Alabama Federal Judge: Tough Immigration Law Not In Violation

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A Federal judge gave Alabama officials the right to take many immigration issues into the hands of state law enforcement on Wednesday.

A Federal judge in Birmingham, Ala., upheld most portions of the State’s highly controversial immigration law on Wednesday. The Department of Justice filed a lawsuit seeking to block the law.

U.S. District Judge Sharon Lovelace Blackburn upheld some provisions in the tough immigration legislation which were under DOJ scrutiny. The provisions allow police to stop and detain suspected illegal aliens, permit schools to check the immigration status of students and allow the nullification of contracts that have been knowingly entered into with illegal aliens. She also upheld a section making it a felony for “an alien not lawfully present in the United States” to apply for a license plate, driver license, business license or other business license.

The law was set to go into effect on Sept. 1, but the judge issued a temporary injunction to consider it provisions before ruling on its legality.

The Department of Justice had argued that the State law takes away from the Federal government’s right and ability to enforce immigration legislation. But legislators in the State argued against the DOJ, saying that the Federal government has done little to enforce immigration law, leaving it up to the States. The Republican-led Legislature also contends that passing the law was the follow-through to many campaign promises during successful GOP campaigns of the 2010 election cycle.

Sam Rolley

Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After covering community news and politics, Rolley took a position at Personal Liberty Media Group where could better hone his focus on his true passions: national politics and liberty issues. In his daily columns and reports, Rolley works to help readers understand which lies are perpetuated by the mainstream media and to stay on top of issues ignored by more conventional media outlets.

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