Afghan Troop Surge A Deadly Failure

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It’s no secret that the United States has failed miserably in its efforts to enact positive change in the Mideast, specifically in Afghanistan; but a new military report details just how terribly flawed policies in the region have been.

Last week, the Afghanistan troop surge ordered by the Administration of Barack Obama came to an end, and the new report acquired by Wired’s “Danger Room” blog shows that the country is in worse shape than it was before the surge began.

The stated purpose of the surge was to stop the Taliban from gaining power and influence in the region, but the number of insurgent attacks has been higher every month in 2012 than in 2009 when the country was in so much turmoil that the President thought the surge necessary.

According to Wired, there were about 2,000 insurgent attacks in Afghanistan in July 2009. More than 3,000 insurgent attacks were recorded in July of this year. Furthermore, 475 attacks from homemade bombs were recorded in July 2009 compared to 625 in July 2012.

About 1,000 U.S. soldiers have been killed in action in Afghanistan since the President announced the troop surge.

With the surge coming to an end, the future of the U.S. in Afghanistan looks to be uncertain but the likelihood of the Nation ever becoming disengaged in the Mideast country is nil. This is due in part to the fact that the U.S. plan to cede control of Afghan security to U.S.-trained Afghan forces is proving a damning one, as the trainees continue to attack American soldiers.

Sam Rolley

Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After covering community news and politics, Rolley took a position at Personal Liberty Media Group where could better hone his focus on his true passions: national politics and liberty issues. In his daily columns and reports, Rolley works to help readers understand which lies are perpetuated by the mainstream media and to stay on top of issues ignored by more conventional media outlets.