Area 51: Black Helicopters Or Little Green Men?

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Two weeks ago, the CIA revealed one of its worse kept government secrets in a 355-page document. It admitted that Area 51, located on a vast track of government land 80 miles northwest of Las Vegas, really does exist.

Never mind that Area 51 has been part of the American lexicon and pop culture for half a century. Only now does our government have the good grace to tell us. Better late than never, right?

Area-51-mapOf course, the CIA’s release, full of redactions, is probably less than 1 percent of the real truth of what is really going on when it comes to the government’s black operations.

We are left to guess at what secrets are hidden at Area 51, a site surrounded by mountains that has immense parts of it buried deep beneath the Nevada desert.

Most certainly it is a cache for super-secret black military projects that we can only hope are not under development for domestic operations.

Are they all human, or is it possible they are of extraterrestrial origin? I don’t see a definitive answer coming out about this in my lifetime.

After all, Washington or those really pulling the puppet-strings in Washington have billed U.S. taxpayers hundreds of billions of dollars to build, fund and keep secret what goes on in and around Area 51.

In her book Area 51: An Uncensored History of America’s Top Secret Military Base, Annie Jacobsen delves into the labyrinth that is Area 51. It sits inside the largest government-controlled land parcel in the United States, some 4,700 square miles on Groom Lake, a dry lake bed. It is an area twice the size of Delaware.

The Jacobsen book is based on interviews with dozens of former Area 51 employees, all now old men who went to work there in the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s. They include detailed information from technicians, test pilots and scientists, but only on projects that are now declassified. That means the secrets in the book date back before the 1980s.

According to Jacobsen, the most bizarre and dangerous events outside of actual war have happened at Area 51. The scientists there worked a blueprint for a manned mission to Mars with a 250-foot-tall rocket that was to have been fueled by 2,000 nuclear bombs, which hopefully had controlled detonations. The laundry list for Area 51 includes top-secret spy planes like the U-2 and later the SR-71 (known as the Oxcart when it was first flown secretly by the CIA in the 1960s). Area 51 was also the testing site for nuclear weapons, including the neutron bomb, a thermonuclear device designed to release most of its energy as radiation (a great instrument if your goal is to just kill people and not destroy infrastructure).

As for extraterrestrials in giant test tubes and captured flying saucers, Jacobsen is skeptical. Yet she admits she doesn’t know for sure.

One thing we do know: Our government (or who is really running our government) wouldn’t tell us of extraterrestrial existence unless it served a purpose for the government.

One thing I am certain of is that just because there may not be alien UFOs in the sky doesn’t mean other aircraft are not flying over us right now. I might sleep better at night knowing it was ET flying over me rather than government omnipotence.

My UFO Story

I’ve been plagued by insomnia for years. Such was the case in Spokane, Wash., a decade ago. We lived past the southern edge of Spokane, so there was no light pollution — just a lot of tall pines in an open meadow. It was about 2 a.m. on a warm August night, and I was on our back deck looking at the stars. I felt this rush of air moving toward me. It was definitely not wind. I looked up and something soundless and blacker than coal flew just over the treetops blocking out the stars. The air rushed directly over me for a moment and the black object flew fast and low to the west. I never heard a sound, just an alien gust of air. As quickly as it came, it was gone. I stood up, stunned. Eventually, I went into the master bedroom.

“Angela! Angela! A UFO just flew over our house!”

“Oh you’re crazy,” said my wife. “Come to bed.”

Sleep was the last thing I could manage. I went back out on the deck. I half expected another flying vehicle overhead or (who knew?) maybe a fleet of them. Instead, there was stony silence.

It’s funny how the mind works when it faces a conundrum. By that time in life, I had pretty much accepted that I had forgotten everything I was taught in school. Yet one of the lessons came back to me from many years before when I was taking a philosophy class. (Who says philosophy never comes in handy?)

I thought back to a lecture about a 14th century friar, William of Ockham, who said that the simplest explanation is usually the right one. According to Ockham, when facing a riddle, the answer should be simpler than the riddle, not more complicated.

So I thought about what I knew. I knew something had flown over me and that the air felt like it came from a helicopter. It didn’t look or sound like a helicopter, but that didn’t mean for certain it wasn’t. I also know that as the crow flies, our backyard was 8 miles from Fairchild Air Force Base. I also knew that the U.S. Air Force was using stealth airplanes. Why not stealth helicopters? I had not yet heard of black helicopters, but this thing that flew overhead seemed to be just that.

Who Would You Trust More: ET Or Uncle Sam?

Of course, I could have believed it was aliens outside our solar system scoping out Spokane. But, frankly, I couldn’t see why they would be all that interested.

Ten years later, when my wife and I went to see the movie “Zero Dark Thirty,” I believed Ockham would have agreed with my helicopter conclusion. In the movie, which is the dramatization of the tracking and killing of Osama bin Laden, SEAL Team 6 was transported to the compound aboard top-secret helicopters. A general shows the SEALs the helicopters they will be on and states, “Technically, these don’t exist.”

When it comes to our government (or even who really is our government), there are technically a great many things that don’t exist.

Two weeks ago, we were allowed to know that Area 51 exists 70 years after it was created. But we still don’t have a clue as to what goes on at Area 51, how much black ops funding it receives and, foremost, whether it is friendly or hostile to our liberties and the American way of life.

Right now, it is all we need to know. And nobody responsible for the spending or the ultimate mission that exists in the creation and continuation of Area 51 believes that Americans have no need to know. Maybe that was a national security necessity during the Cold War. But the bastard government — in Washington or a secret cabal — is keeping too many secrets from us, the people. That is not what the framers of the U.S. Constitution envisioned.

Yours in good times and bad,

–John Myers

John Myers

is editor of Myers’ Energy and Gold Report. The son of C.V. Myers, the original publisher of Oilweek Magazine, John has worked with two of the world’s largest investment publishers, Phillips and Agora. He was the original editor for Outstanding Investments and has more than 20 years experience as an investment writer. John is a graduate of the University of Calgary. He has worked for Prudential Securities in Spokane, Wash., as a registered investment advisor. His office location in Calgary, Alberta, is just minutes away from the headquarters of some of the biggest players in today’s energy markets. This gives him personal access to everyone from oil CEOs to roughnecks, where he learns secrets from oil insiders he passes on to his subscribers. Plus, during his years in Spokane he cultivated a network of relationships with mining insiders in Idaho, Oregon and Washington.

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