Are Security Cameras Offended When You’re Lewd?

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Prosecutors in Barnegat, N.J., think so.

You can be arrested there and charged for public lewdness in the presence of security cameras, even if you’re the only living soul in sight.

According to an Asbury Park Press report, a 56-year-old woman was arrested for directing some unkind gestures toward an array of cameras on Lexington Boulevard.

Police in Barnegat charged Wendy Tucker with lewdness and took her to jail. The cops had found her parked car after hunting it down based on the March 6 surveillance footage. They declined to release a photo of the defendant.

What did Tucker do to be slapped with a lewdness charge?

She spotted the cameras, stopped her car in the middle of the street, got out, looked dead straight into one of the cameras and flicked it the dreaded double-fisted bird. She then pulled up her shirt, exposing her breasts to the whole array.

Judgment is one thing; individual powers are another. It’s difficult to be lewd when no one’s watching — unless the State has deemed its security cameras to be anthropomorphic little minions with Constitutionally guaranteed individual powers of their own.

Hopefully, there’s a defense attorney licking his chops to demolish this one.

 

Ben Bullard

Reconciling the concept of individual sovereignty with conscientious participation in the modern American political process is a continuing preoccupation for staff writer Ben Bullard. A former community newspaper writer, Bullard has closely observed the manner in which well-meaning small-town politicians and policy makers often accept, unthinkingly, their increasingly marginal role in shaping the quality of their own lives, as well as those of the people whom they serve. He argues that American public policy is plagued by inscrutable and corrupt motives on a national scale, a fundamental problem which individuals, families and communities must strive to solve. This, he argues, can be achieved only as Americans rediscover the principal role each citizen plays in enriching the welfare of our Republic.

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  • rod

    Prosecutors and cops should be looking for real crimes not silly acts leave the woman alone. Lets use Security Cameras to solve real crimes.