Tornado season underway in the U.S.

Tornado season is underway in the U.S. Spring marks the height of the tornado season, and it is important to know key facts about tornado survival.

Last month, 108 homes were damaged and 24 people injured in Mississippi when two tornados hit the state on March 25 and 26.

A tornado is a violently rotating storm that commonly occurs in central U.S. between the Rocky Mountains and the Appalachians. Most last less than 10 minutes, but they can be extremely destructive.

According to Roger Edwards from the Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Oklahoma, people living in affected areas should know where to seek shelter and practice tornado drills at least once a year.

He dispels a common myth about opening windows to equalize pressure. In fact, doing so during a tornado only increases the risk of being injured by flying glass. When hiding in a shelter or a basement, widows should also be avoided.

Vehicles are extremely dangerous in a tornado as they can be violently tossed about. It is best to exit a car or a truck and move away from it. Similarly, it is a mistake to seek shelter under a bridge which offers little protection against flying debris.

When out in the open, individuals should seek shelter in a sturdy building. If that is not possible, they should lie face-down on low ground, protecting the back of the head, and make sure they are away from trees which may be blown onto them.

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Vitamin D measurement set for new standard

Scientists have announced they will unveil a new standard for Vitamin D measurement Scientists have announced they will unveil a more accurate set of standards for measuring vitamin D levels in blood later this year.

This comes on the heels of recent studies that have found many Americans are not getting enough vitamin D and are thus exposed to a range of debilitating conditions.

In addition to maintaining bone strength by facilitating calcium absorption, vitamin D promotes overall health, and its deficiency has been linked to a higher risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease.

However, despite concerns about adequate vitamin D intake, there is neither a standard laboratory test for measuring vitamin D levels in humans nor universal agreement on what the optimal vitamin D level should be.

Dr Mary Bedner, an analytical chemist with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) points out that "[r]ight now, you can send a blood sample to two different labs and get completely different results for vitamin D."

That is why NIST has been leading efforts to develop a standard for measuring vitamin D in collaboration with the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Dietary Supplements.

The result of their work that will be unveiled to the public later this year could lead to better prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, rickets and other bone diseases.

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Obama climate plan may cost trillions

Obama climate plan may cost trillionsBy the admission of White House staffers, the administration’s climate proposal could cost industry up to $2 trillion, and the Senate has just blocked the efforts to put climate-change legislation on a fast track.

President Obama’s proposal calls for a carbon cap-and-trade system that would set limits on greenhouse gas emissions and force industry to buy permits to pollute. However, it has been blasted by critics as a tax on carbon-emitting companies.

"The last thing we need is a massive tax increase in a recession, but reportedly that’s what the White House is offering," said Michael Steel, a spokesman for House Minority Leader John A. Boehner.

"And since this energy tax won’t affect manufacturers in Mexico, India and China, it will do nothing but drive American jobs overseas," he added.

Given its potential consequences, the Senate has rejected the administration’s efforts to fast-track the legislation through Congress.

Republican Senator Mike Johanns of Nebraska hailed the move by stressing that the climate legislation can have a deep impact on American families and the economy, and as such it should be subject to appropriate scrutiny and open debate.

Reuters has reported Democrats could still try to attach the bill to the federal budget allowing it to be passed by a simple majority, but it says the chances are slim because they do not have enough support.
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Natural remedies for stress

Natural remedies for stressToday, people lead stressful lives, and it is easy to simply reach for pills when symptoms become difficult to control. However, there many natural and efficient techniques that can make a big difference.

Firstly, it is important to know what triggers stress or anxiety and avoid such situations.

However, as this is not always possible and thankfully there are many natural products that have calming effects. These include chamomile, valerian and passionflower extract that can be found in many herbal stores.

Before using them one should always read the attached leaflet to determine if the product is right for them.

Besides herbal supplements, stressed individuals may choose from a range of mind/body techniques such as breathing exercises, physical exercise, yoga, tai chi, hypnosis, massages or meditation.

Popular among some people are alternative therapies such as Ayurveda, massage, Chinese medicines or Thai massage that sooth and help get rid of stress and anxiety. Specialized treatment called Ayurvedic Panchakarma is also said to have beneficial effects on the nervous system.

