Exercise May Reduce Patient Anxiety

According to a recent study, regular exercise can significantly reduce anxiety symptoms that accompany a chronic illness. After analyzing the results of 40 randomized clinical trials, researchers from the University of Georgia found that patients who exercised on a regular basis reported a 20 percent reduction in anxiety symptoms compared to those who did not exercise.

Hey, Washington—Reconcile This!

Thank goodness for a conference in Scottsdale, Ariz., last week. I had day-long duties as the master of ceremonies—which meant I was not able to watch Barack Obama’s seven-hour healthcare summit on TV. The analysts I trust—and even a few I don’t like—say the whole affair was bor-ing. Obviously the president had no intention of compromising with the Republicans. Now Democrats are talking about reconciliation. Read this article to see what Geopolitical Editor Chip Wood thinks about that tactic…

GOP, Democrats Butt Heads Over Healthcare Reform

On Thursday, three dozen Republican and Democratic lawmakers met at the White House-initiated healthcare summit and agreed on one thing; the current system needs changing. Unfortunately, liberal and conservative leaders came to an accord on little else, leaving the often contentious six-and-a-half hour televised meeting with an uncertain plan on how to proceed.

Study: Bitter Melon Extract May Prevent Breast Cancer Cell Growth

Results of a recent study have suggested that bitter melon extract, a common dietary supplement, may help protect women from breast cancer cell growth. "Our findings suggest that bitter melon extract modulates several signal transduction pathways, which induces breast cancer cell death," said lead researcher Ratna Ray, professor in the department of pathology at Saint Louis University.

The Unthinkable by Amanda Ripley

Each of us secretly hopes that, should we find ourselves facing a disaster, we would respond nobly if not heroically. And we certainly hope that we would never just freeze, like a deer caught in the headlights—or worse, panic.

But how we respond to crisis may be hardwired into our brain’s circuitry long before we’re confronted with a disaster situation. And while practice or preparation can help us to respond properly, we may have little actual control over what we do in a disaster.

That’s the conclusion of Amanda Ripley’s The Unthinkable, which has a subtitle: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes—And Why?

Ripley, an award-winning journalist for Time magazine, has covered some the world’s biggest disasters over the course of her career. In this book she retraces some of history’s biggest calamities—from the 1917 explosion of the munitions ship Mont Blanc, to plane crashes, calamitous fires, the 9/11 World Trade Center attacks, hostage situations and mass shootings—and studies people’s responses in an effort to find out why some survive the seemingly unsurvivable while others perish in situations where survival should have been assured.

Human Rights Organizations Uncover Evidence Of Congressional Deception In CIA Secret Detention Affair

According to top international human rights groups there is evidence that key congressional members knew about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) interrogation and detention programs, and that the United States government covered up the details of its cooperation with Polish authorities in the so-called rendition flights.

Commander in Chief?

I hate to be a stickler for presidential definitions especially after Bill Clinton said: “It depends on what the meaning of the word ‘is’ is.” But given President Obama’s woeful performance as America’s Commander in Chief, I think he needs to be educated on the meaning of war. Read this article to learn whether the president understands what the word “war” means…

Human Rights Activists Call For Judicial Boycott As Report Clears Bush Officials Of Misconduct

The Department of Justice (DOJ) has found that Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Jay Bybee, then working as a DOJ lawyer, exercised "poor judgment" when he prepared legal memos regarding the use of torture on detainees in United States custody. Although the document failed to recommend disbarment, it has fueled an independent and long-running campaign to have Bybee disbarred.