Recession Increasing Burn Out In Employees

CHICAGO, July 31 (UPI) — Nearly half — 45 percent — say they think workers at their organization are currently burned out on their jobs, a U.S. survey indicates.

The national survey, by CareerBuilder.com, was conducted May 19 to June 8, included more than 2,600 hiring managers and human resource professionals and nearly 5,300 employees.

Brent Rasmussen, president of CareerBuilder North America, says employers who saw a rise in worker productivity during the recession primarily attribute the increase to the fear of losing a job and the effects of downsized staffs on individual workloads.

In addition, 73 percent are seeing the increase sustain today, while 14 percent state productivity has increased even more.

“The recession produced consequences for not just those who were laid off, but for those who were asked to work harder as a result of leaner staffs,” Rasmussen says in a statement.

“While getting more out of a smaller workforce is a sign of organizational agility during unpredictable times, it’s hard to see such yields in productivity holding forever. Headcount will be needed to meet increasing demands.”

Looking at burnout from the worker’s perspective — 77 percent of workers say they are sometimes or always burned out in their jobs and 43 percent say their stress levels on the job have increased during the last six months, while only 8 percent say their workloads decreased.

The survey was conducted by Harris Interactive. No margin of error was provided.

Companies Spending On Picnics, Again

TREVOSE, Pa., July 31 (UPI) — After the economic downturn, many U.S. companies scaled back morale boosting pursuits, but a survey indicates that at least the company picnic is back.

A survey by the Advertising Specialty Institute of 400 individuals working at companies indicates 41 percent say they’re planning a company picnic this summer and 8 percent say they are hosting a picnic for the first time or the first time in recent years.

“Companies that are finally making money again are rewarding their employees for all their hard work and boosting morale with big employee picnics this year,” Timothy M. Andrews, president and chief executive officer of ASI, says in a statement.

“Whether you do it with pony rides and barbecue or competitive tournaments and beer, it’s clear from our survey that companies are having fun again.”

The company picnic survey indicates that:

— 50 percent of employees generally attend.

— 63 percent say family is always or sometimes invited.

— 41 percent always give away promotional products to attendees, while 28 percent sometimes do.

— Of those who give items, 51 percent give away t-shirts; 44 percent give away recreational items like Frisbees, games and toys; and 32 percent give away caps and headgear.

Picnic offerings include: bouncy houses, inflatable slides, crafts, games, races, carnival attractions, raffles, water guns, hot dog eating competitions, medical testing, jousting and drinking games.

Companies spend an average of $4,116 on their company picnic, the survey says.

No survey details were provided.

Afghan Teens Face Death For Illicit Love

HERAT, Afghanistan, July 31 (UPI) — A teenage couple are in an Afghan jail and facing death threats from their own families for trying to marry across ethnic lines.

The girl, Halima Mohammedi, and the boy, Rafi Mohammed, both 17, met last year at an ice cream factory where she worked in the western city of Herat, The New York Times reports.

After a year of secret courtship, the boy, an ethnic Tajik, went to the Hazara girl’s village to take her to a courthouse to wed and was set upon by a mob of 300 people accusing the pair of fornication, and nearly killed.

“We knew they would kill us,” Mohammedi said.

When police tried to intervene, witnesses said, the crowd attacked them, burned their cars and stormed their police station.

The provincial council has decreed the young lovers deserve protection because neither was engaged to anyone else, and both say they want to wed.

The pair are now in separate wings of Herat’s juvenile prison, but face a worse fate if they get out.

Mohammedi’s uncle visited her to tell her she had disgraced the family and would be killed once she was released. Her father cried during two visits, but said, “What we would ask is that the government should kill both of them.”

“I feel so bad,” Mohammedi said. “I just pray that God gives this girl back to me. I’m ready to lose my life. I just want her safe release.”

Philly Priest Ordered To Stand Trial

PHILADELPHIA, July 31 (UPI) — Defense attorneys under a gag order could not comment on a ruling that allows a Roman Catholic priest to face trial in a Philadelphia sexual abuse case.

A gag order prevents comment on the case of Monsignor William Lynn, a former ranking official at the Archdiocese of Philadelphia who is accused of using his office to keep a lid on allegations against various priests, the Philadelphia Inquirer said Sunday.

It was not known if an appeal would be filed.

Lynn faces trial at a later date after a judge ruled Friday that he should stand trial with four defendants charged with sexually assaulting young boys in the 1990s. Lynn faces a charge of conspiracy to endanger the welfare of children.