Interested individuals should inquire about alternative medical centers near them. For example, the American Botanical Council has announced it will open an Ayurvedic Herbal Garden at its Case Mill Homestead location in Texas.

Ayurveda is one of the world’s oldest systems of traditional healing. Commonly used Ayurvedic herbs include ginger, turmeric, neem and ashwagandha.
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IRS offers incentives to holders of offshore assets

IRS offers incentives to holders of offshore assetsThe Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has announced it will offer leniency to Americans who come forward with assets invested in offshore accounts.

The agency unveiled a plan last month to lower the 50 percent penalty levied on offshore account holders. It also said volunteers will avoid prosecution provided their money has not come from criminal activities, according to the Wall Street Journal.

In addition to that, "the IRS is clearly interested in information about bankers, financial advisers, lawyers and intermediaries," says Scott D. Michel, a lawyer at Caplin & Drysdale, quoted by WSJ.

"Lawyers who go in for voluntary disclosures are being asked to identify any such people with whom their clients interacted," he adds.
However, Bob Bauman, in his blog written for Sovereign Society, warns the government’s move may be "a trap."

He points out the requirement that the government present hard evidence of tax avoidance when asking banks for disclosure of offshore activities, and stresses the "illogical" approach that assumes everyone with an offshore account is a tax evader.

That is because under the U.S. law opening an offshore bank account is completely legal so long as it is reported, he adds.

In conclusion, Bauman, citing opinions of tax experts, cautions that volunteers can still be prosecuted under the proposed "amnesty" and that those who want to come forward should consult a lawyer before contacting the IRS.
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Direct Your Focus on Health and Wealth

The materialistic-instant gratification-pop culture mentality of many people today is truly astonishing.

If they see it they want it… now. What’s important? Who is the next to leave on American Idol, who is kicked off the island in Survivor, what is my favorite actor up to today?

What’s not important? What are you reading, what are you eating, what medicines are you taking, what is your government doing today to take more of your hard-earned fiat money and perpetuate the fraud that is the government finance system?

The difference in people is how they think. The difference in what people think is what they read. The difference in what they read is how much they read. How much they read is how close to reality they are.

It is so planned that billions of people should live and die and never know or experience reality.

The crowd can be described with one word—frivolous. The people are little children whose existence is prescribed by the system. Yes, our parameter of existence is prescribed because our parameters of thought are prescribed.

Who are the people of the system? They are almost everybody. They are the common folk. They are the professional class. They are, for the most part, the financial class.

A few get through the net to reality.

And most people who climb the economic scale are decoyed and diverted with materialism. Their existence becomes totally dominated by the desire to accumulate material wealth.

Riches are wonderful. They please the flesh but they are a blinder that most often blocks escape to reality. Materialism, properly placed, brings balance and quality time to life. Materialism is a tool, not an end, lest we worship at the altar of mammon.

There is an appalling difference between reality people and people of the system. Frivolous people have their existence on frivolous thoughts and frivolous talk.

My focus is on health and wealth—properly balanced. It is impossible to have one without the other.

Good health is where you can find it. It is seldom found within the sickness system or "orthodox medicine." It is most likely to be found in alternatives.

People can be measured by their proclivity toward alternative health. This is the same as saying their disbelief of pharmaceutical medicine. The more we progress to alternative health the closer we come to reality.

Pharmaceutical medicine is by no definition a health system. It is in every way a commercial business based on profits. Not one doctor in 10,000 suspects this. So tight is the psychological control of the medical system that no amount of persuasion or logic can dislodge it.

The professional medical class is money-motivated and it lusts after the pharmaceutical system, totally unconscious of the realism of human health. A drug system is incompatible with the health of man and animal.

Wealth is long-term value. It most definitely is not the diminishing, deflating paper money system that everyone thinks of as money and wealth.

Silently, a new war has been declared on all people who hold paper money assets. The paper money monster called depreciating paper is consuming more and more while we sleep.

