Syndrome X: The Sugar Disease

All the chronic diseases of aging thread their roots back to sugar consumption. Of all the species, the human race has a very high proclivity to sugar addiction and sugar dependence. Doctors will issue a bag full of prescription drugs and never once say “stay off of all sugar.”

What is sugar? Sugar is any substance that has a glycemic index. Any food or substance that has a glycemic index can disturb insulin balance in the body.

It follows then that the more sugar or carbohydrate consumption, the more insulin balance is disturbed. Any sugar or any food or any substance out of which the body can make sugar directly affects insulin balance.

There are many, many ways to disguise sugar or divert one’s attention from sugar. Most supermarket manufactured foods are loaded with sugar usually in small print. The big diverter, “low fat” or “no fat” is nearly always in bold or set out in a box or different color on the label.

The manufacturers know that the public has been thoroughly programmed against fat consumption. So if they print “no fat,” the customer is drawn to the product most often loaded with sugar.

Sugar is now not only used as a sweetener but as a filler to build volume in “food product.” High fructose corn syrup, a major ingredient, is an extremely sweet filler widely used and deadly to insulin balance.

And would you believe that the only product with no glycemic index is outlawed by the FDA as a sweetener-stevia! Stevia does not disturb insulin but due to FDA regulations, it cannot be marketed as a sweetener, only as a dietary supplement.

Now, let’s talk about just one chronic disease that traces back to sugar consumption. Syndrome X-60 to 75 million Americans have it and according to Dr. Gerald Reaven, M.D., discoverer of Syndrome X, it is the number one predictor of heart disease.

And that good diet prescribed by your cardiologist can be deadly. If you have Syndrome X, carefully dieting to lower your total cholesterol or LDL cholesterol won’t solve your problem. In fact, it may make a heart attack even more likely.

Syndrome X is a very quiet malady that interferes with the ability of insulin to move glucose (sugar) into certain cells for later use. Unknown millions of heart attacks have been caused by the failure of insulin to do its job.

Insulin resistance is at the heart of Syndrome X. This is why simply lowering HDL and LDL cholesterol won’t solve the problem as is universally prescribed by American physicians.

About 25 to 30 percent of Americans are resistant to their own insulin. This means that greater amounts of insulin are required to get the job done. Unfortunately, excess insulin is the first in a series of events to trigger damage to the lining of the coronary arteries that eventually precipitates a heart attack.

Therefore, more carbohydrates (sugar) equals more glucose, equals more insulin, equals the formula for disaster. For each 30 percent elevation in insulin levels, there is a 70 percent increase in risk of heart disease over a five-year period.

Syndrome X or insulin resistance is a cluster of abnormalities that is directly related to heart disease but seems to be unknown to the medical establishment.

According to Dr. Gerald Reaven, M.D., in his book Syndrome X, The Silent Killer, he outlines the complete list of heart disease risk factors for people with Syndrome X.  This list includes known risk factors for heart disease including the risk factors for Syndrome X-important!

Syndrome X Risk Factors:

  • Impaired glucose tolerance.
  • High insulin levels (hyperinsulinemia).
  • Elevated triglycerides (blood fats).
  • Low HDL “good” cholesterol.
  • Slow clearance of fat from the blood (exaggerated postprandial lipemia).
  • Smaller, denser LDL “bad” cholesterol particles.
  • Increased propensity of the blood to form clots.
  • Decreased ability to dissolve blood clots.
  • Elevated blood pressure.

Lifestyle factors that worsen Syndrome X:

  • Obesity
  • Lack of physical activity
  • The wrong diet
  • Cigarette smoking
  • High intake of sugar/carbohydrates

The additional independent risk factor is higher than normal LDL cholesterol.

Notice the differences. The Syndrome X heart disease risk factor list includes the rate at which fat clears from the blood, not just the amount of fat in the blood. It also considers the formation and clearance of blood clots, and the physical characteristics of LDL cholesterol (not just the amount). The very important lifestyle factor mentioned above is high consumption of sugar or carbohydrates.

Heart attacks are two to three times more likely to happen after a high carbohydrate meal and are specifically NOT likely after a high-fat meal. Why? Because the immediate effect of raising blood sugar from sugar or a high carbohydrate meal is a rise in insulin. This causes arterial spasm and constriction of the arteries triggering heart attacks.

Substitute stevia for sugar as much as you can. Too much sugar consumption leads to the body’s overproduction of insulin. This is the basis of the chronic disease of aging and Syndrome X.

Ignorance of sugar guarantees more and more degenerative disease, oppression, and more murder and suffering at the hands of government, the pharmaceutical and medical cartels. Ignorance of sugar is the absolute foundation of economic collapse nationally and financial poverty individually. Ignorance of sugar is at the root of social breakdown and a drugged society, broken homes and the forcing of drugs on school children.