Prosecutors say Lynn, who ran the archdiocese clergy office, quietly reassigned priests accused of misconduct in order to keep the allegations secret.

Common Pleas Court Judge Lillian Ransom Friday rejected Lynn’s contention that he should not be charged under a law passed in 2007 because the alleged incidents took place before the law was passed. The judge said she found that prosecutors had sufficient evidence that applicable laws were violated, the Inquirer said.

Psychology Colors Debt Management

ST. LOUIS, July 31 (UPI) — The best way to end debt is to make minimum payments except for one loan with the highest interest rate, but most tend not to do this, U.S. researchers say.

Cynthia Cryder, a consumer behavior expert at Olin Business School, Washington University in St. Louis, and co-authors Shahar Ayal, Moty Amar and Dan Ariely of Duke University and Scott Rick of the University of Michigan, designed several studies to examine how consumers manage debt portfolios.

The article, “Winning the Battle But Losing the War: The Psychology of Debt Management,” published in the Journal of Marketing Research, found from a series of debt-management experiments, participants consistently paid off small debts first, even though the larger debts in the study had higher interest rates.

In fact, no participant in their sample consistently used their cash to pay off the loan with the highest interest rate, Cryder says.

Because small losses impose a disproportionately heavy psychological burden, the authors say, eliminating a small debt may offer greater relief than making an equivalent reduction to a larger debt.

However, while it is attractive to close an account, that’s not necessarily the best approach to minimizing your debt burden,” Cryder says.

‘Slutwalk’ Movement Hits Streets Of India

NEW DELHI, July 31 (UPI) — A “Slutwalk” to assert women’s rights be free of sexual harassment in India drew hundreds in New Delhi, Sunday.

Organizers of the march, which began and ended at the Jantar Mantar observatory, estimated the turnout at 700 to 800 and claimed a success, the Hindustan Times reported.

Umang Sabarwal, 19, a Delhi University student and organizer, said: “I’m very happy with the response. The event was energetic and clean. … This is just the beginning. Our aim is to keep this going and create awareness about women’s issues.”

The walk was followed by a street play staged by the Asmita Theater Group, whose director, Arvind Gaur, said, “We want to fight for an equal place for women in this society. We can’t change the law, but we can change the society.”

“Our administration is very weak,” he added. “Instead of doing something, they comment that the city is unsafe, girls shouldn’t wear short clothes, etc. Only 2 percent [of] people get justice in rape cases.”

Slutwalks have been staged around the world since a Toronto police officer enraged feminists in February by saying, “Women should avoid dressing like sluts in order not to be victimized.”

Don A Dud; Texas Heat, Drought Continue

FORT WORTH, Texas, July 31 (UPI) — Texas sizzled again Sunday after the remnants of Tropical Storm Don failed to ease an ongoing drought and 100-degree temperatures, forecasters said.

Fort Worth almost saw its century-mark streak end Saturday but the mercury crept into triple digits late in the afternoon, making it 29 consecutive days Dallas-Fort Worth has seen temps above 100.

“August is usually a very warm month. It doesn’t look like anything’s going to break the streak in the next seven to 10 days,” National Weather Service meteorologist Matt Mosier told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.

The record heat wave in the Lone Star State is 42 consecutive days above 100 set in 1980. Mosier said while it’s likely that record will be broken the odds are probably against breaking the mark of 69 total triple-digit days in one year — 69 set in 1980 — since the scalding temps would have to last well into September.

For Sunday, the heat continued unabated along with the serious drought. Many areas of Texas are at 20-30 percent of their normal rainfall totals for the year.

AccuWeather.com said Don failed to produce much in the way of rain as it moved through this weekend. A weather system that could become Emily was being tracked in the Caribbean; however, the latest predictions indicate the storm was more likely to swing up the Atlantic Coast rather than head for Texas.

Ukraine Mourns 37 Mine Accident Victims

KIEV, Ukraine, July 31 (UPI) — Ukrainian President Victor Yanukovych declared Sunday a national day of mourning, two days after 37 miners died in two accidents.

The Emergencies Ministry said an explosion 3,000 feet underground at the Sukhodilska-Vostochnaya mine in the east of the country killed 26 people and injured two Friday, CNN said.

On the same day, a building collapse at the Bazhanov mine in the southeast killed 11 miners and injured four, but more than 500 managed to escape.