He who builds his fortune, his savings and retirement upon a paper money foundation builds his house upon the sands. This syndrome is no different from the drug addict who plans his existence upon acquiring the next fix.

Think of transferring your existence from pharmaceutical drugs and paper money to life and reality above the "madness of the crowd" while you can.

Vitamin B supplements may benefit celiac patients

Vitamin B supplements may benefit celiac patients Scientists believe that people suffering from celiac disease stand to benefit from boosting their dietary intake of vitamins B.

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine resulting from intolerance to gluten and manifesting itself through chronic diarrhea and fatigue.

It also leads to vitamin deficiency, which in turn may cause higher levels of homocysteine (hyperhomocysteinemia), an amino acid linked to cardiovascular disease.

Recently, a Dutch research team led by Dr Muhammed Hadithi analyzed the effect of vitamin B6, folate and vitamin B12 daily supplements on homocysteine levels in 51 adults with coeliac disease and compared them with 50 healthy individuals.

Their investigation found that vitamin B6 and folate were significantly and independently associated with homocysteine levels in the celiac patients taking such supplements.

Based on this study, patients with celiac disease may consider enriching their diet with nutritional supplements that may prevent hyperhomocysteinemia.

Previous studies on vitamins B6, B12 and folic acid linked them to a lower risk of age-related macular degeneration in women, a disease tied to high levels of homocysteine on account of its impact on blood vessel lining.

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Online resaler: Bailout terms will hurt banks

Bailout terms will hurt banksRather than unfreezing the credit markets, regulations that come with the deals will stifle business and perpetuate the crisis, according to some industry insiders.

Foreclosure Warehouse, an online inventory of foreclosed homes for sale, has said the government funds include too many restrictions and controls on how banks should conduct their business.

"Every time the U.S. government gets involved with something, whatever it is becomes slower, costs more, and satisfies less," the company has said in a statement.

It also added that keeping insolvent banks in business further weakens the financial system.

The company has added its voice to the ongoing debate about the merits of the bank rescue plan and the scope as well as extent of banking sector reforms.

The administration’s actions, including the economic stimulus bill that will cost over $1 trillion and several rounds of financial institutions bailouts, have attracted much criticism.

Recently, former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich called on the government to return to capitalism’s basics by allowing failed companies to go into bankruptcy instead of pumping taxpayers’ money in to keep them afloat.
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G20 may spell trouble for offshore investors

G20 may spell trouble for offshore investors Politicians gathered at the G20 summit in London have vowed to crack down on tax havens by introducing cross-border regulation.

Blaming offshore tax havens for the current financial crisis, G20 leaders, with the exception of China, pushed for more regulation and compliance on the part of countries with favorable tax laws.

Media sources have reported that President Obama was instrumental in bridging disagreements between the Chinese and the French, in particular.

"There will be no guarantee about the safety of funds there," commented British prime minister Gordon Brown.

"If tax information is exchanged on request, as these countries have agreed to, then the benefits from being in these countries will diminish every day," he added.

According to a commentary on the Radio Free Europe website, governments have a variety of options to enforce such rules, including the freezing of assets of independents states if they refuse to comply.

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development has estimated that $1.7 trillion to $11.5 trillion dollars are being held in tax havens around the world.
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Safe Alternatives to Avoid Blood Clotting

All seniors need to be aware of their blood clotting mechanism. If our blood clots too fast or too slow, we could have a medical emergency. It happens all the time.

When our blood sludges (thickens), we may not be able to get it thin fast enough to ward off a stroke or heart attack. It is better to err on the side of thin blood.

There are many natural blood thinners, but none of these have been known to cause overly thin blood. Each day I take fish oil, cod liver oil, Viobin, natto, garlic and gingko.

If you’re under the care of a doctor, they prescribe Heparin®, Warfarin® (Coumadin), streptokinase, and T-PA (tissue plasminogen activator.) And after most any heart procedure, Plavix® is the doctor’s drug favorite. They don’t tell us what Plavix® does to the skin. Coumadin increases the risk of bleeding under the skin and depletes the body of vitamin K which has an important natural blood clotting action.

