Class offers big pharma tips on avoiding lawsuits

Class advises to be careful about memosPharmaceutical and medical device companies who want to protect themselves against litigation can now take a course offered by a former U.S. prosecutor.

According to a report on Reuters, Nancy Singer – founder of the Medical Technology Learning Institute and Compliance-Alliance – is offering a course on how to avoid "land mines in your FDA records and emails."

Central to the course’s ethos is the idea that external and internal communications should be closely controlled to avoid raising red flags with regulators or litigators.

Singer told the news provider that the class is not intended to promote the cover-up of illegal practices or concealment of negative data.

"To survive in our litigious society, organizations need to have the right communications culture," she explained.

For example, she advises never to use words such as "illegal" or "negligent" but instead phrase sentiments more like "it could be argued that that doesn’t comply with requirements."

Singer also recommends monitoring employee emails and discouraging people from putting their concerns in writing to protect themselves, as these memos will only be used against the company in a lawsuit.

Companies including Merck have found themselves in court confronting leaked internal documents that indicate they were aware their products could cause harm.
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Washington lawmaker vows fight against RFID

RFID technology has raised privacy concernsRFID technology is being implemented without proper oversight or control, according to Washington representative Jeff Morris.

Jeff Morris has pledged to fight the use of so-called "spy technology" that infringes on people’s privacy, Information Week reports.

Included in his proposals is a ban on scans of people identification documents without first obtaining their consent, except in specific cases.

Morris has also said that all consumer products containing RFID chips should be clearly marked so that people can be in charge of deciding if their personal information should be collected.

"The potential for marketing and convenience is great with this technology. But so is the threat to our privacy and freedom," he said, according to the news provider.

RFID is an automatic identification method in which data is stored and remotely retrieved using devices known as transponders.

It is currently used in the logistics sector for tracking and monitoring inventory, as well as increasingly in consumer products.

This is not the first time Morris has supported limits on the technology. According to Information Week, last year he supported making the intentional surreptitious scanning of a person’s RFID chip without their consent a Class C felony.
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Real ID faces opposition, funding problems

Opponents of an ID card bring up privacy and financial concernsThe move to increase the security standards on state-issued drivers’ licenses and identification cards is hitting numerous roadblocks, according to a report by Newsmax.

At least 12 states have approved legislation that prohibits implementation of the Real ID act of 2005, which would effectively introduce a national identity card.

As part of the compliance process, states would be required to change the documentation they accept to verify lawful presence in the U.S. before issuing a license or ID. Additionally, the information they gather would be made available nationwide in a database.

Opponents have raised both privacy and financial concerns about Real ID.

Incoming head of the Department of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano has also stated her opposition to the program, saying that it does not provide adequate federal funding to support states’ implementation.

Indeed, the Department of Homeland Security has estimated that states could be forced to spend up to $17 billion to comply with Real ID.

According to Newsmax, later this month organizations across Virginia will stage a rally in support of legislation to block the act from becoming law, partly due to worries about privacy.

"No one can know who is getting into those databases and for what purpose," Donna Holt of the Campaign for Liberty told the news provider.
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Adult entertainment industry seeks bailout funds

The adult entertainment industry has seen falling salesIt may boggle the mind, but the adult entertainment industry has become the latest sector to ask the government for money to stay afloat.

Larry Flynt, known for publishing Hustler, and Girls Gone Wild CEO Joe Francis have indicated they plan to petition Congress for a bailout.

According to Francis’ spokesperson, they are asking for a similar arrangement to that sought by the Big Three automakers last month.

"Congress seems willing to help shore up our nation’s most important businesses – we feel we deserve the same consideration," Francis commented.

The pair cited statistics showing that their sector has suffered in recent months. DVD sales and rentals fell by 22 percent over the past year, as more people turn to online options, they said.

Flynt suggested that by helping the adult entertainment industry, the government would be making an important investment.

"Americans can do without cars and such but they cannot do without sex," he said.

Meanwhile, the Washington Post reported that GM has received its first installment of bailout money, in the form of $4 billion dollars.
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Antiviral drugs may help spread of bird flu, scientists say

Tamiflu may not be enough to protect against bird fluNew reports about a Beijing woman who died of avian influenza may raise fresh fears about a possible resurgence of the disease, which peaked in 2006.

And new research cautions the U.S. against relying on antiviral drugs such as Tamiflu to protect people against infection.

Scientists at Ohio State University say that evidence shows bird flu became resistant to antiviral agents known as adamantanes, which were used in Asia and Russia.