Both incidents were unexplained and under investigation Sunday.

Regional authorities in Luhansk said preliminary findings on the Sukhodilska explosion will be released Monday, the Ukrainian News Agency reported. An air-methane reaction is suspected.

“The coal mine will not resume operation until the investigation into the reasons for the explosion is done,” Energy Minister Yurii Boiko said.

‘Mr. Rogers’ Series Set For New Generation

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif., July 31 (UPI) — The classic U.S. children’s television “Mister Rogers Neighborhood” is getting a 21st Century overhaul, the Public Television System announced Sunday.

The “new animated multi-platform series” is called “Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood” and will debut in Autumn 2012 with a 4-year-old Daniel Tiger in the lead role.

“‘Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood’ is based on the next generation of the original ‘Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood’ characters,” PBS said in a written statement issued at a TV critics conference in California. “All of the original characters have grown up and now have preschoolers of their own.”

The new series was developed by The Fred Rogers Co. and stays true to the original “Mr. Rogers” strategies of developing social skills for kids and getting them ready to start their school careers.

Angela Santemoro, a veteran of children’s TV and one of the executive producers of the new series, told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette the late Mr. Rogers won’t be forgotten in the new series. Daniel Tiger will be seen putting on a pair of sneaker, which was a trademark of the old series’ opening segment.

News Blackout Placed On China Train Wreck

BEIJING, July 31 (UPI) — China says it has implemented a blackout on news coverage of the deadly high-speed train wreck that has resulted in some critical newspaper articles.

The Chinese Communist Party fired off a directive this weekend limiting coverage of the disaster to positive stories.

The New York Times said Sunday the order forced a hurried remake of several Saturday editions with investigative stories and commentaries replaced by cartoons and features.

Forty people were killed and 192 were injured July 23 when two high-speed trains collided in Zhejiang Province. The incident sparked an unusual outburst of online criticism of Beijing over the government’s development policies and alleged soft-pedaling of its failure and shortcomings.

The Times said the news blackout appeared to stir up even more bad blood. One anonymous editor said in an online commentary, “This country is being humiliated by numerous evil hands.”

Juarez Cartel Leader Under Arrest

JUAREZ, Mexico, July 31 (UPI) — Law enforcement officials in the United States said a reputed leader of a Juarez drug cartel was in the custody of Mexican authorities this weekend.

The El Paso (Texas) Times said U.S. officials did not provide any details on the arrest of Jose Antonio Acosta Hernandez, a ranking leader of the La Linea drug ring who is under indictment for the slayings of three Americans from the U.S. Consulate in the border city.

Mexican authorities say Acosta has been a particularly ruthless player in the Juarez drug trade over the years. He is accused of ordering gunmen to shoot up a birthday party last year that left 15 young people dead.

Acosta was captured Friday after a shootout in Chihuahua City neighborhood. He is the highest-ranking member of the Juarez cartel to be arrested since 2008, the Times said.

The newspaper said La Linea has reputedly been getting more vocal and direct in its challenges to American narcotics agents working in Juarez. Graffiti has been popping up in the city warning the “gringos of the DEA” to back off.

NYPD Monitoring Domestic Rightist Threats

NEW YORK, July 31 (UPI) — New York police were on the lookout for right-wing domestic terrorists even before the Norway massacre, Commissioner Ray Kelly said Sunday.

Speaking on ABC’s “This Week,” Kelly said: “I can tell you, in New York City, we have a task force in our intelligence division that looks at white supremacist/anti-government groups and individuals.

“In fact, just a few days before the [July 22] Norway massacre, we had a teleconference with our century partners — this is 100 law enforcement agencies in the northeast quadrant of the country — and that was the specific subject.”

“It is an ongoing issue that law enforcement has to continue to focus on, and I believe we are,” Kelly added.

“We follow certain individuals on the Internet,” he said. “They put out their feelings quite clearly. A lot of them are careful about not advocating violence.

“For instance, the individual in Norway, although he had a lot of Internet activity, did not advocate violence. He put his manifesto on the Internet six hours before he started the attacks. They’re somewhat careful about advocating violence.”

Remains Of POW Return Home After 60 Years

NEW YORK, July 31 (UPI) — A U.S. Army private from New York who died in a Korean War POW camp 60 years ago has finally returned home, his family said.

The remains of Pvt. John Lavelle, of Brooklyn, New York, reached Kennedy Airport Saturday, the New York Daily News reported.