Streptokinase has a very short-lived action and over time becomes less effective. Heparin® must be injected and it can lead to allergic reaction, high potassium blood levels, osteoporosis, low blood platelets and even hair loss. And a number of Heparin® batches were recalled last year. T-PA is only administered as an IV, is effective for a relatively short period and is very expensive.

Natural nattokinase (natto) is a favorite because it is packaged in very small capsules with no taste. It is a rich source of protein, vitamin B2 and vitamin K2. Mainly, it contains the enzyme natto. The enzyme natto has the ability to dissolve blood clots. This is known as fibrinolysis. The body produces an enzyme called plasmin which has fibrinolytic properties. But for a variety of reasons, its activity appears to diminish as we age. So the effect of natto is similar to plasmin, but research shows that it is four times more potent. It is a relatively safe clotbuster for most people. I love it because it has been used for at least a thousand years in Japan.

We need to be aware if we have an overactive clotting mechanism. It’s dangerous! It leads to a host of cardiovascular problems such as hardening of the arteries, heart attack, stroke, intermittent claudication (leg pain upon exerting), varicose veins and high blood pressure. It is also thought that an overactive clotting factor contributes to senility, infertility, impotence, hemorrhoids, eye conditions involving the retina and fibromyalgia.

The enzymatic activity of natto is not only fibrinolytic (dissolves blood clots), but also it is homeostatic. That is, not only does it break down existing clots, but it also works to prevent the formation of excessive amounts of fibrin and reestablish a healthy coagulation mechanism of the body.

Natto is a clotbuster but unlike pharmaceutical clotbusting agents, natto does not reduce the capacity of the body to form clots appropriately and quickly to stop bleeding. Pharmaceuticals thin blood to the point of hemorrhage—causing huge black bruised-looking places on the skin.

Coumadin depletes the body of vitamin K and therefore limits the capacity of blood to clot when it needs to.

Natto can be taken orally in capsule form that has a longer lasting action, costs less and has no negative side effects. In fact, it has positive side effects such as increased energy, new and better circulation, better vision, less joint and muscle pain and has been used to manage migraine headaches.

You can find natto at a natural supplement company.

President’s budget proposal faces new criticism

President's budget proposal faces new criticismAmerican Issues Project (AIP) has added its voice to the growing chorus of criticism against President Obama’s proposed new budget.

The organization, which represents a coalition of conservative activists, is launching a telephone campaign against the proposal and the wasteful spending trend it claims characterizes the new Congress.

"Just when you think they’ve done their worst, Congress and [the] administration continue to amass debt beyond our control," says Ed Martin, president of AIP.

"President Obama has already spent more than [any] other president before him, [and his] is budget is just the latest move to weaken the American economy and the American entrepreneurial drive," he adds.

The phone calls will be made in many states including Colorado, Ohio and Pennsylvania, and urge people to oppose the proposal. The program will also give citizens the option to transfer directly to their senators and congressmen to voice their concern.

In recent weeks, many organizations spoke against Obama’s spending plans. For example, the Republican National Committee blasted the administration’s $3.6 trillion budget proposal as too lavish and based on unrealistic economic expectations.
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Gutierrez’s tour continues to anger anti-immigration group

Gutierrez's tour continues to anger anti-immigration group As Illinois congressman Luis Gutierrez tours the country to promote illegal alien amnesty, the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) has issued a new statement reminding Americans of possible consequences of such a bill.

The congressman will be in Philadelphia on Saturday, the latest stop on his a five week Family Unity Immigration Outreach Tour visiting 16 American cities.

He has described the journey as "an effort to document the harm caused to citizens across our nation in the absence of comprehensive immigration reform."

FAIR has been following his moves and stressing the economic harm mass amnesty would cause to American workers.

"While Pennsylvanians are looking for work and facing increased competition for jobs and mounting economic burdens from illegal immigration, [Gutierrez} is in Philadelphia peddling his special interest-driven amnesty agenda and calling for the abandonment of immigration enforcement," says Dan Stein, president of FAIR.

He adds that Pennsylvania’s illegal alien population has increased to 140,000, costing state taxpayers $285 million every year, at a time when the state is facing a $2.3 billion deficit.