The sugar disease is the biochemical basis of all degenerative disease, especially heart disease, cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer’s.

Why are we not being told about sugar? Because it would mean far better and widespread health and happiness, and therefore far less trillions of dollars flowing to the medical monopoly.

Sugar is America’s number one addiction, beginning with little babies. May God liberate us from this curse that plagues the world but most especially Americans.

McCain considering tax cuts?

McCain may cut taxes on investments, an advisor saysRepublican presidential candidate John McCain may propose some tax cuts that could inject life into the listless economy, one of his advisors has suggested.

Senator Lindsey Graham told CBS program Face the Nation that McCain has been considering "a host of different courses of action" aimed at freeing up credit for the country’s financial health.

"Now is the time to lower tax rates for investors – capital gains tax, dividend tax rates – to make sure that we can get the economy jump-started," he told the program.

Over the past several weeks, politicians and policymakers have been debating the best method for restarting economic growth in America.

The government has already taken a variety of steps to calm the public’s fears, including the announcement of a $700 billion bailout for banks, but few signs of recovery have been noted.

Graham told Face the Nation that November’s vote may determine the path the country takes in the next four years.

"Senator Obama, who’s masquerading as a centrist, is anything but a centrist when it comes to taxing, spending and social policy," he explained.

On Monday, McCain delivered a stump speech in Virginia during which he attempted to differentiate his economic policies from those of the past eight years and called the country to "change direction."
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Privacy protection urged for California city

Street-level photos are causing a stir in Santa RosaPrivacy and civil liberty concerns have been raised about the way that the city of Santa Rosa, California manages the data it collects about residents.

More specifically, privacy advocates have been calling for stricter controls and clear policies to limit who can access information, the Press Democrat reports.

One of the initiatives that is under scrutiny is a scheme currently being carried out by city-hired contractors to photograph every street in the city.

The idea is to create a digital photo database of city-owned property so that future trips to the sites can be avoided, thus increasing efficiency.

However, Pam Dixon of the World Privacy Forum has said that Santa Rosa’s implementation of this plan has so far been "irresponsible."

"Information held by the government can be used to influence your world in very profound ways," she told the news provider.

In response, the city’s chief technology officer Eric McHenry said that his team had decided to cut back on the number of city employees who have access the street-level photos.

However, legal questions remain about how the information would be shared under California’s open access laws, the publication stated.
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Law could make NH hospitals disclose mistakes

New Hampshire could be the latest state to make hospital errors publicNew Hampshire hospitals that are guilty of serious errors may soon be required to report these missteps to the public, under a new law that is under consideration in the state.

The legislation centers on so-called "never events," which are defined by the National Quality Forum as medical care errors that are "clearly identifiable, preventable and serious in the consequences for patients – and that indicate a real problem in the safety and credibility of a healthcare facility," the Union Leader reports.

A 1999 study by the Institute of Medicine estimated that between 44,000 and 98,000 people die as a result of never events in U.S. hospitals each year.

However, New Hampshire is one of the states that does not keep track of such events, which the institute said may include problems such as adverse drug events, improper transfusions, surgical injuries and mistaken identities of patients – among others.

Lori Nerbonne of NH Patient Voices told the publication that it is in the public’s interest to know about hospital errors.

"We pay for this care, and as consumers, have a basic right to know if we or our family has been harmed or died as a result of it," she explained.
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NSA accused of eavesdropping on personal phone calls

The NSA is accused of routinely invading people's privacyThe National Security Administration is currently under investigation for charges that it listened in on personal phone calls made by military personnel and other Americans living overseas, it has emerged.

Two former employees of the NSA say that staff monitored and shared access to these communications, even though the callers were not suspected of terrorist activities.

In fact, former U.S. Navy Arab linguist David Murfee Faulk told ABC News that staff often listened to intimate conversations between military officers and their spouses or partners in the U.S., sharing the contents of some of the racier calls with colleagues.

Senate intelligence committee chairman John D. Rockefeller IV, who is investigating the allegations, said that the accusations were "extremely disturbing."

"Any time there is an allegation regarding abuse of the privacy and civil liberties of Americans, it is a very serious matter," he explained.

In September 2007, the New York Times reported that the NSA said that it had stopped the practice of using wiretaps on Americans’ phones without first obtaining a warrant – a measure that had been introduced shortly after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.
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Survey: Americans don’t trust the Fed

Americans are losing confidence in the Federal ReserveIt seems that the current credit crisis has eroded many Americans’ confidence in financial institutions and the government’s ability to set monetary policy.

A new poll conducted by Reuters and the University of Michigan found that more than half of U.S. consumers say they have less confidence in the Federal Reserve than they did five years ago.