“It was unbelievable,” said Lavelle’s niece, Mary O’Brien. “There wasn’t a dry eye.”

Lavelle was 24 when he was captured in December 1950 by enemy forces near Kuni-ri, a town in what is now in North Korea. He died of what is believed to be malnutrition in a Chinese POW camp in 1951.

His remains were turned over to U.S. officials in 1954, but the Army couldn’t positively identify them. They were buried at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii as unknown.

The remains were exhumed a year ago when Army researchers found evidence suggesting the remains were Lavelle’s. The identification was made possible by dental records.

The remains arrived in New York in a wooden casket draped by an American flag. A Port Authority fire truck sprayed water over the plane as it taxied down the runway before members of an Army honor guard removed the casket to a waiting hearse.

Gloria Webber, Lavelle’s sister, said the return of her brother’s remains have finally brought her family “closure.”

“We’re so happy to see that he’s back [home],” said Webber, 81. “We’re nice and relaxed. There’s no more worrying.”

Lavelle will be buried in Calverton National Cemetery in Long Island Monday.

Yemen Air Force Bombs Its Allies In Error

SANAA, Yemen, July 31 (UPI) — The Yemeni military admitted Sunday that its airstrikes have accidentally killed at least 11 allied tribesmen fighting Islamic extremists.

The bombing took place near Zinjibar, capital of Abyan province in the south, where al-Qaida-linked fighters took over in May and have been at war with the government.

“We give our condolences to the brave tribal fighters who were killed in the Abyan air attack,” an official who would not be named told CNN. “Coordination between the tribes and the government forces is limited, and that is why the raid missed its target.”

Hundreds of tribal leaders met in the capital, Sanaa, Saturday to form an alliance against President Ali Abdullah Saleh, who is still recuperating in Saudi Arabia from an assassination attempt nearly two months ago.

They chose Sheikh Sadeq al-Ahmar, leader of the major Hashed tribe, as their chairman. In a speech he vowed, “Saleh will not rule Yemen after today as long as I live.”

Gadhafi Seeks PR Help To Repair Image

NEW YORK, July 31 (UPI) — Moammar Gadhafi is looking for PR firms in New York and London as he battles rebels in Libya, his diplomats say.

Dia Abubaker Alhutmany of the Libyan Mission United Nations confirmed the pitches to The New York Post, saying “the government is trying to have the support of people outside the country.”

Ali Darwish of the Libyan Information Ministry has e-mailed leading public relations firms, asking them to “present our just and fair case to the world,” the Post reported Sunday.

“Libya has been under an unjustified media and PR attack which led to NATO’s military involvement,” he wrote.

But he also promised discretion, saying, “We can formalize any deal with your organization through a third party to help move things forward fast.”

There have been no takers yet.

“I highly doubt any PR firm will positively respond to this very unorthodox … request,” said Ronn Torossian of New York firm 5WPR.

Quake Recorded Off Vanuatu Islands

AUCKLAND, New Zealand, July 31 (UPI) — U.S. seismologists said a strong earthquake with a magnitude 6.1 struck Sunday near the remote South Pacific island nation of Vanuatu.

There were no immediate reports of damage on the islands and the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center did not issue any tidal wave warnings.

The quake was centered a little more than 200 miles northeast of Vanuatu and nearly 1,400 from New Zealand. The U.S. Geological Survey said the epicenter was a relatively shallow 19 kilometers (11.8 miles).

Vanuatu is located in a seismically active area of the Pacific but generally gets through the sometimes-sizable shakers unscathed.

Plane Crashes In Grand Canyon, 2 Dead

PHOENIX, July 31 (UPI) — A small plane carrying two men from Rock Hill, S.C., to Henderson, Nev., was found crashed in the Grand Canyon, with both occupants dead, officials said.

The plane, a single-engine Cirrus SR20 registered to Delaware-based Anansi Aeronautics LLC, was found Saturday near DeMotte Park in Kaibab Nation Forest, Coconino County (Ariz.) Sheriff’s Office spokesperson Gerry Blair told The Arizona Republic.

Blair confirmed both men aboard the plane were killed. Earlier reports from the Federal Aviation Administration said only the pilot was aboard.

Investigators said one of the men sent his wife a text message at 8:23 p.m. Saturday, saying they would arrive in Henderson in about 90 minutes. The plane disappeared from radar about 9 p.m.