FAIR was founded in 1979 and is the country’s largest immigration reform group. Its goal is to promote the idea that immigration reform must enhance national security, improve the economy, protect jobs, preserve our environment, and establish a rule of law that is enforced.
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New study draws attention to importance of stress management

New study draws attention to importance of stress management New research from UCLA scientists linking stress during teenage years to heart disease in adult life provides yet another lesson in the importance of stress control and management.

Based on a study of otherwise healthy adolescents who reported negative interpersonal interactions, such as conflicts with family and friends or peer harassment, the researchers found greater frequency of stress was associated with higher levels of an inflammatory marker called C-reactive protein.

"[This is] consistent with the emerging body of evidence that points to the link between stress and increased inflammation, which places individuals at risk for the later development of cardiovascular disease," says Dr. Andrew J. Fuligni, a professor of psychiatry at UCLA.

The study also found that the association of stress with inflammation existed regardless of individual teens’ subjective evaluation of stressful experiences, he added.

The study appeared in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine.

Alternative medicine therapies such as meditation, massage or acupuncture have been known to relieve symptoms – including headaches, muscle aches and fatigue – in those suffering from high levels of stress and anxiety.
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The Lady Is Still #1

I guess it was inevitable that I’d be disappointed. I had looked forward to seeing the show for weeks. It was based on one of my favorite book series. It was filmed in an exotic locale and made to look as authentic as possible. Three of the best-known names in the entertainment industry (HBO, BBC, and the Weinstein brothers) had combined to produce it.

With all that going for it, how could it possibly live up to my expectations? The answer, of course, is that it couldn’t.

But don’t let my mild disappointment dissuade you. “The #1 Ladies Detective Agency” is still an enchanting series. Whether you watch it Sunday nights on HBO or read the books by Alexander McCall Smith, chances are you too will be smitten.

You are sure to enjoy seeing our heroine — the “traditionally built” Precious Ramotswe — use a sharp eye, her intuitive understanding, and a healthy dollop of common sense to solve the problems her clients bring her. Jill Scott, an American actress and Grammy-winning singer, does an incredible job portraying Mma Ramotswe. And my oh my, does she dress well. It seemed as though in every scene she wears a different, brilliantly colored outfit. If some dress-manufacturer in Africa has inked a deal with HBO to promote its business, the product placement Sunday night was great advertising for it.

By the way, author Smith claims that he invented the term “traditionally built” to describe a native woman of generous portions. The phrase has become so accepted that the author says it can be found in the latest Oxford Dictionary.

All of the action in “The #1 Ladies Detective Agency” takes place in and around Gaborone, the capital of the tiny, land-locked African country of Botswana. The series’ author, Alexander McCall Smith, was for many years a law professor at the University of Botswana. Although he now lives in Scotland, it is clear that he has fond memories of his adopted country. In his retelling, it is a place of gentility and serenity — a community where people address each other politely and hardly anyone raises a voice in anger. He captures all of that very well in his writing. And I’m happy to say, so did the producers of “The #1 Ladies” TV series.

While what you see in the show is certainly uncommon, what is even more unusual is what you won’t see … or hear. There is no blood-soaked violence, no gratuitous sex, no profane cursing — not even an occasional mild “damn” or “hell.” There is nothing in the books or TV show that would make a maiden aunt blush. Watching “The #1 Ladies,” you will find it hard to believe that it is being brought to you by the same network that produced “The Sopranos” or “Deadwood,” which seemed to use the “f-word” in every second sentence.

The first show in the series was directed by Oscar-winner Anthony Minghella and produced by another Oscar winner, Sydney Pollack. Sadly, both gentlemen died before the series was finished. But as one reviewer said, the program is “a fitting cap to their career legacies.”

When Hollywood movie-maker Harvey Weinstein originally bought the rights to the books, he envisioned making a series of movies, not TV shows. “It was going to be my James Bond — the gentlest James Bond in the universe,” he said. Still, he says he is incredibly pleased with the result: “Of everything I’ve ever done in this industry, nothing makes me prouder than this television show, of all things.”

