcare plan (called Romneycare by former Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty), which mandates that everyone participate. By most accounts, it’s a failed plan. It’s also the plan on which Obamacare was modeled. With polls showing that more than 51 percent of Americans still oppose Obamacare, that accomplishment may be the one that dooms his campaign.

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Rick Santorum

Talking to POLITICO in a pre-debate interview last Wednesday, Santorum said he has a consistent record of conservatism. He’s never been a Democrat, even when it would have been easier, and he never was for things while running for office in a liberal State that he’s no longer for now that he’s running for a national seat.

Santorum must have a poor memory. Unfortunately for him, not all of us do.

In 2004, Santorum joined George W. Bush and did all he could to help liberal incumbent RINO Senator Arlen Specter defeat up-and-coming challenger Pat Toomey. Santorum, who claims to be pro-life, backed a pro-choice Senator that was in line to chair the Judiciary Committee, which has jurisdiction over abortion law.

More

Rick Perry

Education: B.S. from Texas A&M

Military: USAF pilot 1972-1977, reaching the rank of captain.

Professional: Cotton farmer on family-owned farm.

Family: Married with two children.

Political: Texas House of Representatives 1985-1991, Texas Commissioner of Agriculture 1991-1999, Lieutenant Governor 1999-2000, Governor 2000 to present.

Age: 61

State of residence: Texas

Campaign website: http://www.rickperry.org

If you look up the definition of crony capitalist, you’re sure to find Rick Perry’s photograph. He is a master at political patronage, and the practice has pumped millions of dollars into his campaign coffers.

Just a few examples:

  • From January 2001 to February 2010, Perry as Governor tapped 3,995 appointees 5,662 times to serve on hundreds of State agencies, boards and commissions. And during that time, his campaign received $17.1 million from 921 of these appointees or their spouses.
  • After he appointed Wendy Lee Gramm to the Texas A&M board of regents and the Texas Tax Reform Commission, Perry’s campaign received $610,000 from the U.S. Senate campaign of Gramm’s husband, Phil.
  • Two other appointees gave Perry more than $450,000 each and both were appointed to the Parks and Wildlife Commission. Appointees from this commission contributed more than $2 million to his campaign — an average of $118,477 per appointee.
  • No.  2 on his list of contributors were Texas A&M Regents. Four appointees besides Gramm gave more than $200,000 each, and the average per appointee was $113,127.
  • Inaugural Committee appointees gave Perry an average of $102,194 each.
  • University of Texas regents gave Perry an average of $83,463 each.

Perry likes to pass himself off as a conservative and is courting the Tea Party vote. So far, it seems to be working. But that has to be because they don’t yet know who the real Rick Perry is and see only the façade built by a slick politician. His stances on most issues are far from conservative.

However, he comes by his liberalism naturally. His father was a Democrat, and so was Rick when he entered politics in 1985. In 1988 he supported Al Gore’s Presidential bid. Now, he’s trying to run away from Gore’s global warming lunacy, saying in an interview that “this was Al Gore before invented the Internet and got to be Mr. Global warming.” In fact, Gore was already on the global warming crusade.

According to Jim Tucker of American Free Press, Perry is the Bilderberg group’s ace in the hole if its first candidate in the GOP field, Mitt Romney, fails. Perry attended the Bilderberg confab in Istanbul, Turkey in 2007. He certainly follows the Bilderberg line on issues like the NAFTA Superhighway and related infrastructure projects that open up the chances of a North American Union that would merge the U.S. with Mexico and Canada.

When questioned by the press in 2007 about his trip to the Bilderberg conference, Perry insisted the Bilderbergers do good work and Americans should be grateful for them.

Perry is soft on illegal immigration. He has consistently supported allowing illegal aliens to pay in-state tuition at State colleges and universities, and he opposed Arizona’s immigration law SB 1070. Last year, Perry spoke out against using E-Verify to prevent illegal aliens from getting jobs as State employees. Those are not Tea Party values, nor are they conservative values.

He has railed against government borrowing in Washington but more than doubled borrowing during his tenure as Texas Governor. According to PolitiFact, “Texas had $34.08 billion in outstanding bonds and notes” at the end of the 2009 fiscal year, up from $13.7 billion at the end of fiscal 2001, Perry’s first as Governor. He almost doubled State spending in 10 years, and has repeatedly raised taxes, despite claims to the contrary.

He brags about job growth, but those 1.2 million jobs he claims to have created in 10 years are 629,000 short of the jobs needed to bring the State’s employment level back to where it was in 2007. Most of the jobs were minimum wage jobs. More than half a million Texans now work for $7.25 an hour or less, so he can brag that he’s brought Texans down into a tie with Mississippi for the highest percentage of workers reduced to poverty pay.

Finally, there is Perry’s 2007 executive order that mandated girls receive the Gardasil vaccine before entering the sixth grade. The vaccine causes serious side effects and has been linked to more than 8,000 adverse reactions and multiple deaths. Most troubling of all, Perry ignored evidence of Gardasil’s dangers, possibly to receive a $6,000 campaign contribution from Merck and because his former chief of staff was the company’s lobbyist.

Perry has been called George W. Bush without the brains. Eight years of big-government spending and nation building from the “compassionate conservative” helped lead us over the cliff we now find ourselves hanging from. We certainly can’t afford four years of a dumber Bush clone known in Austin, Texas as Governor Goodhair.