The plane was reported missing by the pilot’s family when it failed to land in Henderson as scheduled.

Officials said the cause of the crash is being investigated.

Admiral Confident On Afghan Withdrawal

KABUL, Afghanistan, July 31 (UPI) — The chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, Adm. Mike Mullen, said Sunday in Kabul the U.S. troop withdrawal from Afghanistan wouldn’t hurt the country.

In his unannounced visit to the country, Mullen told reporters after consulting with U.S. commanders, the transition of responsibility to Afghan security and police officials was largely on track, The New York Times reported.

President Barack Obama announced earlier this year he wanted to bring 10,000 U.S. troops home by the end of this year and 23,000 more by the end of September 2012.

Mullen said he was satisfied that such a move wouldn’t derail Afghanistan’s progress.

“I am very confident that we can meet both the needs on the ground as well as the deadlines and the goals that have been laid out by the president,” he said.

The admiral said he was aware that Taliban and other extremist groups were targeting areas where U.S. and other NATO troops were vacating. He said the nature of small, targeted guerrilla operations suggested the Taliban had sustained heavy losses and weren’t able to mount major offensives any longer, the Times said.

Factions Battle In Benghazi After Killing

BENGHAZI, Libya, July 31 (UPI) — Libyan rebels said Sunday they have captured the camp of an enemy cell they blame for the assassination of their military chief.

Mustafa el-Sogezly, deputy interior minister of the Benghazi government, told The Financial Times four members of the group were killed and 12 wounded in a five-hour battle Sunday morning near the city, along with three rebel fighters killed and eight wounded.

Sogezly said the faction, calling itself the Shakir Brigade, was involved in killing Gen. Abdel Fattah Younis and freeing Gadhafi loyalists from prison during the ensuing turmoil Thursday night.

He said the group took orders from Tripoli via Gadhafi regime TV.

But Ali Tarhouni, the Transitional National Council’s oil minister, told the BBC that Younis was killed along with two other commanders by members of the Obaida ibn Jarrah Brigade, an Islamic extremist group allied with the rebels. The three bodies, shot and burned, were found outside Benghazi Friday.

And a Gadhafi regime spokesman blamed al-Qaida for the killing as speculation ran wild.

TNC Chairman Mustafa Abdel Jilil told Radio France Internationale that four judges acting on their own had summoned Younis — suspected as a double agent by some — to Benghazi for questioning before his murder.

Dad Sleeps, Lets Son, 8, Drive

HOLDEN, La., July 31 (UPI) — Louisiana State Police say they arrested a 28-year-old man who allegedly let his 8-year-old son drive his truck down the Interstate while the father slept.

Authorities said they received calls from motorists reporting a pickup truck driving erratically on I-12 near Holden, La. — and a child appeared to be driving. State Police were able to stop the truck and arrested Billy Joe Madden, of Hattiesburg, Miss.

Police said Madden’s son was driving the vehicle while he slept in the passenger’s seat. His 4-year-old daughter was riding in the back seat.

Police said after interviewing Madden, it was determined he was intoxicated. The children were turned over to Child Protective Services.

Madden was arrested and jailed on two counts of child desertion, parent allowing a minor to drive, open container of alcohol, two counts of no child restraint and no seat belt.

WVUE-TV, New Orleans, said the children would be turned over to family members.

Madden’s bond was set at $1,474.

CIA Pulls Second Chief From Pakistan

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan, July 31 (UPI) — For the second time in seven months, the CIA is replacing its station chief in the Pakistani capital of Islamabad, ABC News reported Sunday.

The agency cited medical reasons for the chief’s removal, although ABC said Pakistan’s own ISI intelligence agency was displeased with the CIA chief over his handling of the raid that killed al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden in Abbottabad in May.

Political and intelligence tensions between Pakistan and the United States have been mounting for more than a year. Both security agencies have accused the other of not fully sharing information, most recently with the shooting of bin Laden by U.S. Navy SEALs.

Pakistan also objects to the use of unmanned U.S. aircraft that fly anti-terror reconnaissance and bombing missions along the border with Afghanistan.

Seven months ago, Pakistani officials publicly named the CIA station chief, who left the country soon afterwards. Now, his replacement who oversaw the bin Laden raid is leaving too.

Five Pakistanis who reportedly helped the CIA track down bin Laden were arrested and CIA operatives report being increasingly targeted by police and other officials who threaten to expose them, the report said.