Another School To Allow Concealed Carry For Teachers

0 Shares
school

It’s only been two days since we told you about an Oregon school district that had elected to allow teachers to lawfully carry concealed weapons on campus. Well, it looks as though the dominoes are continuing to fall – this time in rural Colorado.

A school in the small town of Briggsdale, Colo., located north of Denver in rural Weld County, will begin allowing teachers to carry concealed weapons so long as they agree to participate in ongoing training that requires shooting a minimum of 100 rounds each month at a firing range.

According to NBC 9 News, school superintendent Rick Mondt said the decision, “is a benefit, we believe, to the security of our students,” stems in part from the fact that police and emergency medical response times for the small school are too great to compromise security by asking teachers and students to sit on their hands if a violent situation arises.

Weld County sheriff John Cooke, who joined other Colorado sheriffs earlier this year in taking a stand against enforcing the State’s recently-passed gun control legislation, said he fully supports the plan.

Briggsdale doesn’t have a municipal police department, and emergency responders can take 20 minutes or more to arrive. Devising a way for rural Colorado schools to deal with active shooter situations was discussed in the State Legislature after last December’s headline-grabbing massacre at a school in Sandy Hook, Conn., but a proposal to allow school systems to autonomously decide whether to allow armed teachers died during the session.

According to The Daily Caller, rural schools have attempted to get past the restriction on concealed carry by having some staff members serve double duty as trained security guards. In Briggsdale, though, the school system decided to open that dual-service role to any employee who wishes to participate and to maintain their training. Four of the school’s 18 teachers have reportedly signed on, though the school is (sensibly) declining to disclose their identities.

Personal Liberty

Ben Bullard

Reconciling the concept of individual sovereignty with conscientious participation in the modern American political process is a continuing preoccupation for staff writer Ben Bullard. A former community newspaper writer, Bullard has closely observed the manner in which well-meaning small-town politicians and policy makers often accept, unthinkingly, their increasingly marginal role in shaping the quality of their own lives, as well as those of the people whom they serve. He argues that American public policy is plagued by inscrutable and corrupt motives on a national scale, a fundamental problem which individuals, families and communities must strive to solve. This, he argues, can be achieved only as Americans rediscover the principal role each citizen plays in enriching the welfare of our Republic.

Join the Discussion

Comment Policy: We encourage an open discussion with a wide range of viewpoints, even extreme ones, but we will not tolerate racism, profanity or slanderous comments toward the author(s) or comment participants. Make your case passionately, but civilly. Please don't stoop to name calling. We use filters for spam protection. If your comment does not appear, it is likely because it violates the above policy or contains links or language typical of spam. We reserve the right to remove comments at our discretion.

  • Bill

    Finally, some common sense policies

  • Wellarmed

    Some good news for once!

    Looks like there will be one less soft target in Colorado, but I hope the school district hands each teacher that signed up 2 bricks of ammo each month and requests the spent brass after each exchange ( most teachers already spend too much of their personal income on class room expenses that the districts do not reimburse them for ).

    It would be good for the teachers to learn tactics that would allow them to build a Rapid Intervention Team (RIT). I hope they work with their local Sheriff’s department on building tactics and running through various scenarios as simply sheltering in place may save many lives (when the teacher is armed) but, will ultimately still create a higher death count than would be necessary if they went on the offensive. They (teachers and other staff) should understand the circumstances when it is best to shelter in place or group up and go on the offensive.

    So far as the issue with staff needing to do double duty as “security guards”, it would be much easier for the teachers and staff to simply be deputized and kept in a reserve capacity. Many areas such as mine have volunteer fire and reserve police that costs the tax payers nothing unless they die in service.

    Rock on Colorado!

  • ChuckS123

    Some recommend arming teachers and administrators. The NRA recommends armed guards. I’d say mix and match. A school could see how many teachers and administrators are able and willing to get trained and armed. If not enough, they could also hire some armed guards. Or, if they don’t want to arm their teachers, they could just hire armed guards.

  • ChuckS123

    Some recommend arming teachers and administrators. The NRA recommends armed guards. I’d say mix and match. A school could see how many teachers and administrators are able and willing to get trained and armed. If not enough, they could also hire some armed guards. Or, if they don’t want to arm their teachers, they could just hire armed guards.