For those of you who missed last week’s show, and have never read any of Alexander McCall Smith’s books, here is a brief synopsis of the story line. When her beloved father dies, Precious Ramotswe inherits his collection of 180 cattle. Precious wants a new life for herself, but she also yearns to help her people and her beloved homeland. “I love my country Botswana,” she says early in the show, “and I love Africa. I want to do good with the time God has given me.”

She decides to sell the cattle and use the proceeds to start a detective agency. Somehow, she has come across a copy of a book, The Principles of Private Detection, by an American private eye, Clovis Andersen, and thinks she would make an excellent detective. The lessons in the book will form the bedrock of her approach to the cases that are brought to her. She says, “I know I will succeed, because a woman knows what’s going on more than a man.”

Precious hires an incredibly efficient secretary, Grace Makutsi, who scored a legendary 97% on her final exam at the Botswana Secretary School. Grace, who is played almost too exuberantly by Anika Noni Rose, is socially awkward, even inept. But she makes up in enthusiasm what she may lack in good judgment. She is the legendary lady who will always jump in (at least vocally) where angels fear to tread.

Another key player in the series is the stolid and reliable automobile mechanic, Mr. J.L.B. Matekoni. He is smitten by Precious and, to show his affection, is determined to keep her ancient little white van running. Much later in the books (and perhaps even in the TV show), he and Precious become man and wife. Even then, she always refers to him by his full name, including all three initials.

And then there is BK, a gay hairdresser who sends Precious clients and offers an endless stream of advice. BK did not appear in any of the books; he was added to the series, probably by a fan of “Sheer Madness” or some other show featuring a stereotypical gay hairdresser. Grace doesn’t know what to make of this person, who seems to have “a lot of girl in him,” as she remarks. But Precious enjoys his company and is amused by his remarks — as you will be, too.

When USA Today ran a preview of the show last week, the headline read, “She’s Precious, show’s perfect.” The article said in part,

“Anyone who hasn’t read Alexander McCall Smith’s best-selling No. 1 Ladies’ novels may be surprised by how lovely he makes life in Botswana seem, and how enchanting his characters are.”

The reviewer, Robert Bianco, added, “As much as anything, Ladies is McCall’s attempt to counter some of the stereotypes many of us have about Africa, and to share and explain the affection he has for a world where gentility and formality still have a place. You’ll hear it as much as see it: Contractions are seldom used, women refer to each other as ‘my sister,’ and people address each other with honorifics and last names.”

Bianco concluded his piece by noting, “this is as good an adaption as any Ladies lover could wish, one that overflows with the joys of life and exudes an all-embracing spirit. Be ready to be beguiled.”

I couldn’t have said it better myself. So I hope you will give this lovely and hope-affirming series a try. The next installment airs this coming Sunday night on HBO. But reruns are shown many times during the week. Plunk yourself down (or turn on your Tivo) and prepare to be transported to a kinder and gentler place.

At the conclusion of one of her cases, Precious remarks to herself, “when people ask for advice, they very rarely want your advice and will go ahead and do what they want anyway, no matter what you said. That applied to every sort of case; it was a human truth of universal application, but one which most people knew little or nothing about.”

As you will discover, Precious has a deep and innate understanding of the human spirit. And she likes us anyway.

You will definitely reciprocate her affection.

Foundation aims to challenge gun ban proposal

Foundation aims to challenge gun ban proposal The Second Amendment Foundation (SAF) has vowed to sue the mayor of Seattle if he goes ahead with his plan to ban legally-carried firearms from city property.

Seattle Weekly, a local newspaper, revealed the plan sponsored by Mayor Greg Nickels on March 24. The mayor’s office told SW the ban may be enacted as soon as May.

"Mayor Nickels thinks he can enact this ban merely by executive order," says SAF founder Alan Gottlieb. "He’s not even thinking of putting this before the city council as a proposed ordinance, because he knows it would never pass."

He adds that that Nickels’ office has been warned by the state’s attorney general that neither he nor the city have the authority to enact such a ban under state preemption.

Gottlieb also revealed that at a public hearing late last year there was much interest in pursuing a lawsuit if the ban is enacted, and SAF expects to be joined in a legal action by other gun rights organizations.