By 2006, these drugs were considered worthless because 90 percent of strains were resistant.

The researchers then analyzed 700 avian flu genomes isolated from a variety of hosts, discovering that one-third had mutations that allowed these strains to resist adamantane drugs.

"We can’t necessarily say what we’ve seen in adamantanes is predictive of what will happen with Tamiflu, but in the larger dynamic, perhaps it serves as a cautionary tale," commented senior author Daniel Janies.

In 2007, the World Health Organization warned that a strain of avian flu resistant to Tamiflu had been discovered in Egypt.
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The Calcium Wave: A Miracle for Me!

I have studied nutrition for years, but I think that my study of the calcium wave is my most satisfying to date. Moreover, I consider my experience with the calcium wave nothing less than a miracle. Most people live a lifetime and never see or experience a miracle of any kind. The point being that this calcium wave information can be your miracle the same as mine. I couldn’t wait to share my miracle with you!

For the last several years I have had what I term a subclinical infection, and I suspect that this condition plagues millions of people and becomes terminal in the form of pneumonia, cancer, heart disease and so on and so on. The implications are legion in my view.

Medical journals from around the world, from Scandinavia, Europe and the United States, substantiate the existence and the powerful presence of the calcium wave in protecting the body against infectious disease.

However, the calcium wave could not be observed with the human eye until Howard R. Petty, Ph.D., professor and biophysicist at the University of Michigan Health System’s Kellogg Eye Center demonstrated that high-speed imaging techniques enabled him to merge knowledge of physics with cell and molecular biology.

He uses high sensitivity fluorescence imaging with shutter speeds 600,000 times faster than video frames. High-speed imaging enabled researchers to actually see the movement of calcium waves. The calcium wave images resemble the movement of a comet across the night sky.

Back to my personal story: My life situation more revolved around my subclinical infection than around my all-important study. Doctors didn’t have a clue. All they could do was prescribe antibiotics of many and varied potencies. I can tell you that they were of no effect. This is to say nothing of my nutritional protocol, which I take religiously. I was apprehensive that with my best information and effort, all was to no effect.

Indeed I was taking calcium lactate in powder form regularly. Then, as in a flash, it occurred to me that I possibly was not taking enough calcium. I knew full well that lack of calcium was conducive to illness and fever at all ages from a teething baby to mature seniors.

Again, my environment demonstrated my infection problem. My wife had four boxes of tissue—everywhere I sat or lay—and equally as many nasal sprays and one or two in my car. I really had not had relief from constantly expectorating infected blobs of mucus in many months. I considered this to be serious. I was unexcited about taking more calcium, but decided to do it anyway.

Well, I took three tablespoons of calcium lactate powder in water, motivated by desperation. Within 12 hours all signs and symptoms of my tormenting infection was totally gone after a multitude of months of discomfort. I intend to stay on this protocol indefinitely for continued relief. No, I couldn’t believe it and yes, I thought this was too simple to work such a miracle. But the chemistry and science of calcium therapy is conclusive and powerful.

Remember please that 99 percent of our body calcium is in our bones. It is the one percent that has to do with the pathology of infection and the calcium wave. This story all takes place within the human cell. For this action to occur, we must have a supply of ionic or diffusible calcium preferably from calcium lactate or calcium citrate.

The calcium wave sends signals to key players in the immune response. The calcium wave is a stream of calcium ions coming into the cell. As a cell membrane begins to surround its pathogen target, two calcium waves begin to circulate. When the target is completely surrounded, one wave traveling around the cell’s perimeter splits in two, with the second wave encircling the phagosome, or sac-like compartment. This second wave allows the digestive enzymes to enter the phagosome and finally destroy the target.

The human immune system is miraculous but it must have the proper raw materials to protect the body from infectious disease, both viral and bacterial which tends to attack from the outer world outside of our skin pathogens.

The four essential nutrient raw materials are:

1.  Calcium lactate as ionizable or diffusible calcium, two to three tablespoons daily. I use Ultimate Calcium™ from Health Resources™.

2.  Natural vitamin C complex, four to six daily.

3.  Vitamin D3, at least 5,000 to 10,000 IU daily.

4.  Natural vitamin F complex, four per day. Vitamin F is a fatty acid and can be gotten from cod liver oil if the oil is not pasteurized. All four are essential to create the calcium wave, and they are all available at a natural supplement company.

