What is a Heart Attack or Stroke?

It’s a blood clot that lodges in arteries and blocks your oxygen to the heart or brain.

Take this as a fact. Aging causes blood sludging. Right now, if you are past age 35, your blood is beginning to sludge or get thicker. Oh, you don’t feel anything so why worry about a blood clot from thick blood until you have a heart attack or stroke. Then guess what? Your doctor puts you on a blood thinner drug. It will do more damage than the blood clot.

You wouldn’t think of not doing preventive maintenance on your car. Likewise it’s a fact of physiology that your blood is sludging so you need preventive maintenance. I’m not talking about an emergency, but preventing an emergency.

There is a natural, potent enzyme called nattokinase or natto. Natto is why the Japanese don’t have heart attacks. They keep their blood thin to avoid clots. Isn’t that about as simple as it gets?

Natto does indeed dissolve clots that have already formed. Yes, those clots you silently have building up right now.

So you get double the benefits. You thin your blood without a drug and dissolve the clot that may already be there.

This is better than science and drugs any day to prevent that dreaded heart attack or stroke. Natto competes with any expensive clot-busting drug.

So we can clean out the plaque in our arteries with oral chelation containing the nutrient EDTA and keep our blood thin to avoid a clot and a heart attack or stroke. Taking this supplement to prevent and fight heart disease is a no-brainer. Of course, it won’t help the heart disease industry.

Study raises questions about bias of published drug trials

Some drug trials may be reported with biasDrug trials submitted to the Food and Drug Administration may differ from the versions that are published, suggesting that healthcare professionals may be reading biased data, new research has found.

Findings published in the journal PLoS Medicine reveal that discrepancies between FDA-submitted results and published results were discovered among several trials analyzed by researchers at the University of California-San Francisco.

The differences included the addition or omission of outcomes, adjustments in statistical significance of outcomes and amendments to the overall conclusion of drug trials.

Medical journals and literature tended to feature more favorable presentations of these medications, the researchers concluded.

"The information that is readily available in the scientific literature to health care professionals is incomplete and potentially biased," the study authors wrote.

To reach their conclusions, the team analyzed 164 trials relating to 33 new drug applications. A total of nine were found to differ, in favor of the drug in question.

The FDA requires that pharmaceutical companies submit a new drug application before they can begin selling a medication.
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Melamine-tainted baby formula found in U.S.

Melamine has made it into American formulaTraces of the toxic chemical melamine have been discovered in samples of U.S. baby formula, the Food and Drug Administration has admitted.

However, in an interview with the Associated Press, the FDA said that the low levels detected are considered by the department to be "perfectly fine" and not dangerous to public health.

In China, melamine has been linked to the death of at least three babies, as well as the illness of tens of thousands of other children. The FDA previously said that it would not set a limit on "acceptable" levels of the chemical in U.S. formula.

Documents obtained by the AP reveal that out of 77 samples of infant formula, one product contained trace amounts of the chemical. Additionally, cyanuric acid – a byproduct of melamine – was discovered in a different product.

The FDA said that the melamine had likely contaminated the formula during the manufacturing process and had not been added deliberately. Trace amounts are defined as under 250 parts per billion.

"There’s no cause for concern or no risk from these levels," agency spokesperson Judy Leon told the New York Times.
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Poll: Americans oppose auto bailout

Most Americans do not support a lifeline to Detroit carmakersThe majority of Americans believe that automakers do not deserve to receive government funds, according to the results of a new survey.

Los Angeles Business’ most recent Business Pulse survey reveals that nearly three-quarters (72 percent) of respondents are not in favor of a rescue package to help the auto industry.

Meanwhile, 22 percent said they would support such a measure and 6 percent were undecided.

Comments left by readers of the website further reveal that many people feel fed up with Washington’s approach to solving the country’s economic woes.

One reader claimed that the government refuses to take a complex view of the economy, instead opting for simple solutions.

Someone else expressed frustration with the number of groups who seem to be stepping forward to request federal money.

And another respondent suggested that "the only serious cure for what’s wrong with the U.S. auto industry includes restructuring the legacy of debt, pensions and overpriced (by world market standards) labor agreements."

Carmakers’ request for $25 billion has also been met with skepticism by Congressional lawmakers, who said that industry leaders would need to submit a viable plan for the future before they receive a lifeline.
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Glucose Sugar Feeds Cancer!

Sugar grabs oxygen with a vengeance! Human beings live on oxygen and give off or exhale carbon dioxide (CO2). Plants live on carbon dioxide and give off oxygen (O2).To live among the trees and plants is healthy.

“One may wonder how any cell can survive, much less grow, in the absence of oxygen. But it so happens that plant cells are like that. Oxygen is a plant waste product that they discard. In other words, cancer cells are plant cells that live within an animal.

I understand that the National Cancer institute verified Otto Warburg’s theories in the 1950s. However, very little work has been done to determine the causes of a lack of oxygen to the human body.

A German biochemist, Dr. Otto Warburg discovered the cause of cancer back in 1923 and he received the 1931 Nobel Prize for doing so. In his book, The Metabolism of Tumors, Dr. Warburg demonstrated that the primary cause of cancer was (is) the replacement of oxygen in the respiratory chemistry of normal cells by the fermentation of sugar. The growth of cancer cells is a fermentation process which can be initiated only in the relative absence of oxygen.

Ever since Warburg’s discovery, researchers have been attempting to stop the fermentation process through drugs, radiation and surgery.” (from the book, Reverse Aging, by Sang Whang.)

Anybody who has ever made wine knows about fermentation in the absence of oxygen.

What’s the salient point here? Sugar feeds cancer via a fermentation process in the relative absence of oxygen.