And 29 percent of respondents reported having "a lot less" confidence in the Fed.

Survey director Richard Curtin said that these findings could indicate that "a longer and deeper recession" is on the horizon.

"This loss in confidence will cause consumers to accelerate their spending cutbacks and those reductions are likely to persist through most of 2009," he wrote in the report.

In contrast, following the 1987 stock market crash, less than one in five consumers (19 percent) said they had less confidence in the Fed, with seven percent reporting a lot less confidence.

On Friday, President Bush made a statement about the government’s efforts to combat a more serious economic downturn, saying that it was instigating an "aggressive" plan to restore equilibrium. He also urged Americans to have confidence in the government’s ability to solve the problem.
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Pediatricians admit struggles with disclosing errors

Doctors would not always admit errorsWhen a child’s health is at stake, parents may expect complete candor from doctors and pediatricians – but in reality, is this always the case?

A new study published in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine reveals that children’s doctors differ in their approach to disclosing a medical error.

Researchers led by Dr. David J. Loren of the University of Washington School of Medicine polled more than 200 pediatricians about their responses to scenarios in which a child was hospitalized due to an error on their part.

In one of the examples, parents were more likely to be aware of the mistake, while in the other it was more easily concealed.

The survey results revealed a tendency to be more likely to acknowledge an error when it would already be obvious to the family involved.

"This study demonstrated marked variation in when and how pediatricians might disclose medical errors and found that they may be less likely to disclose an error that was less apparent to the family," the researchers wrote.

According to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, medication errors result in around 770,000 injuries and deaths each year in the U.S.
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Some experts backing cash investments

Some say cash is safer at the momentIt seems that each day brings new headlines about financial turmoil and a tumultuous stock market, with the result that the average investor may be uncertain about how to protect their wealth.

According to a report in the Wall Street Journal, some financial advisors are attempting to keep their clients’ money safe by increasing their cash holdings and exposure to cash and cash-equivalent investments.

Pran Tiku, a wealth manager for Peak Financial Management, told the news provider that he has been selling off lower-quality bonds with a higher yield in order to raise cash.

"If the credit crunch is as ominous as it seems and does not have a resolution, then cash becomes a very important investment to hold," he said.

In a more even-keeled market, Tiku said that he holds at least five percent of someone’s portfolio in cash and cash-equivalent short-term investments.

However, the current climate has prompted him to raise this proportion to 30 percent, while decreasing the amount held in bonds from 30 to seven percent.

Last week, Fortune magazine writer Eugenia Levinson suggested that people consider purchasing tax-exempt money market funds, which currently offer an unusually high average yield.
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Pfizer accused of suppressing study results

Pfizer is accused of manipulating resultsA lawsuit has been filed against pharmaceutical firm Pfizer, alleging that the company attempted to suppress negative research about its epilepsy drug, Neurontin.

Documents submitted by the plaintiffs allege that the drug company delayed publication of certain studies regarding the medication’s success for conditions other than epilepsy.

They also claim that Pfizer used spin techniques to make results seem more positive and combined both favorable and negative findings together, which distorted research.

The pharmaceutical giant has denied it is at fault, releasing a statement saying it is "committed to the communication of medically or scientifically significant results of all studies, regardless of outcome."

According to the New York Times, some of the studies in question raised doubts about how effectively Neurontin was at treating bipolar disorder, some types of pain and migraines.

In 2004, the drug company paid hundreds of millions of dollars to settle a lawsuit claiming Neurontin was promoted to treat unapproved conditions by Warner-Lambert, a firm which was purchased by Pfizer in 2000.

Pfizer stopped marketing Neurontin in 2004, when it lost its patent protection. The company’s 2007 revenue was $48.4 billion.
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Forbes says pro-tax policies would result in “stagnation”

Is a tax cut needed to stimulate the economy?Steve Forbes, publisher and editor-in-chief of Forbes magazine, has spoken out against policies that raise taxes in times of financial crisis, claiming that they stifle the economy.

"It was the Roosevelt-Hoover policies that were a disaster in the 30s [and] inflationary, pro-tax policies in the 70s, that turned that decade into a decade of stagnation – and Reagan reversed it," he told CNBC, according to Newsmax.

Forbes has been constantly vocal about the need for tax reform, particularly during his two bids for the presidency in 1996 and 2000.

He has suggested that the U.S. government dispose of the current tax code completely and replace it with a flat tax of 17 percent. He also opposes taxes on social security, pensions, personal savings and capital gains.

In the CNBC interview, Forbes also called for an end to market-to-market accounting rules, which he blamed for the downfall of firms such as AIG and Lehman Brothers.

"This thing is now 14 months old, when it should have been 14 weeks," he added, referring to the credit crisis.
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