Founded in 1974, SAF is the nation’s oldest and largest education, research, publishing and legal action group focusing on the constitutional right to privately own and possess firearms. It has more than 600,000 members and conducts programs designed to better inform the public about the consequences of gun control.
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2009 will be a good time to invest in green energy, says consultancy

2009 will be a good time to invest in green energy, says consultancyDespite falling profits and stronger competition in some green energy sectors, this year may provide good opportunities for investors to buy the industry’s stocks.

Among the favorable factors that are likely to spur new growth for the renewable energy industry are lower raw materials and equipment prices, according to Frost & Sullivan, a market research firm.

The researchers also stress that it is unlikely we will experience a repeat of the situation in the 1970s and 1980s when investments in renewable energy ceased after oil prices fell.

That is because oil prices might still go up due to increasing production costs fuelled by high demand from developing nations, says Alina Bakhareva, green energy research manager at Frost & Sullivan.

In addition to that, "[R]enewable energy is much more mature than it was thirty years ago and is able to deliver power at nearly the same cost as conventional power sources," she says.

The research also highlights the commitment of governments around the world to curbing carbon dioxide emissions and suggests renewable energy is a major tool that will help achieve this goal.

Additional stimulus for the industry may come from the recently passed economic stimulus package which provides funds for some 90 renewable energy and energy efficiency initiatives contained in legislation passed by Congress in 2005 and 2007.

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Research links nutritional deficiency to depression

Expert links nutritional deficiency to depressionLate winter is the season when people tend to get depressed most, and one expert has discussed some of the possible origins of depressive episodes.

According to Shamir Benji, writing for empowher.com, an online women’s health resource, physicians have long known that vitamin B12 and folate are essential for maintaining the proper balance of neurochemicals in the brain.

A deficit of these elements is believed to be one of the causes of depression. However, inadequate levels of many other minerals have also been linked to the condition, including copper, zinc, selenium and iron.

Most importantly, Benji’s insight into some of the causes of such deficiencies may reduce the need to reach for expensive medical treatments in favor of a more natural approach.

Poor diet is one of the most common causes of low levels of vitamin B12, he says, and so rebalancing the diet should be the first approach before medical treatment is considered.

Studies have also shown that vitamin B12, in combination with other nutrients, appears to decrease the risk of age-related macular degeneration in women and may be helpful in reducing the risk of atherosclerosis.

Rich sources of vitamin B12 include breakfast cereals, meat, poultry, milk and seafood.

Vitamin supplements may be an option for older people or those who are concerned that their diet does not provide the necessary intake.
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Increase Oxygen By Increasing Your pH Levels

Low pH leads to acidic blood which leads to thick and sludging blood which leads to heart attack, stroke and early death.

In fact many diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity are caused by acidosis, and many other serious illnesses like cancer thrive in acidic environments.

Most people need alkalinity to balance their pH. The consequences of low or acid pH are serious, leading to acidic saturation of the body and death.

NOT ALL WATER IS WATER!  Most water is acidic and very harmful.  There is a vast difference between drinking acidic water and alkaline ionized water. Hydration is far superior with alkaline water. Water that is pH balanced is slightly alkaline—around 7.2 pH.

The chemistry of life is water chemistry. Water is the universal solvent. It is a natural solution that breaks down the bonds of larger, more complex molecules.

But not all water is water! Water must be understood in terms of its absorption capacity. The molecular weight of alkaline water is low, making it fast acting and able to reach all tissues of the body in a very short time. After all, the purpose of water is to hydrate.

Alkalinity from calcium lactate or alkaline water accelerates metabolism and transports vitamins, minerals and nutrients at a much faster rate than normal tap water.

When a constant high level of acidity continues, calcium will be depleted in tissues and organs. Then the parathyroid becomes activated and will remove calcium from the bones which contain 99 percent of the body’s calcium. Our bones renew themselves, which requires the ongoing consumption of calcium. But as the body works to provide alkalinity for pH balance it consumes calcium, depleting calcium deposits until osteoporosis, an aging disease, develops.