What to do? Withhold the cancer fuel—sugar—and starve the cancer. Cancer tumors are sugar junkies. The more sugar in the diet, the more and faster cancer grows. See quote above from Sally Fallon’s Nourishing Traditions listed above.

So we get off of the glucose sugar diet and get on the ketogenic diet which is an extremely low carbohydrate and sugar free diet. There is a case of two female pediatric patients who had malignant astrocytoma tumor, which has no prognosis but death. They instead have survived more than six years after eliminating sugar. They are still alive and well at last report. In summary, cancer can’t live in the presence of oxygen. Sugar in the diet feeds cancer tumors. A switch to the ketogenic diet and almost no carbohydrates or sugar causes cancer cells to die.

Do some breast cancers go away on their own?

Are mammograms necessary?As a regular precaution against breast cancer, women are advised to undergo regular mammograms – but what if some tumors naturally disappeared on their own?

The findings of a controversial new study suggest that some breast cancers may disappear without intervention.

Norwegian and U.S. researchers examined the incidence of breast cancer among 50 to 64-year-old women who had mammograms every two years, comparing the results with those who were screened only once over the entire period of the study.

They found that the participants who were screened more frequently had a 22 percent higher risk of developing breast cancer than those who had less frequent mammograms.

Study co-author Dr Jan Maehlen told WebMD that some detected tumors are in fact "pseudo-cancers" that "will stop growing and shrink and disappear over a course of perhaps two years."

However, some experts – including the American Cancer Society – have warned people not to jump to conclusions based on the preliminary findings of a single study.

They recommended that women continue to get mammograms on a regular basis to help protect their health.
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Housing industry to join the bailout line

Industries fight for government fundsFirst, it was the financial industry requesting federal funds. Next, automakers said they needed a bailout, too. And now, the housing sector is apparently gearing up to ask the government for a $250 billion rescue package.

House-builders are lobbying for a Fix Housing First stimulus, including a 10 percent tax credit for homebuyers and a federal subsidy to lower mortgage rates, the Wall Street Journal reports.

The sector claims that action is needed to prevent the country from falling into a cycle in which declining home prices negatively affect banks that hold mortgage-backed securities, which in turn depresses the economy further.

However, some critics argue that the plan favors encouraging new home purchase, instead of modifying existing loans held by homeowners.

They raise concerns about the danger of artificially inflating the housing market, creating demand that does not exist.

"The government does not have the tools to rewrite the laws of supply and demand. By artificially increasing prices, we are encouraging more building," Harvard economist Edward Glaeser told the news provider.

It is still uncertain how Capitol Hill would respond to the homebuilder’s request. Congress recently denied funds to automakers, saying that companies needed to present a viable plan before they could receive taxpayers’ money.
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House prices continue to drop

Is your house still a worthwhile investment?Those who hoped that the rising value of their property would help see them through their golden years may have already started re-evaluating – now, new figures show the slide in house prices is continuing.

Figures from the S&P/Case-Shiller indexes revealed a double-digit decline nationwide, compared with the same period last year.

Prices fell by an annual rate of 16.6 percent during the third quarter, while its separate index of 10 major U.S. cities showed a decline of 18.6 percent.

"The turmoil in the financial markets is placing further downward pressure on a housing market already weakened by its own fundamentals," commented Case-Shiller index committee chairman David Blitzer.

He said that current house prices in many areas are comparable to what they were in early 2004.

Phoenix, Las Vegas and San Francisco were the three metropolitan areas that showed the steepest drop compared with 2007. In all three locations, average house prices are around 30 percent less than they were last year.

At the same time, a separate report from the National Association of Realtors revealed that existing home sales were down 3.1 percent month-on-month in October.
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Privacy worries surround ID-scanning machines

Travellers may have their IDs scanned when they cross bordersNew radio frequency identification (RFID) technology that is able to read information about travelers who are crossing borders has raised concerns among privacy advocates.

The Department of Homeland Security has already installed machines that read data contained on government-issued ID cards at five border crossings, USA Today reports.

These devices work by scanning the computer chips embedded in travellers’ passports, passcards and driver’s licenses, then displaying the data on a screen for border patrol agents.

However, privacy advocates have warned that people’s personal information is at risk of being accessed by others – including terrorists – at distances of up to 50 feet.

"There’s this strange rush to a fancy of shiny new technology," Lee Tien of the Electronic Frontier Foundation told the news provider, adding that the ID cards are actually "quite vulnerable" to misuse or a data breach.

Homeland Security has suggested that the new process will be more efficient and safer than the previous system of manually checking IDs. It has also emphasized that the data on the chips are encoded.

In August, privacy concerns were raised when the government announced that it would be retaining records of Americans’ border crossings by land for a period 15 years.
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Obama aide says he may postpone repeal of tax cuts

Tax cut repeal in questionDuring the recent hard-fought presidential campaign, Barack Obama repeatedly promised that he would put an end to tax cuts for wealthy Americans that had been put in place by President Bush.

Now, according to one of his aides, he is considering letting those tax cuts expire in 2011 as scheduled, instead of rolling them back on an earlier schedule.

The move would be intended to stimulate economic recovery in the U.S., alongside additional tax cuts for lower-income and middle-income Americans, David Axelrod said on Fox News Sunday.

"The main thing right now is to get this economic recovery package on the road, to get money in the pockets of the middle class, to get these projects going, to get America working again, and that’s where we’re going to be focused in January," Axelrod said, according to Reuters.

Obama is currently charged with balancing the need to plug an enormous federal deficit with the potentially dangerous effects that raising taxes could wreak on the economic situation.

The president-elect has also hinted that he will call for a larger-than-expected stimulus package for the country in the coming months.
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