First the calcium must be in the right form that is absorbable from the GI tract into the blood. This is vegetable calcium (five parts calcium lactate and one part magnesium citrate.) It takes just one step to get ionized or diffusible calcium from calcium lactate.

Other forms of calcium are not so efficient or don’t assimilate at all. The word “ionize” means to give an electrical charge to the calcium. How important is calcium? Our parathyroid gland is designed exclusively for calcium utilization; no other gland is dedicated to just one mineral.

Enter vitamin D3. Vitamin D3 is essential to pull calcium out of the gut into the blood.

And lastly, vitamin F is necessary to pull calcium out of the blood into the cell tissue. This is called ionizable or diffusible calcium. This is a critical indicator in determining sickness. Allopathic doctors never use this indicator, yet most patients entering the hospital have low ionizable calcium.

In summary, the calcium wave requires calcium lactate, natural vitamin C complex, vitamin D3 and natural vitamin F.

Calcium lactate powder mixed in water is far easier to take. If not palatable to some people, add 1/4 teaspoon of sea salt for taste.

Important notes on calcium lactate:

Seventy percent of hospitalized patients were found to have decreased levels of total calcium and ionized calcium. In hospital patients, there was a strong association between sepsis (toxemia) and hypocalcemia (low ionized calcium). Fever in children is directly related to low calcium. Hypocalcemia is a very common abnormality in acutely ill hospital patients and is associated with a poor prognosis.

Ionized hypocalcemia (low calcium) is common in severely ill children and they have a higher mortality rate. Unmanageable children who have chalky teeth are nervous and restless, and are typically calcium deficient.

The ability to suppress viral and bacterial infections is greatly reduced in a low calcium environment.

Dietary calcium enhances human resistance to intestinal infection by E.Coli and salmonella. Dietary calcium is also effective in reducing the severity of diarrhea.

Human bone is 1/3 calcium, 1/3 protein and 1/3 water. It is actually the missing protein in the elderly that leads to osteoporosis.

During fevers, infection, acute inflammation, etc., in order for the white blood cells to function efficiently ionized calcium must be abundantly available. When blood ionized calcium falls below 50 percent of normal—seizures are experienced. Reference: Textbook of Physiology, Zoethout and Tuttle, 9th Edition.

Another big thing!!! Since my first mega dose of calcium lactate powder I have had zero gastritis. I’d had fairly serious gastritis for twenty plus years. Hallelujah!

Final summary: We can raise the blood calcium level and eliminate disease in almost minutes. That includes both bacterial and viral diseases. Those of you intelligent readers, who activate the calcium wave, please let me know your results.

Drug safety concerns help dampen consumer demand

People are spending less on prescription medicationsWorries about the safety of prescription drugs have played a part in reducing customer demand for medications, according to a new report.

Micah Hartman, lead author of the federal report, told USA Today that people may be backing away from purchasing prescription medications as the FDA issues more safety warnings.

In 2007, the FDA issued at least 68 warnings on drugs, including one high-profile warning that diabetes pill Avandia had been linked to a higher risk of heart attacks. This represents a large increase from the 21 warnings issued in 2003.

According to the report, the growth in overall healthcare spending showed the smallest rise in more than 40 years in 2007. Most of this slowdown could be attributed to people spending less on prescription drugs.

Another factor affecting healthcare costs is an increased use of generic drugs, which are generally less expensive.

The report found that 67 percent of all prescriptions filled in 2007 were generics, an increase from 63 percent in 2006.

Meanwhile, last month’s research from the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine found that the use of natural supplements is increasing.
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Federal gas taxes could go up by 50 percent

Gas taxes could be set to riseAs Americans change their driving habits, the federal government has seen a shortfall in the revenue collected from fuel taxes.

This has spurred a discussion about how to make up the shortfall and continue to maintain sufficient funds to repair and build roads, the Associated Press reports.

According to the news provider, the National Commission on Surface Transportation Infrastructure Financing is mulling an increase in gas and diesel fuel taxes by around 50 percent.

This measure would raise the gas tax by 10 cents per gallon and the diesel tax by between 12 and 15 cents per gallon.

The American Trucking Associations, which supports the tax, suggested that the government change the label given to the tax to give it a more positive spin.

"Instead of calling it a gas tax, call it a carbon tax," ATA chairman Charles Whittington told the AP.

At the state level, similar steps are being considered to make up lost fuel tax revenue. In Oregon, the governor has suggested taxing people on the number of miles they drive instead of increasing the gas tax.
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