Colorado Democrats Turn Backs On Homegrown Industry, 2nd Amendment With Gun Proposal

The mindless trudge toward neutering the Wild West — and the rest of the Nation with it — slogs on this month in Colorado, a State where recent, highly publicized moments of cultural failings that involved firearms has swept from public consciousness the deeper history of civil gun ownership the State has long enjoyed.

If Democrats in the State Legislature aren’t careful, they’ll do more than hobble residents’ 2nd Amendment powers. They may send a good corporate citizen packing (its bags).

Magpul, an Erie-based maker of high-capacity magazines, will be compelled to move its operations out of Colorado if Democrat-sponsored House Bill 1224 passes in this year’s State legislative session. The bill aims to outlaw licensed gun owners from keeping or using ammunition magazines that hold 15 or more rounds — something that’s always been perfectly legal.

Started in 1999 — yes, the same year as Columbine — by a former Marine Corps sergeant, Magpul’s corporate leadership is unequivocal about how the company would respond if the bill goes through.

“We will leave if it passes,” COO Doug Smith said in a Denver Post article last week.

“If we’re able to stay in Colorado and manufacture a product, but law-abiding citizens of the state were unable to purchase the product, customers around the state and the nation would boycott us for remaining here.”

The irony of legislation that essentially makes a firearm accessory illegal for citizens but perfectly fine for government agencies is profound. It edges Colorado closer to one of the very conditions most abhorrent to Constitutional framers: taking the powers of defense out of the hands of individuals, while enriching the state’s power to do, with more capable weapons, as it sees fit.

Colorado wouldn’t be the first State to succeed in eroding citizens’ rights in such a fashion. But the dominoes are falling. The Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, the quixotic lobbying group, lauds California, Hawaii, Massachusetts and New Mexico for having banned magazines that hold more than 10 rounds; New Jersey’s ban — like the proposed Colorado legislation — limits the capacity to 15 rounds.

Bill Would Ban Smoking While Driving With Youngsters

If the road to Hell is paved with good intentions, the southbound cars may have Connecticut plates — and their occupants may be wearing nicotine patches.

Well, that’s not an entirely fair generalization to make about motorists in the Constitution State. But if they’re parents who smoke, they may soon be able to thank the State Legislature for relieving them of the pesky task of having to exercise parental discretion for themselves.

Connecticut House Bill 5280 really does take all the headache out of a driver’s having to make the gut-wrenchingly tough decision not to hold “…a cigarette, cigar, pipe or similar device to, or in the immediate proximity of, his or her mouth while the vehicle is in motion or at rest” while children who are younger than 7 years old, weigh less than 60 pounds and are duly strapped into their child restraints are present in the car.

Admittedly, the bill doesn’t categorically target parents; it would apply equally to any adult vehicle occupant, be it a carjacker, the cab driver or sketchy Uncle Joe. And the bill’s only punitive provision is to issue violators a warning.

If it lacks teeth, then, what is it? Grandstanding? A red herring to preoccupy the media while the Connecticut House Committee on Transportation wades through ephemeral proposals? Well-intentioned proxy parenting?

The latter is most troublesome because it further advances the prevailing American culture of displaced responsibility, of law supplanting individual decision making, of policy encroaching on personal discretion.

Is any kind of smoking bad for kids?

Likely.

Do I have a child’s best interests at heart if I tootle down Interstate 91 with a pack of Camels on the burn and a pack of rug rats in the back?

Likely not.

Do I live in a Nation that endows me with a citizen’s measure of liberty — and a commensurate measure of responsibility — sufficient to make decisions like those on my own?

Well, do I?